Study at the World’s 2nd most International University with a Scholarship

first_img November 10, 2017 Published by rosica Reddit This is a Paid Article Deadline: February 1, 2018Open to: graduate students from any countryScholarship: generous scholarships, ranging from tuition awards to scholarships with stipends and housing, available to accepted students from any countryDescriptionEver wondered what it’s like to study in a truly global community?Ranked the 2nd most international university in the world, Central European University (CEU) brings together students and faculty from 115 countries to exchange ideas in an open and dynamic community in Budapest. Listed among the top 100 universities worldwide by Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) in a variety of subjects, it offers world-class master’s and doctoral programs in English to address key issues of the 21st century. Besides interdisciplinary courses taught by an outstanding faculty, the University boasts a highly research-intensive learning environment and a remarkable student/faculty ratio of 8:1. CEU is accredited in the U.S. and Hungary. Share 0 By Danny William says: Tweet Academic areas:Cognitive ScienceEconomics and BusinessEnvironmental Sciences and PolicyGender StudiesHistoryInternational RelationsLegal StudiesMathematics and its ApplicationsMedieval StudiesNationalism StudiesNetwork SciencePhilosophyPolitical SciencePublic PolicySociology and Social Anthropology +1 Corporate Income Tax (CIT) Intern at Gas Power Finance Budapest The Young Leaders’ Forum – Innovation, Environment, Future EligibilityCEU is committed to attracting talented students and scholars from around the world, and provides generous scholarships available to accepted students from any country.ScholarshipIn 2016-2017, 84% of CEU students received financial aid, ranging from tuition awards to scholarships with stipends and housing. Find out more about CEU’s programs, admission requirements and available funding options at www.ceu.edu.How to apply?Apply before February 1, 2018 to join us for 2018/2019 and study with a scholarship! More at www.ceu.edu. One thought on “Study at the World’s 2nd most International University with a Scholarship” center_img on November 11, 2017 at 7:11 am Sub-Saharan Africa Excellence Scholarships in Netherlands → LinkedIn 0 Pocket Leave a Reply Cancel ReplyYou must be logged in to post a comment. ← Apply for a Google AI Residency Program Log in to Reply Study at the World’s 2nd most International University with a Scholarship Cross-Border Investigative Journalism Training for the Western Balkans Hello Admin,It is very nice that your blog is providing information regarding the program. I want to aware you towards the “Honors and President’s Scholarships at Augsburg”. The program is open to high school seniors and undergraduate students who have a 3.5 or higher GPAApplication Deadline is January 15, 2018For more information, you can go through –https://www.developingcareer.com/honors-and-presidents-scholarships-at-augsburg/ Similar Stories last_img read more

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New Fund for Asia to Protect Poor From Climate Extremes

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreA new $140 million fund to boost climate resilience in cities in six Asian countries was launched on Friday by the Rockefeller Foundation, the UK government, and the Asian Development Bank.The Urban Climate Change Resilience Partnership aims to protect 2.2 million poor and vulnerable people from climate and disaster risks by 2021.The money will be spent on physical infrastructure such as drainage, safer housing, flood protection and wastewater systems, as well as “soft investments”, including improved surveillance and early warning, updated building codes, and water and land-use planning. The fund, which is also expected to leverage at least $1 billion in additional public and private investment, will be available to local governments and non-profits in 25 medium-sized cities in Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, Philippines and Vietnam.(READ the REUTERS story from Trust.org)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Web 2.0 Conference: Ad Models: A New Approach to Marketing?

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#conferences#web#Web 2.0 Conference 2005 Related Posts Real-time blogging going on here… Jeff Jarvis, President & Creative Director, Advance.netDick Costolo, CEO, FeedburnerMatt Cutts, Software Engineer, GoogleChas Edwards, Vice President, Sales & Market Development, Federated Media PublishingBrian McAndrews, President and CEO, aQuantiveMark Pincus, Founder, tribe.netTime: 11:15am – 12:30pmpowerpoint about Distributed advertisingIntro by Jeff, then all the panelists introduced themselves.  “Ads can be a service” (Mark Cutts, Google)A media person: Online space –> metrics coming along nicely; other mediaspaces like what they see –> expectation of same metrics as online for otherforms of media. Metrics is getting much more sophisticated.–> engagement: not eyeballs; how *deep* or how related or how interested wasconsumer/user in an ad; how to measure engagement (for tv 2.0, video 2.0 etc)Brian: experiment; easy to do in small pieces; targeted; brandedadvertisement big online nowChas: tech issues can be solved relatively easy; hard qst is gettingmarketers comfortable; look at blogs that are doing things in media business,online, really well; higher loyalty than on tv etc; find publications that havetremendous audience affinities (turns out they’re blogs)Mark: CPA; b2b marketer can get to highly sophisticated, targeted marketsnow; whether its Google Adsense on an open one, marketers should be able toidentify key blogs etcMatt: experimentation is key; variety (of ads, how they’re presented) makes adifference; allowing experimentation from publishers (e.g. bidding on adwords)Mark: qst to Matt –> when will google open up the ad network (experiment)Matt: it’s definitely a priority; talks about resourcing; “freedom totinker”Jeff: serving up 4 times as much RSS as html; how to get money out of rss?Dick: “we think we’re fixing that”; circulation; rss asdifferentiated from the site –> rss feed users express explicit interest inthe content site. eg a Mac site gets a very effective CPM on site, but in feed avery low CPM –> what will work for that audience is an ad for a Mac expo.Jeff: all about relevanceFred Wilson: reed’s law (prof at MIT) –> each node becomes/forms its ownnetworkDick –> feeds into sell-side advertising a little bit. in a CPA world;other publishers can take that ad and use it. eg original advertiser gets a cut3-4 rungs down the chain.Ross Mayfield: cost per influence; social incentives for advertising arefucked up. “buyers will love this crap.”Jeff: publisher can take over the creative (eg Dell stuff he blogged about)Audience qst: u can’t let users create a brand (skeptical of value)Jeff: brand is the trust.Brian: buy-side data is very powerful info –> publisher doesn’t have thatJeff: why not open source that?Brian: in CPM world, he’s not going to let publishers know what kind of valueit’s being created… takes a crack at Apple market share as opposed to dell.qst: user be more participatory; predictive analysis; how to give users anincentive?Jeff et all: trust, transparency Dick: advertising networks have to provide more value to publishers; egaggregate stats that are valuable for everyoneFred: privacy; real world thinks its creepyMatt (google): opt-in eg to personalized search; different experimentationand networks (not just google); competition important (but he takes a swipe atYahoo ads). If someone comes along and makes a better product than googleadsense, that makes a better world. talks about ning.com and trying newsolutions [experimentation is a big word in this workshop]Brian: re relevance, onus on industry to educate people; next phase is brandphase and that’s going to be more difficult.Dick: re relevancy, it’s hadr to separate out nefarious uses of such atechnology; long time before it’s introduced into rss (whether they want to handover their ‘attention’); eg amazon treasure box –> very scary thing for mostpeople (how’d they know it was me); opting in.Matt: adsense criticals: 1) network effect; 2) relevancy; 3) target theinterest, not the user. value in serendipity. control to user (eg amazon opt outof interests)qst: how to serve up ads that user doesn’t know they’re interested in?Matt: networks; ton of room left for experimenting; lot of niches waiting tobe exploredBrian: work to find better ways to measure brand.qst: rich media adsDick: ads as content. eg podcast from digital photography company. eg bmwfilm stuff was first gen of that.Lots of talk about video, tv, product placements.qst: sponsorships around content vs advertisingMatt: eg lifehacker has a lot of commonality; disclosure really important(money is involved here, etc). lifehacker a good eg.That’s about it for this post. Will do other workshops and stuff over thenext few days. Also have written notes to type and publish when I get time. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… richard macmanus 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Holder Petra Kvitova knocked out of Wimbledon

first_imgA woman who once fumed she “needed a helicopter” to go on a Wimbledon court she called a “parking lot” could not have been happier with her surroundings on Saturday as Jelena Jankovic sent holder Petra Kvitova spinning out.A tournament still reeling from the second-round exit of Rafa Nadal 48 hours earlier, and the near-exit of Serena Williams 24 hours ago, suffered its biggest shock of this year’s championships as Jankovic emerged from the tennis wilderness to deliver the most unexpected of knockout punches.The Serbian, who had fallen in the opening round at three of the four previous grand slams, announced her return to the big stage with a heart-stopping 3-6 7-5 6-4 third-round victory over the second-seeded Czech that left Centre Court buzzing.”Oh my God! I am overwhelmed and so excited. My heart is still pumping,” said the 28th seed whose reign as world number one in 2008 feels like a lifetime ago.”I have played so poorly the last couple of years and playing on Centre Court against the defending champion was unbelievable. The crowd was really great.”Playing on grass is so difficult for me, it does not come naturally. I’m glad I was able to win against a two-time Wimbledon champion. It was amazing.”While Jankovic was rolling on to her back in delight, and showed her appreciation to the crowd by shaping a heart with her fingers, the men’s favourites made serene progress.HAIR-RAISING MOMENTA 147 mph howitzer that whistled past Roger Federer’s ears provided one of the few hair-raising moments in the men’s draw when grand slam champions old and new safely planted themselves into the second week of the championships.advertisementSam Groth bombarded Federer’s half of the court with 21 aces, and one missile clocked a fraction short of Taylor Dent’s 2010 Wimbledon record of 148 mph, but it takes more than a “freaky serve” to flatten a seven-times Wimbledon champion.In fact the Australian did not even come close to earning a break point as Federer eased into week two for the 12th time in 13 years with a 6-4, 6-4, 6-7(5), 6-2 third-round victory.”I’ve played three matches now, no breaks faced, it’s great,” summed up the 17-times grand slam champion.Andy Murray also dropped his first set at this year’s event and needed on-court treatment for a sore shoulder before advancing to a fourth round showdown with big-serving Ivo Karlovic with a 6-2, 6-2, 1-6, 6-1 win.Joining them in the fourth round was the newest member of the grand slam club, US Open champion Marin Cilic. But, unlike Federer, the Croatian ninth seed had to face loads of breaks as he survived his second successive five-set thriller at Wimbledon.A match between two missile-serving giants had the potential to go on and on, but luckily for Cilic he only needed 15 minutes and two games on Saturday to complete a 7-6(4), 6-7(6), 6-4, 6-7(4), 12-10 win over John Isner that was suspended at 10-10 on Friday.A contest that had featured 437 points, 159 winners and 72 aces, ended tamely with an Isner double fault after four hours 31 minutes.”It sucks,” summed up the American loser.DANCING DREADLOCKSDustin Brown and his waist-length dancing dreadlocks also took their final bow at Wimbledon as Nadal’s conqueror was beaten 6-4, 7-6(3), 4-6,6-3 by Serbia’s Viktor Troicki.Karlovic hurled down 41 aces in a 7-6(3), 4-6, 7-6(2), 7-6(9) win over French 13th seed Jo-Wilfried Tsonga.However, it was Kvitova’s sensational demise that appeared to flummox everyone, including the 2014 champion.”I’m not really sure what happened out there,” said the left-hander.No one saw the defeat coming after Kvitova had whipped her first two opponents for the loss of just three games in total.But Jankovic produced the kind of shots not seen from her racket since she ruled tennis all those years ago and stormed back from a set and 4-2 down to pull off the most improbable of victories when Kvitova whacked a backhand into the net.It was little wonder that a woman who was left angry seven years ago when as the second seed she was forced to play on Court 18 could not stop grinning on Saturday.”I cannot stop smiling. It’s a really big win for me, especially playing on Centre Court,” she said.”I just beat a defending champion. It’s unbelievable.”last_img read more

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How to be resilient in hardship

first_imgMy friend and colleague Amanda alerted me to this article on the five traits of resilient people. Since that quality is needed by so many of us now, I thought I’d pass on the insights from Jessie Sholl. What occurred to me as I was reading this list is that you probably have every one of these qualities. Working for a good cause is a daily exercise in resilience. Please share that quality with those who need it now.1. Be Positive. “Resilient people are characterized by an ability to experience both negative and positive emotions even in difficult or painful situation. They mourn losses and endure frustrations, but they also find redeeming potential or value in most challenges.” If you work for a good cause, you have this quality. You find hope amid terrible tragedies in the course of advancing a mission.2. Live to Learn. When resilient people encounter pain, they look for solutions. That would be you.3. Open Your Heart. Counting your blessings and committing acts of kindness and service boost resilience. That’s your day job!4. Take Care of Yourself. Good physical and mental health boosts resilience. 5. Hang on to Humor. This is so true. A laugh goes a long way. Do you bring levity to the job?For more on these qualities as well as the amazing tale of Turkey Lady, read the whole article.last_img read more

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Obama email team reveals what worked – and didn’t – in election fundraising

first_imgM+R had a fascinating post* last week about political fundraising. It highlighted insights from the digital team who sent out fundraising emails for the Obama campaign. While political fundraising is its own animal, I do think many of these insights apply to all forms of fundraising. So whether you’re a political activist or a nonprofit fundraiser, or of the red or blue or purple persuasion, you will find this interesting.(The whole post is here. These are some highlights along with my commentary.)1. It’s hard to predict what will work – so testing matters. There were 18 very smart people on the email team alone, and they often predicted the wrong winners among versions of emails. And just when they figured out what worked, it stopped working. So they tested again. Keep testing!2. The best segmentation was based on what donors did – not how they voted or their demographics. Segmenting their message according to the ways people responded worked far better in yielding strong fundraising results than any other variable. What have people donated in the past? In response to which appeals? Segment accordingly.3. Length didn’t seem to matter a lot, until the end of the campaign, when shorter did better (reminds me of my advice to write very short appeals on December 31!). What did matter was the content and relevance of the message.4. For fundraising, setting a big goal for number of donations worked, but little, very local goals (we need six more donors in Washington, DC) did not. Those only worked for advocacy. Interesting. Something to test?And my favorite finding? The best appeals also had the highest unsubscribe rates. Like Mark Rovner always says, evoking passion means you get strong opinions on all sides. Bland is safe – and gets NO reaction.For more findings, check out the full post, “Surprises from Obama’s New Media Staff.”*Hat tip to Jono Smith of Event360 for sharing the post.last_img read more

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Use Your Newsletters to Keep Donors Loyal, Focused, and Giving

first_imgFollow these steps to strengthen your relationship with donors and increase retention rates. In my next post on this topic, I’ll share some key strategies for creating email newsletters that won’t immediately see the delete button.With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build the strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org. You’ve seen it happen: When we stop putting energy into relationships with family and friends—relying on past interactions to hold us together—those relationships tend to fall apart. Like your college roommate or that work friend from your first job.Relationships with organization’s donors require the same kind of focus and energy for the duration—if you want to keep them happy, involved, and giving.Unfortunately, recent research suggests that most fundraisers are doing a poor job of maintaining connections, with donor retention rates at an all-time low of 39%. That means your organization could be cut from the give-to list at any point.But there is a proven approach to stopping this fatal attrition—placing hyperfocus on relationships with existing donors to keep them close. That’s mammoth potential, and your donor newsletter is a vital tool for bringing it to life.Here’s how to put your newsletter into play:1. Share, don’t ask.The primary goal of both print and e-newsletters is to reshape your donor relationships from transactional to one that’s more personal, productive, and long term—the big three of donor retention.The only way to get there is to get beyond the ask. After your prompt thanks to a donor for her first gift, you want to invite her further into your organization. Make her feel acknowledged, appreciated, and right at home, just as you would the first time you invite a new friend into your home.In much the same way, your newsletter invites donors in to experience your organization’s (and community’s) personality, promises, and values in a rich, close way.2. Connect your content and your people.Think of your newsletters as opportunities to visit with a donor. Your print newsletter (vital if your donor base skews heavily toward older supporters) is like a rich, immersive visit where you have the opportunity to get into deep conversation. (In many cases, an occasional print newsletter can actually help your organization stand out.) On the other hand, your e-news is more like a quick drop-in.Stories form the core of your newsletter. Prioritize the elements donors focus on most: photos, headlines, photo captions, and articles. Here’s where you show what your donors’ gifts have accomplished and tell how much you appreciate them.Send this version of yournewsletter in both formats only to active and recent donors so your voice stays clear and focused.3. Keep it all about donors—with an imaginary editorial board.It’s tough to remember that your organization is just one small part of your donors’ lives, especially when you live your job. But consider your personal donations—how often do you think about the organizations you support?Keep your donors front and center with an imaginary editorial board composed of personas (aka profiles: how-tos here) representing up to nine of your most important donor segments.Then, get to know your editorial board members by surrounding your desk with these profiles, and keep them in front of you while you write. It sounds hokey, but it works!4. Make it easy to recognize and remember.Using a different mix of written and graphic content, and sometimes even different layouts, for every issue is the most common error in print newsletter production. Ugh!Although this “use whatever we’ve got” or “let’s keep it from getting boring” approach might make it easier for you to get the newsletter out the door, you’re making it tough for donors to recognize it at a glance (that’s all the time you get) and absorb it.Instead, create a content formula or mix based on your donor personas’ wants and interests. Consistently following this formula makes it easier for you to find and craft the content you need and for readers to recognize your newsletter at a glance—increasing the odds that they’ll read it.last_img read more

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How To Get Donations? 14 Reasons Why People Donate

first_imgThe Secret to Getting People to Give: Giving isn’t a business transaction. It’s a human connection. To inspire donors to give, you need to make a meaningful connection by showing them why they matter and how they can make a difference. When you understand why your donors give, you’ll be able to make a more effective appeal.Don’t be afraid to reach out to your donors personally and find out why they give. Their stories matter, and sharing them create inspiration for others to follow their example. (If you don’t have an easy way to keep track of your relationships with your donors, check out Network for Good’s easy donor management system.)That being said, here are some of the top reasons why donors give:Someone I know asked me to give, and I wanted to help themFelt emotionally moved by someone’s storyWant to feel I’m not powerless in the face of need and can help (this is especially true during disasters)Want to feel I’m changing someone’s lifeFeel a sense of closeness to a community or groupWant to memorialize someone (who is struggling or died of a disease, for example)Was raised to give to charity—it’s tradition in my familyWant to be “hip,” and supporting this charity (i.e., wearing a yellow wristband) is in styleIt makes me feel connected to other people and builds my social networkWant to have a good image of myself/my companyWant to leave a legacy that perpetuates me, my ideas or my causeFeel fortunate and want to give something back to othersGive for religious reasons—my faith teaches me to help othersWant to be seen as a leader/role modelGet the right tool to help you raise more money for your cause. Learn more about Network for Good’s fundraising products.Remember: The act of giving is immediate:Give your donors the opportunity to act here and now. Your relationship with them will be long-term, but their willingness to give is now—let them act on it.There are many reasons why people give. When you’re crafting your next fundraising appeal, take this list out and ask yourself if you’ve tapped into these reasons. People act from the heart, not the head:Yes, your nonprofit has to show that it’s a good steward of donor money and you need to impart where all that generosity is going, but your appeal must contain more than numbers and pie charts.center_img Giving is a personal act:Your appeals need to be donor-centric. Make sure to tell your donor why they should care, and why they matter to your organization. Learn more about crafting your call-to-action and writing personal emails.last_img read more

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Year-End Fundraising Through the Lens of Donor Engagement

first_imgFall is a busy time of year. Whether it’s getting the kids back to school or the quick transitions between Halloween, Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, and Christmas, there are many reminders that the dog days of summer are long behind us. On top of all that, we are looking squarely in the face of the year-end fundraising push. Whether or not your fiscal year ends on December 31, donors and nonprofits alike know this is the prime giving season. Consider these stats from Network for Good’s Digital Giving Index:30% of all giving occurs in December.12% of all giving happens in the last three days of the year.Many terrific blog posts and webinars offer words of advice about how to end the year on a strong note. If we know we’ll have donors’ growing attention over the next two and a half months, I suggest looking at the end-of-year blitz as one part of a longer donor engagement plan. Sustainable fundraising embodies a year-round dialogue with your donors and isn’t limited to these last two to three months of the year. This is especially important to keep in mind since we know organizations have been facing a negative growth in donors: For every 100 new and recovered donors, 103 were lost through attrition. Your focus over these next few months should be on engaging the donors you have so they continue to give.Share, Celebrate, and Don’t OversolicitPenelope Burk, the guru of donor-centered fundraising, found in her research that the number one reason donors stop supporting an organization is that they feel they are being “oversolicited.” With tight deadlines and multichannel communications, it’s easy to get swept up in the transactional part of fundraising—getting those gifts in by December 31. Are your communications—e-newsletters, mailed and electronic solicitations, tweets, Facebook posts, and so on—bringing donors closer to your work and inspiring them to commit more deeply to your mission without always asking for money?Before you begin asking for year-end gifts, use a variety of multi-channel fundraising to bring your work and beneficiaries before your donors:Share with your donors’ examples of impact and stories of transformation that their gift made possible.Highlight what you were able to do because of the gifts you received from your donors.Celebrate your donors and make them feel that their support made a difference in some way.Now your solicitations will be natural extensions of the dialogue you’ve created around the results donors have helped you achieve, resulting in donors being more open to investing in you again.Engage Your Middle to Major Gift Donors and ProspectsMiddle to major donors generally have higher loyalty rates and consider their gifts to you as investments. Show these donors how much you valued them:Schedule staff or volunteer leadership calls to these larger donors just to thank them for their continued support and to share a few highlights of your year.Send this group of donors and prospects a personal letter, a link to a video or simple thank you card from one of your beneficiaries.Give these donors and prospects an up-close and in-person view of your work. Can they meet any of your staff and/or beneficiaries or participate in a one-off volunteer opportunity?Mind you, these are all stewardship activities that should not be isolated to year-end. But in the spirit of the seasons of thanking and giving, they can complement the inundation of solicitations these donors will be receiving from you and other organizations.Assess and Grow in 2016We all know that feeling of relief when December 31 has come and gone. How will you build off that year-end fundraising momentum in 2016? In addition to making sure all gifts are promptly processed and acknowledged (another key ingredient in Penelope Burk’s donor-centered fundraising), this is a good time to assess and adjust your plans for 2016 in two ways.First, determine which messages or communication format resonated most with your audience. Make necessary adjustments in your 2016 plans to ensure you’re speaking to your donors in the way that resonates best.Second, take stock of who gave to your organization:Did you have new donors (either first-time or lapsed donors who returned) and donors who upgraded their support? Call or visit your new and upgraded donors to thank them and find out what motivated their new or increased gifts.You might also conduct wealth-capacity screening to identify which of these donors has the potential for a larger commitment, and then tailor a personalized cultivation strategy to bring them closer to your organization.Did any of your LYBUNTs not make a gift? Focus on finding out why your larger and longstanding LYBUNTs didn’t include you in their philanthropic plans. Understanding what drove their decision is important for you to find out and could lead to renewed support down the road. It shows your donors that you care about their motivations and don’t just view them as a walking ATM.The “noise” of appeals and communications from organizations competing for limited philanthropic dollars will grow louder over the next couple of months. Use the themes of gratitude and generosity (of spirit, interest, and information) to drive thoughtful connection with your donors.Make this December your best year-end fundraising season ever with Network for Good’s smarter fundraising software, built just for nonprofits. Reach more donors, raise more money, and retain more supporters this year with easy-to-use tools and step-by-step coaching. We have everything you need for a bigger, better campaign, all under one roof. Find out more by speaking with one of our expert fundraising consultants.last_img read more

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Human Rights Day: Addressing Gender-Based Violence in Maternal Care

first_imgPosted on December 10, 2014June 12, 2017By: Nevia Pavletic, Implementation Science Intern, TRAction ProjectClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is in commemoration of Human Rights Day and the importance of the last 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence, which started off with the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women. Disrespect and abuse in maternity care is an institutionalized form of gender violence. In addition, please find a round-up of recent news addressing human rights violations and gender violence at the end of this post.The fact that nearly one in three women globally has experienced intimate partner violence, a form of gender-based violence (GBV), is widely known. But can you easily name a situation where GBV occurs in the healthcare system?GBV is a worldwide problem that occurs in many contexts and in many forms including sexual violence, physical and verbal abuse, and cultural practices that harm women. The 16 Days of Activism against Gender Based Violence campaign, which launched on November 25th, puts this serious issue under the international spotlight.Current discourses on GBV, though they acknowledge that GBV occurs in many different contexts, rarely address GBV in health care settings. Disrespect and abuse during childbirth not only echoes other forms of GBV, but also contributes to women’s underutilization of skilled delivery services, which can negatively impact women’s health. Promoting respectful and dignified maternal health care is central to upholding human rights and improving the provision of women’s healthcare. Incorporating discussions on respectful maternal care into the global GBV dialogue is necessary for making this important issue a global priority.Around the world, women experience a range of disrespectful and abusive behavior at the hands of the health system: including, physical abuse, disregard for privacy, and unfair requests for payment. Research from TRAction-funded projects on respectful maternal care reveals that this disrespect and abuse—as with other forms of GBV—is an extension of existing structural inequalities. For example, these disrespectful, abusive behaviors are often a byproduct of stressful working conditions, as (often female) healthcare workers are overworked in a health system that is frequently understaffed and strained for resources. The TRAction-funded STAHA project in Tanzania has implemented interventions to help healthcare workers cope with stress, and the Heshima Project in Kenya has adopted a model of disrespect and abuse that takes into account the individual, structural, and policy levels, suggesting that effective interventions to decrease disrespect and abuse must be systemic.Recently, TRAction’s implementing partners at Columbia University published a commentary in Lancet’s Midwifery Series, in which they emphasize that disrespect and abuse does not occur only at the hands of healthcare providers, but also by the health system itself. In other words, the existence of disrespect and abuse is a symptom of a “health system in crisis.” While it is imperative that we consider women’s perspectives and experiences, tackling GBV in all its forms will require us to go beyond individual-level interventions to address the structural contexts and power inequalities that enable GBV and disrespect and abuse during childbirth to occur in the first place.Gender equality is clearly key to international efforts to achieve sustainable development goals and situating respectful maternity care within the broader global dialogue on GBV will help us in these efforts.This post originally appeared on the USAID TRAction Blog.News Round-up for Human Rights DayKenyan women with HIV sue over sterilisationWhy Sterilization Is The Most Popular Form Of Family PlanningIndian sterilisation patient: ‘I was slapped and told to calm down’Indian women die after state-run mass sterilisation campaign goes wrongWoman dies at second India sterilisation campShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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