Up and down the ladder: The latest comings and goings

first_img What is it? Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Ed Silverman Up and down the ladder: The latest comings and goings By Ed Silverman April 6, 2018 Reprints What’s included? Pharmalot Log In | Learn More center_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. GET STARTED @Pharmalot About the Author Reprints Hired someone new and exciting? Promoting a rising star? Finally solved that hard-to-fill spot? Share the news with us, and we’ll share it with others. That’s right. Send us your changes, and we’ll find a home for them. Don’t be shy. Everyone wants to know who is coming and going.And here is our regular feature in which we highlight a different person each week. This time around, we note that Surrozen hired Craig Parker as chief executive officer. Most recently, he worked at Jazz Pharmaceuticals, where he was senior vice president of corporate development. [email protected] Alex Hogan/STAT Tags jobspharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

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Royal family releases statement following explosive Prince Harry & Meghan interview

first_imgRELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Advertisement AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments Buckingham Palace released a statement on behalf of Queen Elizabeth following Prince Harry and Meghan’s explosive interview with Oprah Winfrey on Sunday night.“The whole family is saddened to learn the full extent of how challenging the last few years have been for Harry and Meghan,” read the statement. “The issues raised, particularly that of race, are concerning.”“While some recollections may vary, they are taken very seriously and will be addressed by the family privately. Harry, Meghan and Archie will always be much loved family members.” Royal family members wish Archie happy birthday as he turns 2 years old May 7, 2021 Princess Diana’s wedding dress to go on public display this summer April 28, 2021 Meghan and Harry welcome baby girl, Lilibet Diana June 8, 2021 AdvertisementTags: Meghan MarklePrince HarryRoyal Family Royals William and Kate celebrate 10-year wedding anniversary with newly released photos April 30, 2021 Advertisement In their interview with Oprah, Harry and Meghan opened up about Meghan’s struggles with her mental health while she was pregnant with their son, Archie, made allegations of racism within the royal family and claimed they were denied security protection after being cut off financially. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Additional car parking spaces requested for growing Laois school

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The case for additional car parking spaces has been made for an expanding Laois school.The plight of Rath NS was raised at a recent meeting of the Graiguecullen-Portarlington Municipal District.Cllr Paschal McEvoy called on the Council to meet with management at the Ballybrittas based school to assess car parking facilities at the school.He said: “The school has become much bigger in recent times.“They need more parking and it really is a necessity now.“Perhaps we could look at removing part of the ditch or something like that to create extra space.”Area engineer Philip McVeigh agreed to the meeting.He said: “Laois County Council would be very pleased to meet with the school management to review the parking facilities at the school.” Home News Council Additional car parking spaces requested for growing Laois school NewsCouncil Facebook Pinterest Electric Picnic TAGScar parkingPaschal McEvoyRath NS Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp Additional car parking spaces requested for growing Laois school Council center_img Twitter SEE ALSO – A strong start to fundraiser launched in memory of beloved Laois man Previous articleCalls for CCTV in Laois playground as ‘mindless morons’ cause €4,000 in damageNext articleCoronavirus: 8 further deaths and 591 new cases – 27 in Laois Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Facebook Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festival Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date Mary Sweeney elected Cathaoirleach of Portlaoise Municipal District for next 12 months By Alan Hartnett – 2nd April 2021 WhatsApp Electric Picnic last_img read more

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‘Unknown number’ of foreign nationals have died in squalid Syrian camps, say rights experts

first_img‘Unknown number’ of foreign nationals have died in squalid Syrian camps, say rights experts The United Nations“An unknown number” of foreign nationals have died while being detained in squalid camps in Syria’s northeast, senior UN-appointed independent rights experts said on Monday.Citing concerns for the wives and children of extremists who have been detained in these “squalid” camps in northeast Syria, 57 unnamed countries have been urged to repatriate their nationals immediately.Leading the appeal, Fionnuala Ní Aoláin, Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights while countering terrorism, said that many western Europeans countries could do more to bring them home.Watching grandchildren starve“I think of the many grandmothers I have spoken to over the course of the last couple years, many of whom are literally watching their grandchildren starve on cellphones in western countries that refuse to return their mothers and children,” Ms. Ní Aoláin said.At the Al-Hol camp – the largest camp for refugees and internally displaced people in Syria – more than 80 per cent of those being held are women and children, according to a statement released by Ms. Ní Aoláin and more than 20 other UN rights experts, who are appointed by Member States.The situation is equally distressing in Roj camp, also in northeast Syria.Exposed to violence“Thousands of people held in the camps are exposed to violence, exploitation, abuse and deprivation in conditions and treatment that may well amount to torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment under international law, with no effective remedy at their disposal.”“An unknown number have already died because of their conditions of detention,” the experts said in a statement.Although some countries had managed to bring back their nationals, others had not, despite having “just a handful” of detainees in Syria, Ms. Ní Aoláin said.She dismissed claims that cooperation was not possible with non-State armed groups – such as the Syrian Defence Forces (SDF) – to secure their release, along with suggestions that wealthy western countries lacked the resources to rehabilitate and reintegrate all those still being held in Syria.“I would urge those countries to take back their nationals; the SDF, the ‘de facto’ authorities do not want these individuals in their camps, they are pleading for them to be taken home”, the Special Rapporteur said.‘No viable excuse’There was no reason but a lack of political will to explain why some countries with “just a handful” of detainees being held in Syria had not made more efforts to get them home, she said, adding that some States had been successful in liberating their nationals.“We have other countries including the United States which has offered and supported many of these returns, we have many other countries willing to help. There is no viable excuse other than political will that explains the lack of returns in these places.” A child walks in Roj Camp in northeast Syria.The call for urgent action follows reports of increased violence in the camps since the start of the year.Underlining Ms. Ní Aoláin’s warning that failing to help those languishing in the camps risked creating a new generation of extremists, the experts added that the sheer number of countries concerned “and the dire humanitarian conditions of the camps highlighted the need for collective, sustained and immediate action to prevent irreparable harm to the persons in vulnerable situations held there”.The experts’ joint statement also expressed concern at a ‘data collection’ process that took place in the camps last July.Questionable data grab“Highly personal and unique data were gathered from women and children in conditions where consent could not be freely given, nor under circumstances in which it was clear whom would have access to those data, and how they might be used”, they said.“We fear that this exercise was in fact aimed at identifying third country nationals who may pose a security risk, information that could be further communicated and used by States of origin, as a basis for deciding the further course of action for their nationals.This could include trial and repatriation, or children’s separation from their families, including that of male children for further detention.”Independent UN Special Rapporteurs are appointed by the Human Rights Council. They are not UN staff and do not receive a salary for their work. They are independent from any government or organization and serve in their individual capacity. /UN News Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Defence, defence force, detention, Europe, exercise, Government, grandchildren, Human Rights, Humanitarian, refugees, resources, Syria, terrorism, treatment, UN, United Stateslast_img read more

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Two “Lost Boys” From Sudan To Attend CU-Boulder This Fall

first_img Published: Aug. 18, 2002 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Their journey as refugees fleeing the brutal civil war in Sudan that claimed the lives of their families and their villages has taken them through some of the most war-torn areas of the world. Now it is bringing them to the University of Colorado at Boulder. Peter Deng, 22, and Simon Garang, 23, were forced to leave their homes in southern Sudan in 1987 when a civil war erupted between the northern and southern sections of the country. They are members of a large group of orphaned Sudanese boys who have spent much of their lives in Ethiopian and later Kenyan refugee camps and have been nicknamed the Lost Boys. According to the United Nations High Commission for Refugees, 17,000 Lost Boys originally fled Sudan, yet only 12,000 survived long enough to reach the Kakuma refugee camp in northern Kenya. Thousands of the Lost Boys have been relocated to cities all across the United States since 2000 and Deng and Garang are part of a group that now calls the Denver metro area their new home. They will be attending CU-Boulder as freshmen starting this fall. “When we first came to the United States we said to ourselves, where do we start?” said Deng. “But after we received help from CU we can see a brighter future for ourselves.” “When you get inside the buildings at CU, you realize that this is where you should be if you want to learn,” Garang said. “The people here can help you reach your objectives.” Garang worked for the United Nations High Commission for Refugees for one year while he lived in the Kenyan refugee camp. He originally thought of majoring in international affairs or international law, but now, along with Deng, is planning to major in political science. “I find myself worried about wasting time,” Garang said. “I spent nine years in a refugee camp but I don’t feel it is too late to compensate for that lost time.” Both see their education at CU-Boulder as a tremendous opportunity to work toward a better future. “With all the resources at CU, one is given the opportunity to change one’s life,” said Deng. Deng can envision working as a diplomat or a journalist, but as with Garang, he wants to use his education to help those back in refugee camps who are not as fortunate as he has been. “That experience will never leave my mind and I want to go back and help,” said Garang. Deng and Garang will be living together in an off-campus apartment and both are looking forward to college life and meeting other students. “It feels special being part of this community,” said Deng. “Because of yesterday we are Lost Boys,” Garang said. “But today is a new day and we can still bring a good tomorrow.”last_img read more

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Jane Goodall to give 50th Gamow lecture at CU-Boulder Oct. 1

first_imgSept. 10, 2015, editor’s note: Due to popular demand, this event has been moved to the Coors Events Center.Pioneering primatologist and conservationist Dr. Jane Goodall will give the 50th George Gamow Memorial Lecture on Oct. 1, 2015 at the Coors Events Center on the University of Colorado Boulder campus.The talk will be Goodall’s first in Colorado in more than two years and the only one in the Rocky Mountain and Midwest regions on her current schedule. Free tickets for the event will be made available to the public beginning Sept. 10 (see details and restrictions below). Goodall, whose landmark study of chimpanzees in Tanzania began in 1960, laid the foundation for research and redefined the relationship between humans and animals. The list of Gamow lectures includes 25 Nobel Laureates and other leading scientists.  Dr. Goodall will sign books for the public following the lecture.“I am delighted that Dr. Jane Goodall has agreed to present the 50th George Gamow Memorial Lecture,” said Dr. Paul D. Beale, chair of the Department of Physics. “She is world renowned for her pioneering research on chimpanzees in the Gombe Reserve in Tanzania. She has become an internationally leading advocate for animal rights, habitat preservation, and local peoples. Her seminal research and outstanding public communication skills make her an ideal Gamow lecturer.”Now 81, Goodall spends nearly 300 days a year on the road educating people around the world about threats facing chimpanzees, other environmental crises, and her reasons for hope that humankind will solve these problems. She is the author of 27 books and has been featured in countless documentary films. Her honors include the French Legion of Honor, the Medal of Tanzania and Japan’s prestigious Kyoto Prize. In 2002, she was appointed to serve as a United Nations Messenger of Peace and in 2003, she was named a Dame of the British Empire.  The Jane Goodall Institute, established by Goodall in 1977, continues the Gombe research and is a global leader in the effort to protect chimpanzees and their habitats. She founded Roots & Shoots with a group of Tanzanian students in 1991, through which she has connected hundreds of thousands of students in more than 130 countries who take action to make the world a better place for people, animals and the environment.The Gamow lecture series was established in 1975 to honor the late CU-Boulder physics professor and author George Gamow by bringing the world’s top scientists to campus. In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the series, “George Gamow, Gifted Physicist,” a Russian documentary film about Russian-born Gamow, will be shown on campus on Sept. 18.Jane Goodall, 50th George Gamow Memorial LectureWhen: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015Where: Coors Events Center, University of Colorado Boulder campusTickets: Check Macky or Coors websites. Limit 2 tickets per email address. Print-at-home and mobile tickets are free; fees will be assessed for will-call and mailed tickets. More information will be posted here soon. Book signing: Dr. Goodall will sign copies of her books for the public following the lecture. She cannot personalize autographs or pose for photographs due to high attendance. A selection of her books will be available for purchase before and after the lecture.Details: 2015 George Gamow Memorial Lecture with Jane GoodallPhotos: Click here for a photo of Dr. Goodall.Etc.: “George Gamow, Gifted Physicist,” a Russian documentary film, will be shown for free at 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 18 in Duane Physics room G1B20.Contact: Malinda Miller-Huey, [email protected] “I am delighted that Dr. Jane Goodall has agreed to present the 50th George Gamow Memorial Lecture,” said Dr. Paul D. Beale, chair of the Department of Physics. “She is world renowned for her pioneering research on chimpanzees in the Gombe Reserve in Tanzania. She has become an internationally leading advocate for animal rights, habitat preservation, and local peoples. Her seminal research and outstanding public communication skills make her an ideal Gamow lecturer.” Jane Goodall with rescued chimpanzee LaVielle at the Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center in the Republic of the Congo. Published: Aug. 20, 2015 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

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10 Things to Do This Week: Student session with Google’s Abigail Posner, free movies, more

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: March 4, 2019 This week brings a new art exhibit, Bollyfit dance class, the Graduate Program Open House, free lunch from Snarf’s, Hebrew Schmooze-A-Palooza, an LGBTQ-Friendly Employer + Student Mixer and more.Monday, March 4Documenting Change: Our Climate (Past, Present, Future) Now through July 20  CU Art Museum Visit the CU Art Museum and check out the new exhibit exploring the space where art and the natural world meet. The exhibit, Documenting Change: Our Climate (Past, Present, Future), showcases 70 artworks from 31 artists.Bollyfit Bollywood Dancing 8–9 p.m.  Rec Center, Studio 2This unique style of dance will give you a great workout! Bollyfit is a free class that teaches contemporary Indian dance: a fusion of classical, hip-hop, jazz, Bollywood and Western concert dance forms. No prior experience needed. Come enjoy a night of Bollywood dancing, upbeat music and fun.Tuesday, March 5Graduate Program Open House 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. UMC Glenn Miller Ballroom Come learn about graduate education at the CU Boulder. Graduate program representatives including Graduate Program Advisors (GPAs), program directors, faculty members and current graduate students will be available to answer questions about graduate programs, research opportunities, funding, and more. Snacks and refreshments will be provided.Wednesday, March 6Student session: Leo Hill Leadership Speaker Series with Abigail Posner 8:30–10 a.m.  Wolf Law, Wittemyer Courtroom You’re invited to attend a student-focused presentation and Q&A opportunity with Abigail Posner, head of strategy for Google’s Brand Unit. Continental breakfast available at 8:30 a.m. with program beginning at 9 a.m.The Herd: Welcome Wednesday 11 a.m. to 2p.m.  Koenig Alumni Center Stop by for a free lunch from Snarf’s. If you’re a Herd member, make sure to have your Herd app downloaded for giveaways.Hebrew Schmooze-A-Palooza 6 p.m.  Old Main Theater​ Come sing, laugh and connect with fellow Hebrew lovers! This free concert features music and dance performances by students in CU Boulder’s Hebrew language classes. The evening will feature diverse Israeli music from rap and pop to rock’n’roll and a Hebrew jig.Thursday, March 7LGBTQ-Friendly Employer + Student Mixer 5:30–7 p.m.  UMC Aspen RoomNetwork with local companies who have LGBTQ resource groups! Connect with employers who are eager to share information about their company’s culture, possible job openings and inclusivity practices and policies. CU Boulder Alum Nick Sophinos will share some tips on the job search process, searching for LGBTQ-friendly work environments and finding community in the workplace.Need more things to do? Campus Events CalendarFriday, March 8CU on Friday 4–6 p.m.  The ConnectionMark your calendars! Kick off the month of March and join your fellow Buffs for a fun-filled night of free cookie decorating, pizza, bowling, billiards and VR! This month’s theme is Luck o’ the Buffs. Captain Marvel screening 5:40–8:40 p.m.  Century TheatreJoin the Center for Inclusion & Social Change in celebrating Women’s HERstory Month on International Women’s Day with a screening of the new Captain Marvel movie! Use your Buff OneCard to pick up a free ticket at C4C N320.Friday Night Films: Mary Queen of Scots 8–11 p.m.  Chem 140Looking for a relaxing way to spend your Friday night? Come join the CU Program Council and watch Josie Rourke’s historical drama about the medieval conflict between Mary, Queen of Scots, and her cousin, Queen Elizabeth I. Free admission and popcorn!Categories:Things to DoCampus Communitylast_img read more

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The Largest Restaurant in Town

first_img Email Five days a week throughout the school year, the Kalispell Public Schools Food Service dishes out almost 4,500 meals to students in 11 schools, making it the largest restaurant in town. This year the program is trying to improve those students’ diets one meal at a time.Under new director Jenny Montague, the Food Service is being revamped with a healthier, homemade mindset. Gone are the frequent days of nacho cheese, Pop-Tarts and corn dogs. Goodbye trans fatty acids, highly processed foods and sources of high sodium, sugar and fructose corn syrup. Welcome fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and regional meats, an unlimited salad bar, real juice and smoothies, and yogurt parfaits for breakfast.Montague, 30, believes cafeterias are an important setting for students just like classrooms. She approaches her food program the same way a teacher does a class, working with the staff of 45 food servers to educate students about what they’re eating and emphasizing the importance of a healthy diet.“Serving unhealthy food is not what this country needs,” Montague said. “Initially the school lunch program was started because kids were starving during the Depression. At this point, they’re starving for nutrients, but not more calories.”The Food Service program serves all elementary, middle and high schools in the Kalispell district, plus Olney-Bissell and Trinity Lutheran.“I think there’s such an opportunity in the schools,” she said. “We’re teaching other things – we should also be teaching healthy eating.”With a graduate degree in nutritional and sustainable food systems, Montague is hoping to cook more meals from scratch and with local products. In a presentation she gave to the school board recently, Montague outlined these goals in detail and sought to dispel a few myths about changing the system, namely that buying local and cooking from scratch is more expensive.“Food costs can come down with more home cooking,” she told school board members. “If you do it correctly your costs can be equal or lower.”Montague says the option to buy local or regional food is becoming more economical as high gas prices are raising the cost of transporting food. Last year, the cost of bringing in out-of-state food rose 18 percent, she said. And as the local food movement grows, there’s more quantity, which Montague hopes will lower prices.There are healthier, more local items on Montague’s mind that are currently expensive, like beef, making it harder to source. One of Montague’s “major goals” is getting rid of stockyard beef all together and using Montana beef, but “it’s really quite a ways down the line because it’s expensive right now.”So far this year Montague and her staff have overhauled the district-wide menu with new recipes, like ham or turkey wraps, hummus with pita bread, and tacos made with protein-rich beans. Montague hopes by next year to have 30 percent of the food served in schools cooked from scratch and to be 15 percent Montana products. Within three years, she hopes that half the food is cooked from scratch and 30 percent comes from in-state.“I think that’s something we’ve needed to do for a long time,” Pam Bauer, a longtime server at Edgerton Elementary School, said. “It’s just better for everybody and it keeps our money local.”Bauer is one of 45 servers in the district, and a vital piece to the program’s success, Montague said.“Everyone who works for the food service program is doing the job because they want to help feed kids,” she said. “They give 110 percent to keep that vision going.”One such person is Terry Caudill, a longtime staple in the program and at Kalispell Middle School. Caudill retired from the Food Service at the end of October after 19 years. Caudill has battled lupus, which recently came out of remission, and her doctor recommended she stop working. A large gathering was held at KMS to celebrate and honor her for the passion she has brought to serving meals to kids for almost 20 years.“It’s hard to say goodbye,” Caudill said. “It’s been an awesome experience. The kids are the main thing for me. It’s fun to go out and the kids say, ‘lunch lady!’”Caudill said she was motivated all those years to get up early in the morning and start prepping meals for one simple reason.“Sometimes that’s their best meal they will get all day,” she said.The Food Service is funded solely by federal money and the amount is based on the number of meals served. Annually the program receives roughly $100,000 worth of food.There was a 7 percent increase in meals served in August and September compared to 2010, which could be attributed to either students’ favorable opinions of the meals or the high number of enrollments across the city’s elementary schools, or a combination of both.Because of the tight budget, Montague knows change will be hard to come by, which is why she and two students in the Farm to School program at Flathead Valley Community College are filling out as many national grants as they can.“It is really hard to get the quality you want out of the budget we have,” Montague says.Another challenge is the central kitchen and its outdated equipment, a concern Montague has discussed with the school board. The main entrees served at schools are made in the basement of Flathead High School, where the central kitchen is located.Montague said several sections of the kitchen have been shut down and condemned because of asbestos and because plumbing has collapsed. Most of the cooking equipment is out of date and unable to be used to cook from scratch. And once food is made, there is no ramp for trucks to pull up to, so pallets are loaded and sent up ramps in an untimely fashion.Instead of letting those challenges deter her, Montague is finding a way to work around them while hoping a new kitchen arrives in the near future.Her motivation is simple. Montague is a Kalispell native and has a young daughter of her own. In other words, she cares about her daughter’s health and the health of her hometown.“I definitely am invested because it is my home; it definitely plays a role in my emotional investment,” she said. “This is an area that I think is ripe for change. A lot of these changes are easy to make and totally sensible.”As a way to gather input and helpful ideas for the program, Montague is planning a community meeting in January for those interested in healthy foods in schools. For more information, contact her at [email protected] Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox.last_img read more

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The Regional Mobility Fund for Experts in the Black Sea Region and the Balkans

first_img LinkedIn 0 Deadline: ongoingOpen to: civil society, think tank and academic experts from the Black Sea and the Balkans (non-EU)Grant: mobility costs for conferences, seminars, working and coordination meetings, study visits, mentoring and training activitiesDescriptionThe Regional Mobility Fund for Experts in the Black Sea Region and the Balkans is initiated by the Romanian NGDO Platform – FOND with the financial support of CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness – CPDE. This pilot activity was implemented during the period 5 October 2015 – 1 December 2015 and is now extended for the period 3 February 2016 – 31 March 2016.The Regional Mobility Fund is part of the follow-up activities of the Black Sea NGO Forum organised by FOND with the support of the European Commission, Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness – CPDE.The objective of the Regional Mobility Fund is to encourage the mobility of civil society/ think tank/ academic experts in the region as to foster knowledge sharing, expertise and exchange of best practices within the framework of enabling environment for CSOs and the Istanbul Principles.EligibilityThe Regional Mobility Fund is open to civil society, think tank and academic experts from the following regions: the Black Sea and the Balkans (non-EU).GrantThe Mobility Fund will cover mobility costs (transport, accommodation and meals) for conferences, seminars, working and coordination meetings, study visits, mentoring and training activities in which the applicants are resource persons, within the framework of enabling environment for CSOs and the Istanbul Principles.How to apply?The application process for the Regional Mobility Fund is flexible, as the receipt and assessment of the requests for support will be done in an ongoing manner. The only time constraint is that the activity for which one applies should be implemented during the period 3 February – 31 March 2016.If you need any other information, please do no hesitate to contact them at: [email protected] more information please visit the official website. Similar Stories Tweet +1 ← Global Good Fund Fellowship for Social Entrepreneurs Reddit Share 0center_img February 29, 2016 Published by Gorica Leave a Reply Cancel ReplyYou must be logged in to post a comment. The Regional Mobility Fund for Experts in the Black Sea Region and the Balkans Islamic Traditions and Muslim Societies in World Contexts,USA European Summer School on Prejudices, Genocide, Remembrance → Pocketlast_img read more

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G20 countries set to invest over $1.6tn in ‘fossil gas,’ jeopardising…

first_imgFeatured image: Stock New analysis finds G20 countries are investing heavily in fossil gas in direct contradiction  with Paris Agreement goals they have agreed to, according to a report titled ‘Debunked: The G20 Clean Gas Myth’.The report finds that G20 countries, in the absence of new policies, are set to see investment of over $1.6 trillion in new gas projects. If this investment takes place – and if Argentina’s Vaca Muerta shale gas reserves are developed – it would seriously jeopardise the climate goals set out in the Paris Agreement.Paul Horsman, Greenpeace Andino Project Leader commented: “Opening more oil, gas and coal reserves condemns the world to more deadly climate impacts. Governments should take responsibility, keep to their Paris Agreement pledges, and stop spending billions of dollars to open even more reserves that neglect the rights of citizens and the environment. People are already paying with their lives and livelihoods for oil and gas extraction, only a shift to massively expand renewable energy sources will guarantee economic success and protect us and our children.”Published by Oil Change International and endorsed by over 20 organisations around the world, the report findings include:The concept of fossil gas as a “bridge fuel” to a stable climate is a myth. Emissions from existing gas fields, alongside existing oil and coal development, already exceed carbon budgets aligned with the Paris Agreement. Even if all coal mines were shut down tomorrow, the gas and oil in already-developed fields alone would take the world beyond the carbon budget for a 50% chance at staying below 1.5ºC of global warming.Despite this reality, G20 countries are projected to host investment of over $1.6 trillion in new gas projects by 2030. If this happens, emissions unlocked through 2050 would make it extremely difficult to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement, which has been signed by all G20 members.Stephen Kretzmann, Executive Director of Oil Change International, commented: “The idea that fossil gas could be a bridge to clean energy dates back to the time when cell phones were tethered to briefcase-size batteries. Fossil gas today is just one more dirty energy source now completely bypassed by newer, cleaner, cheaper, and better technology. It’s time for the G20 to follow through on their commitment to end fossil fuel subsidies, and to begin to discuss how to limit production of all fossil fuels in line with the Paris Agreement’s goals.”Five countries – the United States, Russia, Australia, China, and Canada – are projected to be responsible for 75% of capital expenditures in gas production in G20 countries from 2018-2030.Argentina’s push to open massive shale gas deposits to investment risks undermining its commitment to the Paris Agreement and the work of the Energy Transitions Working Group during its G20 Presidency.Lidy Nacpil, Coordinator of the Asian Peoples’ Movement on Debt and Development commented: “The world does not have the time nor the space to use gas as bridge or transition fuel. We need to fully decarbonise by 2050 if we are to have a good chance of preventing the climate crisis from reaching catastrophic levels. And that means phasing out the use of all fossil fuels as fast as possible. Those who argue for stepping up production and consumption of gas in the transition are either conveniently ignorant of the science or are deliberately deceptive.”Dr. Katherine Kramer, Climate Change Global Lead of Christian Aid said: “The G20 presents an opportunity for economically powerful countries to debunk the dangerous myth that fossil gas can act as a bridging fuel to a low carbon future. Fossil gas is a false solution, all the more egregious when there are sustainable renewable sources of energy that are cost-effective and provide energy access for the poorest people through using indigenous wind and solar. Why ‘bridge’ when you can leapfrog to truly clean energy?”Download ‘Debunked: The G20 Clean Gas Myth’.A partner report, ‘Debunked: The Promise of Argentina’s Vaca Muerta Shale Play,’ published by Greenpeace in Argentina, focuses on the myths surrounding the development of shale gas in Argentina, particularly the Vaca Muerta shale play. AFD and Eskom commit to a competitive electricity sector BRICS Finance and Policy Low carbon, solar future could increase jobs in the future – SAPVIA RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Generation TAGSG20 countriesnatural gas Previous articleEgypt: Ministry to announce revised tariff structureNext articleWorld Bank provides funding for Morocco’s Noor-Midelt complex Ashley TheronAshley Theron-Ord is based in Cape Town, South Africa at Clarion Events-Africa. She is the Senior Content Producer across media brands including ESI Africa, Smart Energy International, Power Engineering International and Mining Review Africa. UNDP China, CCIEE launch report to facilitate low-carbon developmentlast_img read more

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