Apple pushes green power in China

first_img Joseph Waring Author Rakuten Mobile losses widen on capex surge Asia AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 22 OCT 2015 Related HomeAsiaNews Apple pushes green power in China Tags center_img Foxconn predicts continued gains Apple is taking steps to make its operations in China more environmentally friendly, with plans to build solar power plants and encourage its manufacturing suppliers to use more renewable energy.Apple announced plans today to build solar energy projects with a capacity of 200 megawatts (MW) in the northern, eastern and southern regions, while iPhone supplier Hon Hai Precision, also know as Foxconn, said it will add solar power plants with a capacity of 400MW in Henan province by 2018. Apple said Foxconn has committed to generating as much clean energy as its Zhengzhou factory consumes in producing the iPhone.Apple’s longer-term plan is to partner with suppliers in China to install more than 2 gigawatts of new clean energy in the coming years.The company also announced the completion of 40MW of solar projects in Sichuan province, which it built with SunPower. It claims these solar installations produce more than the total amount of electricity used by its offices and retail stores in China, making Apple’s operations carbon neutral.Environmental groups in China have complained that its suppliers are heavy polluters and Apple has failed to address the problem.The programmes, the company said, will avoid over 20 million metric tons of greenhouse gas pollution in the country between now and 2020, equivalent to taking nearly four million passenger vehicles off the road for one year. Joseph Waring joins Mobile World Live as the Asia editor for its new Asia channel. Before joining the GSMA, Joseph was group editor for Telecom Asia for more than ten years. In addition to writing features, news and blogs, he… Read more Foxconn ventures into chips with new JV Previous ArticleIndia’s DoT opts not to boost spectrum capsNext ArticleSKT, Ericsson claim 5G network slicing success AppleChinaFoxconniPhonerenewable energysolar powerlast_img read more

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Coronavirus live updates: Mass shutdowns, HHS hit with cyber attack

first_imgjarun011/iStock(NEW YORK) — Major cities are shutting down restaurants to try to stop the spread of the novel coronavirus, which has killed at least 68 people in the United States.There are at least 3,774 confirmed cases in the country. COVID-19 has reached 49 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico.Globally, there are more than 174,000 coronavirus cases and more than 6,700 deaths, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University.Here’s how the news is unfolding Monday. All times Eastern:10:45 a.m.: New York City to limit all restaurants, states work togetherNew York City will close all nightclubs, movie theaters and concert venues as of Tuesday morning.All restaurants, bars and cafes will be limited to food take-out and delivery.“Our city is facing an unprecedented threat, and we must respond with a wartime mentality,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said.New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo told “Good Morning America” Monday that the U.S. has “been behind this disease from day one. We saw the disease developing in China back in November. We weren’t ready for it, and we’ve been playing catchup ever since.”“The wave is going to break on the hospital system,” he warned. “We don’t have the capacity to build more hospitals quickly. The only way would be if the army corps of engineers came in, worked with the states to retrofit existing buildings.”Cuomo said the “federal government has to get more engaged.”“There’s been no country that has handled this that has not nationalized it. This patchwork quilt of policies doesn’t work,” he said. “It makes no sense for me to do something in New York and New Jersey to do something else.”Cuomo then banded together with the governors of New Jersey and Connecticut Monday as they said their states would abide by the same rules for closures.Following the CDC guidelines the three states will prohibit gatherings of 50 people or more. Supermarkets, medical offices and other essential services are able to remain open beyond 8 p.m. but must adhere to social distancing policies“This is a virus that knows no borders,” Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont said.The governors said they believed this is the first region in the country to announce joint closure policies. The governors, all Democrats, said they were forced to act because of a lack of coordination from the federal government.10:01 a.m.: Egypt halting all flightsEgypt is halting all domestic and international flights beginning Thursday, a government spokesman told ABC News.The announcement was made now to give tourists time to leave the country, cabinet spokesman Hany Younes said. “They are free to stay for as long as they want, but there will be no flights until March 31,” Younes said.9:45 a.m. Trading temporarily halted as markets plummet despite Fed interventionTrading on Wall Street was temporarily halted after markets plunged early Monday as the novel coronavirus outbreak continues to upend business and travel across the world. The Dow Jones Industrial Average plummeted more than 2,250 points or 9.7% just after trading began. The S&P 500 fell more than 8%, triggering a “circuit-breaker” halt of 15 minutes.The major sell-off comes even after the Federal Reserve made a surprise announcement on Sunday that it’s slashing interest rates to near zero and spending $700 billion to buy Treasury and mortgage bonds to help buoy the economy during the coronavirus pandemic.The intervention did not appear to be enough to quell investors’ worries about the economic impacts of the outbreak on businesses. Local governments including in New York and Los Angeles announced over the weekend they were shuttering businesses such as bars and entertainment venues. 9:37 a.m. New York City to limit all restaurants to take-out and deliveryNew York City will close all nightclubs, movie theaters and concert venues as of Tuesday morning. Also, all restaurants, bars and cafes will be limited to food take-out and delivery. “Our city is facing an unprecedented threat, and we must respond with a wartime mentality,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said.New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo told ABC News’ Good Morning America Monday that the U.S. has “been behind this disease from day one. We saw the disease developing in China back in November. We weren’t ready for it, and we’ve been playing catchup ever since.” “The wave is going to break on the hospital system,” he warned. “We don’t have the capacity to build more hospitals quickly. The only way would be if the army corps of engineers came in, worked with the states to retrofit existing buildings.” Cuomo said the “federal government has to get more engaged.” “There’s been no country that has handled this that has not nationalized it. This patchwork quilt of policies doesn’t work,” he said. “It makes no sense for me to do something in New York and New Jersey to do something else.” 9:31 a.m. Peace Corps evacuating all volunteersThe Peace Corps is suspending all activities around the world, evacuating its volunteers from dozens of countries, the organization announced Sunday night.9:22 a.m. Health and Human Services experiences cyber attackThe Department of Health and Human Services experienced a cyber attack Sunday night related to it’s coronavirus response, administration sources told ABC News. The attempt was to slow down operations, according to sources. The nature and origin of the attack is still under investigation.8:18 a.m. NBA star on the ‘scariest part about this virus’Utah Jazz player Donovan Mitchell, one of several NBA players who tested positive for COVID-19, has no symptoms, he told Good Morning America Monday.“If you were to tell me I could play in a seven-game series tomorrow, I would be ready to lace up,” he said. “I’m blessed that’s the case.” Mitchell spoke to GMA anchor Robin Roberts via video Monday as he self isolates.“I don’t have any symptoms — I could walk down the street. If it wasn’t public knowledge that I was sick, you wouldn’t know it,” Mitchell said. “I think that’s the scariest part about this virus — you may seem fine, be fine, and you never know who you may be talking to, who they’re going home to.”7:28 a.m. Stock futures pointing down at least 5%As it stands, stock futures are pointing down 5%. They’re “limit down” which means that they have hit their limit and can’t go any lower until markets open.“Limit down” is similar to circuit breakers when the market is open to keep stocks from heading into free fall. Stocks are expected to fall even further as there are exchange-traded funds (ETFs) which mimic the S&P 500 which are down around 9% right now.The first circuit breaker kicks in if S&P 500 falls 7%.7:16 a.m. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo tells ABC News that federal assistance and a unified approach is needed to take on coronavirus“Look, we have been behind this disease from day one. We saw the disease developing in China back in November. We weren’t ready for it, and we’ve been playing catchup ever since,” Cuomo told George Stephanopoulos on Good Morning America.Cuomo continued: “You have to get ahead of this, right? It’s not fighting the last war, it’s fighting the next war. The next war is going to be overwhelming our hospital systems. You look at any of these projections and you see that coming. When you see that chart of the curve, I see it as a wave and the wave is going to break on the hospital system. We don’t have the capacity to build more hospitals quickly. The only way would be if the army corps of engineers came in, worked with the states to retrofit existing buildings.”Cuomo also railed against what he called the “patchwork quilt” approach has so far allowed to go on.“This federal government has to get more engaged,” Cuomo said. “There’s been no country that has handled this that has not nationalized it. This patchwork quilt of policies doesn’t work. It makes no sense for me to do something in New York and New Jersey to do something else.”Said Cuomo: “If I say you can’t go to a bar in New York, you know you’ll go to New Jersey, you’ll go to Connecticut, you’ll go to wherever you can be served. That’s the last thing we want. Set the national standards and let’s live with them. Otherwise, again, you come up with this ad hoc system that’s not going to work.”7:10 a.m. China relaxes travel restrictions in HubeiChina is relaxing travel restrictions in the hardest-hit virus province of Hubei and sending thousands of workers back to jobs at factories desperate to get production going again.The move comes as Chinese officials say the outbreak that spread from Wuhan starting in December has mostly run its course domestically, while they remain vigilant against imported cases.5:30 a.m. Jack Ma says first shipment of masks and coronavirus test kits to the US is taking off from ShanghaiJack Ma tweeted that a huge shipment of masks and coronavirus testing kits is now en route to the United States from Shanghai.The first shipment of masks and coronavirus test kits to the US is taking off from Shanghai. All the best to our friends in America. pic.twitter.com/LTn26gvlOl— Jack Ma (@JackMa) March 16, 2020The shipment is said to contain 500,000 coronavirus testing kits and one million masks. Ma has urged international cooperation to fight the health crisis.5:13 a.m. Russia closes borders with BelarusRussia has announced it is closing its border with Belarus, one of its major entry points to Europe, in response to the coronavirus outbreak. Goods will still be allowed to cross the border, but the passage of people will no longer be permitted.Substantial restrictions of flights to Europe from Russia also begin today. All flights to European Union countries, Norway and Switzerland are to be halted, except for those leaving from a single terminal at one of Moscow’s airports and flying to the countries’ capitals. Currently only two of Russia’s borders have no restrictions linked to the virus — Finland and Azerbaijan.It comes as Russia steps up its measures in an attempt to contain the spread of the virus.4:36 a.m. Roche Diagnostics has received emergency approval for a new coronavirus test it developedThe company received emergency approval late Thursday night from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to send half a million tests to labs across the country from its North America headquarters in Indianapolis.“For us, it’s been all about how do we make sure the patients who need to test, get the test at the time they need it,” Randy Pritchard, senior vice president of marketing for Roche, said.In six weeks, the company was able to develop the test when it normally takes about 18 months to identify a virus and submit something to the FDA, Pritchard said.With the new test, you can have results as fast as three days as opposed to days with some current tests.3:53 a.m. Australian TV journalist who met with Rita Wilson has virusAn Australian television journalist said Monday he has the new coronavirus and assumes he contracted it while meeting with actress-singer Rita Wilson in Sydney.Nine Network entertainment editor Richard Wilkins, 65, said he was tested because he met Wilson at the Sydney Opera House on March 7 and again at Nine’s Sydney studio on March 9. The result came back positive on Sunday.“I’m surprisingly very well,” Wilkins told Nine by Facetime from his Sydney home, where he has self-isolated since Wilson’s diagnosis.“You could’ve knocked me over with a feather last night when I got that call. It took me a couple of minutes to reel from the news that they gave me. But I feel fine. I feel 100%,” Wilkins added. “We’re assuming this is from Rita. It may not be. They’ve all said it could be anyone, anywhere, any time, such is the prevalence of this thing.”Wilson and her husband Tom Hanks have been isolated in an Australian hospital since they were both diagnosed with COVID-19 on March 12.3:20 a.m. Santa Monica closes pier due to public safety concernsSanta Monica has issued an executive order to temporarily close the Santa Monica Pier to the public as part of its local emergency proclamation beginning at 6 a.m. on Monday, according to a statement from Santa Monica officials.“We welcome thousands of guests to our Pier each and every day, so we take this step out of the deepest desire to keep people at home and healthy,” said City Manager Rick Cole. “We love our Pier and the joy it brings to everyone that visits, but in this moment, we must take aggressive actions to slow the spread of COVID-19.”The City team is closely monitoring CDC, State, and County Health Department guidance to determine when and/or how the Pier can be reopened to the public.“We are in full support of this temporary closure to the public amid this health crisis. Though this will heavily impact the Pier businesses, in this historic moment it is the right thing to do,” said Negin Singh, executive director of the Santa Monica Pier Corporation. “We know that once we overcome the COVID-19 pandemic, our Pier will play an important role in serving the public with our great food, attractions, performers and free, world-class events. We all look forward to welcoming you back.”12:21 a.m. Washington to shut down bars, eliminate in-person diningWashington state is following the national trend shuttering entertainment venues and recreational facilities, and limiting restaurants to delivery and take-out.Gov. Jay Inslee released a statement Sunday night local time announcing that he will sign the statewide proclamation on Monday.The ban will not apply to grocery stores and pharmacies, although other retail outlets will have reduced occupancy, the statement said.“These are very difficult decisions, but hours count here and very strong measures are necessary to slow the spread of the disease,” Inslee said.Washington’s King Country, which includes the county seat of Seattle, has been one of the centers of the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S.12:11 a.m. Los Angeles closing bars, clubs and gymsLos Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti announced that the city will be closing bars, nightclubs, entertainment venues and gyms until at least March 31.Restaurants will remain open only for takeout and delivery.The order extends to libraries, recreation centers and zoos.Grocery stores, pharmacies and food banks will remain open, the mayor said. In addition, the announcement included a moratorium on evictions for renters.The executive order, which came an hour after New York City made a similar announcement, puts the United States’ two largest cities under unprecedented restrictions during a national health crisis.The Los Angeles closures go into effect Sunday at midnight local time.“This will be a tough time, but it is not forever. Angelenos have always risen to meet difficult moments, and we will get through this together,” Garcetti said in a statement.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Italian on Mou’s Spurs staff

first_img Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/ Italian analyst Giovanni Cerra has been confirmed as a member of Jose Mourinho’s backroom staff at Tottenham Hotspur. Mourinho officially took charge of Tottenham earlier today, and he will once more work with Cerra in North London. The Roman was technical analyst at Manchester United between 2016 and 2018 – a position he will again fill for the ex-Inter boss. Prior to that, he worked as lead visual designer for Chelsea from July 2013 to July 2016. His role as technical analyst entails turning scouting data and game plans into charts and images, making them easier for players to understand. However, little is known about him in his native Italy, where he has yet to work for a professional club.last_img read more

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Obama email team reveals what worked – and didn’t – in election fundraising

first_imgM+R had a fascinating post* last week about political fundraising. It highlighted insights from the digital team who sent out fundraising emails for the Obama campaign. While political fundraising is its own animal, I do think many of these insights apply to all forms of fundraising. So whether you’re a political activist or a nonprofit fundraiser, or of the red or blue or purple persuasion, you will find this interesting.(The whole post is here. These are some highlights along with my commentary.)1. It’s hard to predict what will work – so testing matters. There were 18 very smart people on the email team alone, and they often predicted the wrong winners among versions of emails. And just when they figured out what worked, it stopped working. So they tested again. Keep testing!2. The best segmentation was based on what donors did – not how they voted or their demographics. Segmenting their message according to the ways people responded worked far better in yielding strong fundraising results than any other variable. What have people donated in the past? In response to which appeals? Segment accordingly.3. Length didn’t seem to matter a lot, until the end of the campaign, when shorter did better (reminds me of my advice to write very short appeals on December 31!). What did matter was the content and relevance of the message.4. For fundraising, setting a big goal for number of donations worked, but little, very local goals (we need six more donors in Washington, DC) did not. Those only worked for advocacy. Interesting. Something to test?And my favorite finding? The best appeals also had the highest unsubscribe rates. Like Mark Rovner always says, evoking passion means you get strong opinions on all sides. Bland is safe – and gets NO reaction.For more findings, check out the full post, “Surprises from Obama’s New Media Staff.”*Hat tip to Jono Smith of Event360 for sharing the post.last_img read more

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How to Create a Nonprofit Editorial Calendar

first_imgCreating an editorial calendar is an effective way to keep your organization’s newsletter, website, blog, and social media content fresh and current. Should you go with paper or something more high tech? Use whatever works best for you and your team: a wall calendar, Excel spreadsheet, Google Calendar, or even dedicated project management software. While it can contain loads of info, an editorial calendar at its most basic organizes the what, when, and who of your media outreach. Here’s a quick primer on how to create an editorial calendar that’ll keep your team on track and your online presence fresh. Next: Fill in the Blanks Now that you have the basic framework of your nonprofit’s content needs, you can start filling your calendar with detailed information about each item, such as the specific topic of a blog post or Facebook update. A typical week might look something like this: First: Answer What, When, and Who?Create a broad outline of your organization’s content needs. This process includes answering “what, when, and who?” WHAT types of media do you publish? Make a list of the different ways your nonprofit communicates with constituents. The options are endless, but here are a few ideas: Website: Message from the executive director, volunteer opportunities, upcoming events. Blog: Posts about recent events, fundraising campaigns, awards your nonprofit received, success stories, current issues affecting your cause. Email: Newsletters, campaign updates, event invitations. Facebook: Polls, success stories, links to blog posts or videos, contests, photos from the field, “volunteer of the week” profiles. Twitter: Links to blog posts, event announcements, requests for volunteers. YouTube: Videos from events, fieldwork, success stories. WHEN is the deadline? Look at your “what” list and decide how often to update each item. Maybe you’ll revamp your homepage content once a month, publish a new blog post every Monday, send an email newsletter on the 15th of each month, post to Facebook every weekday morning, and so on. WHO is the writer? Decide who on your team is responsible for creating and delivering each of the various pieces. Also, be sure to assign a team member or two to social media duties so someone is always available to interact with fans. Homepage:Joe T., 10am.Update events sidebar, volunteer opportunities Big-Picture Benefits Save your old calendars! Editorial calendars are great for more than just planning ahead. Over time, you’ll find them useful for reviewing what topics you’ve covered and when. This can help you avoid duplicating content or remind you to update your constituents on, say, a past event, contest, or campaign. You might also include data on published content like page views or click-through rates to see which pieces were most effective. When it comes right down to it, an editorial calendar is just a super-organized to-do list that encourages engagement as your supporters keep coming back to your online channels to find out what’s new and exciting at your nonprofit. Tuesday Thursday Friday Facebook:Gina K., 10am.Link to new YouTube video Facebook:Gina K., 10am.Friday Fan Giveaway: Mug Blog:Ann S., noon.Beagle Boogie gala recap (link on Twitter) YouTube:Joe T., EOD.Ribbon cutting and tour of new kennels and dog run. Fundraising Takeaways Your editorial calendar can be as simple or complex as you like, but it should at least answer the questions what, when, and who. Organizing all the elements of your media outreach into one editorial calendar helps you keep content fresh and up to date. Readers will respond by coming back more often to see what’s new at your nonprofit. Review your old editorial calendars to make sure you aren’t repeating content or that you’ve updated readers when necessary. They’re also useful for tracking which content was most successful. Facebook:Gina K., 10am.Pic from dog adoption fair Email NL (biweekly):Ann S., 10am.Dog adoption, Beagle Bingo event, request for supplies, link to donation page (post pdf on FB, link on Twitter) This is, of course, a very basic editorial calendar, but it’s an easy place to begin. Yours could include more or fewer items, more or less detail, checkboxes to indicate approvals or stages of production, and so on. Expect your calendar to evolve as your needs change. Wednesday Facebook: Gina K, 10am.Volunteer of the Week: Ellen Jones Facebook:Gina K., 10am.Meet the Staff: Joe T. Website:Mary M., EOD.Monthly message from executive director Mondaylast_img read more

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It’s time to get your social strategy in order

first_imgIf you’re still not sure what your organization should be doing with social media, it would be a good idea to figure it out soon. As social media use continues to grow, this channel is becoming even more important to online donors as a way to connect with causes and find news and information.Here are some social media fun facts: Free WebinarWant some help with your nonprofit’s social media strategy? Nonprofit communication expert Farra Trompeter of Big Duck will join us on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 at 1pm EDT for a free Network for Good webinar. Farra is a seasoned fundraising and nonprofit marketing professional who has helped hundreds of nonprofits create amazing campaigns and communicate more effectively via social channels. This is a perfect opportunity to learn from one of the best. Registration is free and I hope you can join us. (Note: If you can’t attend the live stream, we’ll send you the presentation so you can review it on demand.)Develop Your Social Media StrategyTuesday, October 22nd, 2013 1 pm EDT 27% of online time is now spent on social networking. Source: Experian Tweet this stat.47% of those 45 and younger in the U.S. say social media is more valuable than search for discovering news. Source: Reuters Tweet this stat.Thanks to recent algorithm changes, Google now uses many social factors as top criteria for ranking search results. Source: Searchmetrics Tweet this fact.Twitter’s fastest growing age demographic is 55 to 64 year olds. Source: Global Web Index Tweet this stat.last_img read more

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Do you have a plan for me?

first_imgAs fundraisers, we often want to know why and how our supporters plan to donate in any given year. As donors, we usually want to know the same thing from the organizations we support. If I give to your organization, what can I expect? Do you have a plan for me if I am a new supporter? A lapsed donor? A major donor? A peer-to-peer giver? A recurring donor? If you don’t have a plan for me, how do you expect to develop a relationship with me as a donor? We often talk about segmenting lists and personalizing communications, but when it comes to your various donor and supporter types, do you have a holistic plan for identifying, nurturing, and retaining each unique tier of support? While you may have the best intentions, without a clearly articulated plan, it’s unlikely you’ll be able to successfully execute tactics that will help you create a well-rounded, long-term fundraising approach for each type of donor (or potential donor).For best results, your comprehensive fundraising strategy should include: a list of key segments for your organizationhow your organization defines each segmentthe historical and projected fundraising results from each groupthe specific tactics and messages that will help you build relationships with each type of donor You should also understand how each segment interacts with the rest of your donor pool and which triggers move someone from one tier to the next (in either direction). If you don’t have this data, start by talking with your most loyal donors to find out what has them giving year after year.Need some help thinking about this? Download the archived presentation of our free webinar with Sea Change Strategies’ fundraising experts Alia McKee and Mark Rovner. Listen to the recording f to learn from these two fundraising gurus, get an inside look at The Missing Middle report, and get your mid-level donor questions answered.last_img read more

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3 Ways to Shrink Your Communications-Fundraising Divide

first_imgThere’s strong evidence that integrating communications and fundraising into a single team is a real success factor. For many organizations, that shift is far, far away or absolutely out of the question. Even so, you can take small steps to shake up your silos and build productive partnerships.Try any or all of these three approaches to bring your communications and fundraising teams closer together—and boost results. Donors first! Map out how and when your organization touches an individual in each of your target audiences or segments.It’s human nature to ignore a problem until it’s in your face. This technique will highlight what’s really going on.Partner up a fundraiser and a communicator to visually document touchpoints within a week or month for individuals representative of your priority audiences. Use your personas if you’ve already developed them. Map the campaign, message, format, channel, call to action, and timing details for each touchpoint.You’ll likely uncover some days when an individual receives multiple touches with conflicting messages—aka chaos!Nothing is a stronger motivator for coordinating messages and missiles.Bonus: Mapping supporter touchpoints showcases everyone who has played a role in spurring a donation or other desired action. Typically, credit is given only to the creator of the last interaction, overlooking many of the contributors who move supporters to act. Identify what’s working—from each “side”—and do more of that.Ask your communications team to identify the fundraising team’s three most effective approaches and to integrate those techniques into their own work—and vice versa.While you’re at it, ask each team to identify what the other is doing that isn’t working. Try this: Ask each team to give the other one a “free pass” to make a single change to their work, without protest or arguments, for a week. If your marketing director can make only one change to a fundraiser’s direct-mail letter, what will it be? And what single change will the development director make to the marketer’s Facebook post?This practice enables each team to focus on what is truly most important to them, gives each team some level of control, and encourages both to better understand each other without arguing over the merits of the requested change.P.S. I learned this method from my favorite transformative change experts, Switch authors Chip and Dan Heath. The Heaths advocate this underused technique as the most reliable pathway to positive change. Co-create messaging for a single campaign.Select a time-limited campaign that’s related to both teams’ goals. Possible focal points include a significant organizational anniversary, an exceptional opportunity to work with a celebrity, a new program launch, or a change in strategy.Next, task a few communications and development staff members to fully collaborate in creating the campaign messages. This is another useful way each team can learn what’s happening behind the scenes on the “other team” and understand their point of view.Ask collaborators to document the process, especially stumbling blocks, so collaboration will go smoother next time. Then, when the messages are complete, sit down with both teams to discuss the process and the product.Ask the folks who worked together on this campaign to share the high points and the pain of the process, as well as the unexpected benefits for the end product (the messages). Brainstorm recommendations for shifts in each team’s creative, review, and approval process. Then, keep your eyes open for the next co-creation opportunity.Tiny wins like these are the most realistic way I know to shift the status quo. I dare you to experiment with one of these techniques. Let me know how it goes!From Network for Good: Nancy is spot on with her recommendations for communication and fundraising teams. If you can’t implement Nancy’s ideas for tracking donor touchpoints, it’s time to invest in a smarter way to manage your donors. A donor management system can help you keep better track of all your donor information, communication, and more. Talk to a Network for Good rep today and we can help you get started.last_img read more

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Piecing Together the Maternal Death Puzzle Through Narratives: The Three Delays Model Revisited

first_imgPosted on January 3, 2013March 21, 2017By: Kate Mitchell, Manager of the MHTF Knowledge Management System, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)PLOS ONE recently published an article, Piecing Together the Maternal Death Puzzle through Narratives: The Three Delays Model Revisited, that explores various socio-cultural and facility-based factors that played a significant role in maternal deaths in the Lilongwe district of Malawi between January 2011 and June 2011.Take a look at the abstract here:BackgroundIn Malawi maternal mortality continues to be a major public health challenge. Going beyond the numbers to form a more complete view of why women die is critical to improving access to and quality of emergency obstetric care. The objective of the current study was to identify the socio-cultural and facility-based factors that contributed to maternal deaths in the district of Lilongwe, Malawi.MethodsRetrospectively, 32 maternal death cases that occurred between January 1, 2011 and June 30, 2011 were reviewed independently by two gynecologists/obstetricians. Interviews were conducted with healthcare staff, family members, neighbors, and traditional birth attendants. Guided by the grounded theory approach, interview transcripts were analyzed manually and continuously. Emerging, recurring themes were identified and excerpts from the transcripts were categorized according to the Three Delays Model (3Ds).ResultsSixteen deaths were due to direct obstetric complications, sepsis and hemorrhage being most common. Sixteen deaths were due to indirect causes with the main cause being anemia, followed by HIV and heart disease. Lack of recognizing signs, symptoms, and severity of the situation; using traditional Birth Attendant services; low female literacy level; delayed access to transport; hardship of long distance and physical terrain; delayed prompt quality emergency obstetric care; and delayed care while at the hospital due to patient refusal or concealment were observed. According to the 3Ds, the most common delay observed was in receiving treatment upon reaching the facility due to referral delays, missed diagnoses, lack of blood, lack of drugs, or inadequate care, and severe mismanagement.Read the full article here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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