If the FCA won’t regulate bad behaviour by banks such as RBS, then who will?

Tuesday 4 September 2018 11:06 am whatsapp John McElroy whatsapp This summer, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) confirmed that it would take no disciplinary action against Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), despite its “widespread and systematic” mistreatment of SME customers at the hands of its restructuring arm GRG.This is disappointing, but it’s no surprise that the regulator is unable to do anything. The Senior Managers Regime – which launched in 2016 to hold executives to account – is not retrospective. Meanwhile, the current regulations, or lack thereof, around commercial lending to SMEs are in dire need of review. The GRG saga has thrown this into sharp relief, and raises the glaring question: if the regulator won’t regulate, who will? The current situation is untenable. Since it is so difficult for the regulator to act within the regulatory framework, the banks appear untouchable – an unacceptable outcome.Read more: Why a red tape bonfire won’t help fintechWhile the FCA regulates all financial firms that provide services to consumers, the watchdog needs to have the powers to investigate and punish all divisions of financial institutions that are customer-facing – even if the customer is an SME.Even the remedies that are in place are inadequate – a fact that is demonstrated by the figures released by RBS in relation to its compensation scheme, set up by the bank to deal with complaints relating to GRG.The scheme has been widely criticised, not only for the number of cases it has processed, but for the value of compensation granted, and for its limited scope. According to the FCA’s own analysis, GRG has been responsible for thousands of SMEs closing unnecessarily, but many have not been able to claim any recompense because of RBS’s definition of which businesses could claim. Share If the FCA won’t regulate bad behaviour by banks such as RBS, then who will? Finally, we need to make clear what it means for the FCA to “oversee” compensation schemes. The regulator said it would “oversee” the scheme, and yet RBS – by its own admission – has only accepted responsibility for any losses in around 25 per cent of claims.The FCA needs to have proper oversight, with set conditions, rather than running the risk of letting banks turn such schemes into PR exercises.While the FCA has faced criticism for the saga, steps can and should be taken to rectify the current situation and grant those who have suffered at the hands of GRG the justice and compensation they deserve. The regulator and consumers will want to ensure that an episode like this does not happen again.To do this, the regulators need teeth to bite back.Read more: Experts sceptical of new powers for Pensions Regulator For example, the FCA’s initial investigation included all customers in the Specialised Relationship Management Unit (SRM), a unit within GRG. However, RBS’s definition of GRG customers in the compensation scheme only included a subset of SRM customers, as the bank maintains that the whole SRM unit was never part of GRG.The result is that 8,000 SRM small business owners have been excluded outright from the compensation scheme.This is further compounded by the announcement in July from RBS that it is planning to close the compensation scheme in October. This is apparently due to the decline of complaints – according to RBS, it is currently receiving “roughly six complaints a week, a number that has been in decline since its peak of 35 a week in December 2016”.However, the bank has so far only received 1,230 complaints from the 16,000 customers eligible to use the scheme, and resolved just over 50 per cent of those made. And only 390 of those cases have been upheld (95 per cent of them only in part).Furthermore, while the bank has put aside £400m for the scheme, just £10m has been paid so far for direct losses, and £115m in automatic refunds for fees charged by GRG. In other words, less than one third of the compensation pot has been paid out. The justification for closing the compensation scheme next month therefore seems premature at best.Businesses that have already submitted a claim will be processed under the current scheme. Any that complain after the closing date can use the bank’s normal complaints procedure, but cannot appeal to a third party if they disagree with the bank’s finding. This is despite the FCA’s findings that GRG was directly at fault.The FCA is already overstretched, and while one would not want to overburden it, there is no point in having a regulator that has no teeth and cannot hold the sector accountable. The lack of sufficient regulation means that many SMEs that suffered because of RBS’s conduct did not and will not receive the compensation they deserve.Many have asked if this shows that more legislation is needed. It clearly does. The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Fair Business Banking has asked the FCA to release its findings so that “the public, press and parliamentarians can determine whether the FCA should have taken action against senior management and whether we need to provide the regulator with more powers”.In these circumstances, we need to discuss whether the FCA’s powers should be made retrospective, in order to ensure that RBS is penalised appropriately. Lessons also need to be learned from the inadequacies of the compensation scheme. read more

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Treasury Committee calls for economic data alongside lockdown roadmap

first_img (Getty Images) Also Read: Treasury Committee calls for economic modelling alongside Covid lockdown roadmap (Getty Images) Also Read: Treasury Committee calls for economic modelling alongside Covid lockdown roadmap Johnson is set to unveil his roadmap out of the current lockdown for England in one weeks’ time. Outdoor dining whatsapp “We acknowledge that it has not been possible to support everyone in the way they might want, but we continue to keep our schemes under review and will set out the next stage of economic support at Budget.” A Treasury spokesperson said: “The PM has said that we’ll set out a clear roadmap out of the current restrictions with dates later in February. Committee chair and Tory MP Mel Stride wants chancellor Rishi Sunak to produce the combined modelling, known as epi-macro modelling, to provide businesses the economic and social impact of Covid restrictions. (Getty Images) Stefan Boscia The Prime Minister confirmed on Saturday that schools would likely reopen on 8 March, while one Downing Street source told The Sunday Telegraph that some outdoor picnics and gatherings would also be allowed from that date. whatsapp Tags: Coronavirus Media reports over the past few days have also speculated that hospitality will reopen for outdoor dining and drinking from 1 April. Stride said that his announcement must come alongside detailed modelling.center_img “After almost a year of restrictions, people and businesses need confidence that the government has a clear route of out the crisis,” he said. “To provide this confidence, the Government must set out the criteria for how and when it will lift lockdown restrictions. Westminster’s Treasury Select Committee has called for the government to release economic and epidemiological modelling on Covid restrictions when Boris Johnson unveils his roadmap out of the lockdown. Show Comments ▼ The source said people would be able to meet one person outside that is not in their household without exercising, while whole households will be able to have gatherings outside. Treasury Committee calls for economic modelling alongside Covid lockdown roadmap “Throughout this crisis, we have done all we can to support jobs and livelihoods, spending over £280 billion in response to the pandemic. Share “This should be supported by combined economic and epidemiological modelling undertaken by the Treasury, showing how it would best optimise health and economic outcomes.” More From Our Partners Astounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.com Monday 15 February 2021 6:37 am The latest report from the select committee also chastised Sunak and the Treasury for not being transparent enough on the economic impact of Covid restrictions. last_img read more

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Veteran of Alaska campaigns said to be in line for White House job

first_imgFederal Government | Nation & WorldVeteran of Alaska campaigns said to be in line for White House jobFebruary 18, 2017 by Liz Ruskin, Alaska Public Media Share:The Washington-based political strategist has worked on several Alaska campaigns could be in line to be President Donald Trump’s communications director.The Wall Street Journal and other national news outlets are reporting that Mike Dubke is about to be named to the post.Audio Playerhttp://media.aprn.org/2017/ann-20170217-01.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Dubke helped U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski win re-election last year, and in 2014, his firm was the lead strategist behind Dan Sullivan’s election to the U.S. Senate.Sullivan said in a written statement he could think of no one better for the communications job than Dubke. He also said Dubke has a lot of experience advancing pro-growth issues and knows Alaska well.Dubke founded Crossroads Media and also co-founded Black Rock Group, a political consulting firm.He is something of a pioneer in the use of so-called “dark money” tax-exempt groups in politics, and one example of that took place in Alaska.Dubke worked with Alaska financier and lodge-owner Bob Gillam on an effort to stop the proposed Pebble mine in 2008.Dubke was accused of helping to route a $2 million donation from Gillam through an advocacy group to disguise the funding source for the anti-Pebble campaign.Alaska Public Offices Commission dismissed the case against Dubke as unfounded. The advocacy group paid a fine with no admission of guilt.As of Friday evening, the White House had still not announced his hiring.A communications director typically works behind the scenes to hone a president’s message and craft ways to deliver it while the press secretary –Sean Spicer – faces reporters.Share this story:last_img read more

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Nome Native Youth Olympics team holds virtual event to promote traditional games

first_imgAlaska Native Arts & Culture | Education | Northwest | SportsNome Native Youth Olympics team holds virtual event to promote traditional gamesFebruary 3, 2021 by Sophia DeSalvo, KNOM – Nome Share:During an April NYO competition in Nome, local student Elden Cross participates in the two-foot high kick, in which athletes aim to touch with their feet a sealskin beanbag at increasing heights. In this photo series, Cross reaches a height of about eight feet. (Katie Kazmierski/KNOM)Last week, the Nome Native Youth Olympics team hosted a virtual event to garner more interest region-wide in traditional games and to inspire kids to start practicing traditional games on their own.During the Kawerak-hosted hour-long event, Vanessa Tahbone shared background information about each of the events while Nome athletes gave demonstrations.“This game is used to strengthen leg muscles for jumping from ice floe to ice floe,” Tahbone said, explaining the traditional relevance of the kneel jump. “It’s for when you’re out hunting, and you need to get up and move fast.”In addition to the kneel jump, the one-foot and two-foot high kicks serve a traditional purpose as “signaling kicks” for whaling communities to communicate, as Tahbone described for viewers.“There’d be someone out on a tall lookout or a high point in the community, and they would use this to signal to the community that the crew was successful,” Tahbone said. “They would perform the one-foot high kick telling the community that they needed to get ready to help take care of and put away the food that was successfully hunted in the ocean.”Other events, like the one-handed reach, require a considerable amount of athleticism and strength. Yet, Tahbone says of the young athletes, “they make it look easy – it’s not.”The virtual event showcased eight out of the ten traditional events that encompass the Nome Native Youth Olympic Games.Tahbone stressed the group’s desire to inspire other youth in the region to get involved with NYO. With the help of Kawerak, they will be sending out at-home kits for children and families to begin practicing on their own.“The kit includes a ball, string, measuring tape, a hook to hang your ball from, and you’ll also have a log that tells you the starting heights for each event and then how you improve over time,” Tahbone said.Share this story:last_img read more

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Up and down the ladder: The latest comings and goings

first_img What is it? Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Ed Silverman Up and down the ladder: The latest comings and goings By Ed Silverman April 6, 2018 Reprints What’s included? Pharmalot Log In | Learn More center_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. GET STARTED @Pharmalot About the Author Reprints Hired someone new and exciting? Promoting a rising star? Finally solved that hard-to-fill spot? Share the news with us, and we’ll share it with others. That’s right. Send us your changes, and we’ll find a home for them. Don’t be shy. Everyone wants to know who is coming and going.And here is our regular feature in which we highlight a different person each week. This time around, we note that Surrozen hired Craig Parker as chief executive officer. Most recently, he worked at Jazz Pharmaceuticals, where he was senior vice president of corporate development. [email protected] Alex Hogan/STAT Tags jobspharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

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Royal family releases statement following explosive Prince Harry & Meghan interview

first_imgRELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Advertisement AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Buckingham Palace released a statement on behalf of Queen Elizabeth following Prince Harry and Meghan’s explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey on Sunday night.“The whole family is saddened to learn the full extent of how challenging the last few years have been for Harry and Meghan,” read the statement. “The issues raised, particularly that of race, are concerning.”“While some recollections may vary, they are taken very seriously and will be addressed by the family privately. Harry, Meghan and Archie will always be much loved family members.” Royal family members wish Archie happy birthday as he turns 2 years old May 7, 2021 Princess Diana’s wedding dress to go on public display this summer April 28, 2021 Meghan and Harry welcome baby girl, Lilibet Diana June 8, 2021 AdvertisementTags: Meghan MarklePrince HarryRoyal Family Royals William and Kate celebrate 10-year wedding anniversary with newly released photos April 30, 2021 Advertisement In their interview with Oprah, Harry and Meghan opened up about Meghan’s struggles with her mental health while she was pregnant with their son, Archie, made allegations of racism within the royal family and claimed they were denied security protection after being cut off financially. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Additional car parking spaces requested for growing Laois school

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The case for additional car parking spaces has been made for an expanding Laois school.The plight of Rath NS was raised at a recent meeting of the Graiguecullen-Portarlington Municipal District.Cllr Paschal McEvoy called on the Council to meet with management at the Ballybrittas based school to assess car parking facilities at the school.He said: “The school has become much bigger in recent times.“They need more parking and it really is a necessity now.“Perhaps we could look at removing part of the ditch or something like that to create extra space.”Area engineer Philip McVeigh agreed to the meeting.He said: “Laois County Council would be very pleased to meet with the school management to review the parking facilities at the school.” Home News Council Additional car parking spaces requested for growing Laois school NewsCouncil Facebook Pinterest Electric Picnic TAGScar parkingPaschal McEvoyRath NS Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp Additional car parking spaces requested for growing Laois school Council center_img Twitter SEE ALSO – A strong start to fundraiser launched in memory of beloved Laois man Previous articleCalls for CCTV in Laois playground as ‘mindless morons’ cause €4,000 in damageNext articleCoronavirus: 8 further deaths and 591 new cases – 27 in Laois Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Facebook Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festival Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date Mary Sweeney elected Cathaoirleach of Portlaoise Municipal District for next 12 months By Alan Hartnett – 2nd April 2021 WhatsApp Electric Picnic last_img read more

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‘Unknown number’ of foreign nationals have died in squalid Syrian camps, say rights experts

first_img‘Unknown number’ of foreign nationals have died in squalid Syrian camps, say rights experts The United Nations“An unknown number” of foreign nationals have died while being detained in squalid camps in Syria’s northeast, senior UN-appointed independent rights experts said on Monday.Citing concerns for the wives and children of extremists who have been detained in these “squalid” camps in northeast Syria, 57 unnamed countries have been urged to repatriate their nationals immediately.Leading the appeal, Fionnuala Ní Aoláin, Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights while countering terrorism, said that many western Europeans countries could do more to bring them home.Watching grandchildren starve“I think of the many grandmothers I have spoken to over the course of the last couple years, many of whom are literally watching their grandchildren starve on cellphones in western countries that refuse to return their mothers and children,” Ms. Ní Aoláin said.At the Al-Hol camp – the largest camp for refugees and internally displaced people in Syria – more than 80 per cent of those being held are women and children, according to a statement released by Ms. Ní Aoláin and more than 20 other UN rights experts, who are appointed by Member States.The situation is equally distressing in Roj camp, also in northeast Syria.Exposed to violence“Thousands of people held in the camps are exposed to violence, exploitation, abuse and deprivation in conditions and treatment that may well amount to torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment under international law, with no effective remedy at their disposal.”“An unknown number have already died because of their conditions of detention,” the experts said in a statement.Although some countries had managed to bring back their nationals, others had not, despite having “just a handful” of detainees in Syria, Ms. Ní Aoláin said.She dismissed claims that cooperation was not possible with non-State armed groups – such as the Syrian Defence Forces (SDF) – to secure their release, along with suggestions that wealthy western countries lacked the resources to rehabilitate and reintegrate all those still being held in Syria.“I would urge those countries to take back their nationals; the SDF, the ‘de facto’ authorities do not want these individuals in their camps, they are pleading for them to be taken home”, the Special Rapporteur said.‘No viable excuse’There was no reason but a lack of political will to explain why some countries with “just a handful” of detainees being held in Syria had not made more efforts to get them home, she said, adding that some States had been successful in liberating their nationals.“We have other countries including the United States which has offered and supported many of these returns, we have many other countries willing to help. There is no viable excuse other than political will that explains the lack of returns in these places.” A child walks in Roj Camp in northeast Syria.The call for urgent action follows reports of increased violence in the camps since the start of the year.Underlining Ms. Ní Aoláin’s warning that failing to help those languishing in the camps risked creating a new generation of extremists, the experts added that the sheer number of countries concerned “and the dire humanitarian conditions of the camps highlighted the need for collective, sustained and immediate action to prevent irreparable harm to the persons in vulnerable situations held there”.The experts’ joint statement also expressed concern at a ‘data collection’ process that took place in the camps last July.Questionable data grab“Highly personal and unique data were gathered from women and children in conditions where consent could not be freely given, nor under circumstances in which it was clear whom would have access to those data, and how they might be used”, they said.“We fear that this exercise was in fact aimed at identifying third country nationals who may pose a security risk, information that could be further communicated and used by States of origin, as a basis for deciding the further course of action for their nationals.This could include trial and repatriation, or children’s separation from their families, including that of male children for further detention.”Independent UN Special Rapporteurs are appointed by the Human Rights Council. They are not UN staff and do not receive a salary for their work. They are independent from any government or organization and serve in their individual capacity. /UN News Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Defence, defence force, detention, Europe, exercise, Government, grandchildren, Human Rights, Humanitarian, refugees, resources, Syria, terrorism, treatment, UN, United Stateslast_img read more

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Two “Lost Boys” From Sudan To Attend CU-Boulder This Fall

first_img Published: Aug. 18, 2002 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Their journey as refugees fleeing the brutal civil war in Sudan that claimed the lives of their families and their villages has taken them through some of the most war-torn areas of the world. Now it is bringing them to the University of Colorado at Boulder. Peter Deng, 22, and Simon Garang, 23, were forced to leave their homes in southern Sudan in 1987 when a civil war erupted between the northern and southern sections of the country. They are members of a large group of orphaned Sudanese boys who have spent much of their lives in Ethiopian and later Kenyan refugee camps and have been nicknamed the Lost Boys. According to the United Nations High Commission for Refugees, 17,000 Lost Boys originally fled Sudan, yet only 12,000 survived long enough to reach the Kakuma refugee camp in northern Kenya. Thousands of the Lost Boys have been relocated to cities all across the United States since 2000 and Deng and Garang are part of a group that now calls the Denver metro area their new home. They will be attending CU-Boulder as freshmen starting this fall. “When we first came to the United States we said to ourselves, where do we start?” said Deng. “But after we received help from CU we can see a brighter future for ourselves.” “When you get inside the buildings at CU, you realize that this is where you should be if you want to learn,” Garang said. “The people here can help you reach your objectives.” Garang worked for the United Nations High Commission for Refugees for one year while he lived in the Kenyan refugee camp. He originally thought of majoring in international affairs or international law, but now, along with Deng, is planning to major in political science. “I find myself worried about wasting time,” Garang said. “I spent nine years in a refugee camp but I don’t feel it is too late to compensate for that lost time.” Both see their education at CU-Boulder as a tremendous opportunity to work toward a better future. “With all the resources at CU, one is given the opportunity to change one’s life,” said Deng. Deng can envision working as a diplomat or a journalist, but as with Garang, he wants to use his education to help those back in refugee camps who are not as fortunate as he has been. “That experience will never leave my mind and I want to go back and help,” said Garang. Deng and Garang will be living together in an off-campus apartment and both are looking forward to college life and meeting other students. “It feels special being part of this community,” said Deng. “Because of yesterday we are Lost Boys,” Garang said. “But today is a new day and we can still bring a good tomorrow.”last_img read more

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Jane Goodall to give 50th Gamow lecture at CU-Boulder Oct. 1

first_imgSept. 10, 2015, editor’s note: Due to popular demand, this event has been moved to the Coors Events Center.Pioneering primatologist and conservationist Dr. Jane Goodall will give the 50th George Gamow Memorial Lecture on Oct. 1, 2015 at the Coors Events Center on the University of Colorado Boulder campus.The talk will be Goodall’s first in Colorado in more than two years and the only one in the Rocky Mountain and Midwest regions on her current schedule. Free tickets for the event will be made available to the public beginning Sept. 10 (see details and restrictions below). Goodall, whose landmark study of chimpanzees in Tanzania began in 1960, laid the foundation for research and redefined the relationship between humans and animals. The list of Gamow lectures includes 25 Nobel Laureates and other leading scientists.  Dr. Goodall will sign books for the public following the lecture.“I am delighted that Dr. Jane Goodall has agreed to present the 50th George Gamow Memorial Lecture,” said Dr. Paul D. Beale, chair of the Department of Physics. “She is world renowned for her pioneering research on chimpanzees in the Gombe Reserve in Tanzania. She has become an internationally leading advocate for animal rights, habitat preservation, and local peoples. Her seminal research and outstanding public communication skills make her an ideal Gamow lecturer.”Now 81, Goodall spends nearly 300 days a year on the road educating people around the world about threats facing chimpanzees, other environmental crises, and her reasons for hope that humankind will solve these problems. She is the author of 27 books and has been featured in countless documentary films. Her honors include the French Legion of Honor, the Medal of Tanzania and Japan’s prestigious Kyoto Prize. In 2002, she was appointed to serve as a United Nations Messenger of Peace and in 2003, she was named a Dame of the British Empire.  The Jane Goodall Institute, established by Goodall in 1977, continues the Gombe research and is a global leader in the effort to protect chimpanzees and their habitats. She founded Roots & Shoots with a group of Tanzanian students in 1991, through which she has connected hundreds of thousands of students in more than 130 countries who take action to make the world a better place for people, animals and the environment.The Gamow lecture series was established in 1975 to honor the late CU-Boulder physics professor and author George Gamow by bringing the world’s top scientists to campus. In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the series, “George Gamow, Gifted Physicist,” a Russian documentary film about Russian-born Gamow, will be shown on campus on Sept. 18.Jane Goodall, 50th George Gamow Memorial LectureWhen: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015Where: Coors Events Center, University of Colorado Boulder campusTickets: Check Macky or Coors websites. Limit 2 tickets per email address. Print-at-home and mobile tickets are free; fees will be assessed for will-call and mailed tickets. More information will be posted here soon. Book signing: Dr. Goodall will sign copies of her books for the public following the lecture. She cannot personalize autographs or pose for photographs due to high attendance. A selection of her books will be available for purchase before and after the lecture.Details: 2015 George Gamow Memorial Lecture with Jane GoodallPhotos: Click here for a photo of Dr. Goodall.Etc.: “George Gamow, Gifted Physicist,” a Russian documentary film, will be shown for free at 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 18 in Duane Physics room G1B20.Contact: Malinda Miller-Huey, [email protected] “I am delighted that Dr. Jane Goodall has agreed to present the 50th George Gamow Memorial Lecture,” said Dr. Paul D. Beale, chair of the Department of Physics. “She is world renowned for her pioneering research on chimpanzees in the Gombe Reserve in Tanzania. She has become an internationally leading advocate for animal rights, habitat preservation, and local peoples. Her seminal research and outstanding public communication skills make her an ideal Gamow lecturer.” Jane Goodall with rescued chimpanzee LaVielle at the Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center in the Republic of the Congo. Published: Aug. 20, 2015 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

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