SportShorts: Murray is still a fighter, England grind

first_imgCRICKETAustralia skittle Pakistan to seize control at the GabbaAustralia seized the advantage on the opening day of the first Test when they bowled Pakistan out for 240 just before stumps at the Gabba in Brisbane on Thursday.After the visitors resisted stubbornly in the first session, reaching 57 for no wicket at lunch, pace trio Mitchell Starc (4-52), Josh Hazlewood (2-46) and Pat Cummins (3-60) tore through the Pakistan batting order to put the hosts in charge at the close of play.Australia seized the initiative after lunch when they took five wickets for just 19 runs, reducing Pakistan from 75 for none to 94 for five.The pacemen then struck again late in the day, with 16-year-old debutant Naseem Shah just squeezing out Starc’s hat-trick ball.“It was quite a welcome to Test cricket wasn’t it?” Hazlewood said.Hazlewood said the fast bowlers had enjoyed the extra bounce at the Gabba.“The way we fought back in the second session was perfect,” he said.Pakistan were rescued from complete disaster by Asad Shafiq who played a lone hand, scoring 76 well-made runs.England stand firm against Black Caps on attritional dayEngland’s Ben Stokes hits a shot on day one of the first Test cricket match between England and New Zealand at Bay Oval in Mount Maunganui on November 21, 2019. (Photo by DAVID GRAY / AFP)Half-centuries from Joe Denly and Ben Stokes breathed life into England who reached 241 for four at stumps after a slow start on the first day of the opening Test against New Zealand at Mount Maunganui on Thursday.With England intent on occupying the crease as long as possible — although captain Joe Root’s stay was very brief — and New Zealand bowling tight lines, run-scoring was not a priority but the day was not without its drama.Denly, who claimed the honours in a fascinating battle with New Zealand’s short-ball maestro Neil Wagner, fell for 74 when the second new ball was taken.New Zealand-born Stokes, who punished Trent Boult with four boundaries off consecutive balls, including one from a dropped catch by Ross Taylor at first slip, was unbeaten on 67 with Ollie Pope on 18.Colin de Grandhomme, with gentle medium pacers drifting away from the batsmen, finished with two for 28 while Tim Southee and Wagner had a wicket each. – AFP.=============TENNISAndy Murray’s love of a comeback continues in Davis CupThe Davis Cup has a new format but Andy Murray’s love of a comeback remains intact after the Scot battled from behind to beat Tallon Griekspoor on Wednesday as Great Britain edged past Holland.Murray came from a set down and then trailed 4-1 in the decider in Madrid before beating the spirited Griekspoor, ranked 179 in the world, 6-7 (7/9), 6-4, 7-6 (7/5).“I’ve found a way to win matches many times in my career when I’ve not been playing well,” Murray said. “You can draw on that a little bit.”A scrappy victory gave Great Britain the lead in their opening Group E tie and while Dan Evans lost the second singles rubber to Robin Haase, Jamie Murray and Neal Skupski finished the job in the doubles.Rafael Nadal won his 26th consecutive Davis Cup singles match later on Wednesday as Spain booked their place in the quarter-finals with a 3-0 victory over defending champions Croatia.Novak Djokovic, meanwhile, cruised past Yoshihito Nishioka to help Serbia beat Japan by the same scoreline. – AFP.For more sport your way, download The Citizen’s app for iOS and Android.last_img read more

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Disneyland News — Week of September 21, 2019

first_imgShare This!Halloween continues at Disneyland! Read on to find out about this and more in this week’s Disneyland news.Special Events and Notes© DisneyIt’s Halloween at the Disneyland Resort, and the Halloween festivities are in gear! Disney’s newest Halloween event, the Oogie Boogie Bash will be taking place Sunday, Tuesday, and Thursday at California Adventure. The party includes a dance party, treat trails, and special presentation of World of Color called “Villainous.” Check out our planning guide before you go, and more details and tickets are available here. Halloween also ushers in several seasonal experiences, including:Haunted Mansion Holiday, where the Haunted Mansion receives a Nightmare Before Christmas-themed overlay;Guardians of the Galaxy’s makeover every evening with its Monsters After Dark overlay;Special fireworks on select nights;Cars Land getting into the spirit with amazing Halloween decorations and themed attractions;Special character costumes;And of course, ample opportunities to purchase Halloween-themed treats and merchandise, including a new refillable cauldron popcorn bucket for Passholders.You can find more details about Disneyland’s Halloween offerings here, and make sure you check out our preview before you go!Similarly, Disney is celebrating Dia de los Muertos from now through November 3. Swing by the Plaza de la Familia at Paradise Gardens Park for special music, food, and photo opportunities with Miguel from Coco. As always, there is a display over near Big Thunder Mountain at Disneyland Park as well.Disney recently announced some new entertainment in Frontierland. Starting this week, there will be a strolling magician performing sleight of hand aboard the Mark Twain, in the Golden Horseshoe, or roaming the streets of Frontierland. Later this fall, the Golden Horseshoe will be hosting some dueling piano fun. You can find more details about both offerings here.In non-Halloween-related news, Passholders still have the opportunity to get special commemorative buttons just by mobile ordering food on the Disneyland app.  Each participating location will have its own button, so you collectors will have the chance to rack up quite a few. More details, including a list of participating restaurants, are available here.Looking ahead, the Main Street Electrical Parade is nearly at the end of its renewed run in the evenings, which comes to a close on September 30. Also, the resort prepares for a new parade next Spring, the Magic Happens parade.CrowdsThis is a fairly low time of year from a crowd standpoint, and this week is consistent with that. Really, Sunday is the only day where the crowds are even average; most days range between level 1 and level 3.For the most up-to-date numbers, check out our Crowd Calendar.WeatherTemperatures will be mid to upper 80s most of the week, with it trending cooler towards the end of the week. There’s also a small chance of rain on Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday.As always, it’s wise to double check the weather as the day of your visit approaches. Check out the most up-to-date forecast here.ShowsHalloween Screams — A Villanous Surprise in the Skies is the season’s fireworks show, and it will be shown every night this week.  Fantasmic! will only be shown on the weekend evenings. Note that California Adventure shows Villainous rather than World of Color on party nights. Detailed show schedules, including smaller diversions like The Dapper Dans, can be found here. SL Admission and HoursFor those of you buying tickets as day guests, single-day tickets are Regular pricing ($129/$122) all week long.  Note that California Adventure will close early on Tuesday and Thursday for the Oogie Boogie Bash; regular park hours are as follows this week: PriceREGREGREGREGREGREGREG ShowSatSunMonTueWedThuFri California Adventure8-108-68-88-68-88-68-10 Disneyland8-128-128-118-118-118-118-11 Villainous0202020 Halloween Screams Fireworks1111111 Main Street Electrical Parade2222222 For early admission, the parks will open one hour early for eligible guests at Disneyland Park Saturday, Tuesday, and Thursday, and at Disney California Adventure Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Resort guests can take advantage of these hours every day of their stay for Extra Magic Hours, while guests eligible for Magic Mornings can use that benefit one day at Disneyland Park only. Full park hours can be found by clicking on each date in the Crowd Calendar.Finally, even more Passholder blockouts get lifted this week. Flex reservations are available all days as this goes to press. Frightfully Fun Parade0101010 World of Color1110101 Early EntryDLDCADCADLDCADLDCA Key: SL: Southern California Select Annual Passport; SC: Southern California Annual Passport; DX: Deluxe Annual Passport; SG: Signature Annual PassportRefurbishmentsAs crowds die down for the fall, Disney takes advantage of the opportunity to refurbish some attractions.  This week, Winnie the Pooh and the Mark Twain Riverboat are down through the 27th at Disneyland Park. Over at California Adventure, the Red Car Trolley remains dark until next spring. As always, however, refurbishments can pop up unexpectedly, so check out our refurbishments page to make sure your favorite ride is still running, and for details on exactly what will be down and for how long.That should do it for this week’s news. Check back next week and every week to find out what’s coming down the pike. Got questions? Aware of anything else that prospective guests should know about? Let us know in the comments. SatSunMonTuesWedThurFri SatSunMonTuesWedThurFri Fantasmic!2200002 California AdventureSL SCSL DisneylandSL SCSL SLlast_img read more

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Blogging with Jupiter Research

first_imgrichard macmanus Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#web I’m excited to be involved in the Jupiter Research bloggingproject, as described by Michael Gartenberg:“It wasn’t easy but we’ve just sent the the first three bloggerstheir invites to join us. Will Wagner and Thomas Hawk will betaking a look at our stance on standalone and PC Based DVRs andRichard MacManus will be looking at our latest report on RSSReaders. We’ll be linking directly to what they write and ofcourse, engage in a few comments of our own as well.”I only found out today, so I’ll be reading the Jupiter Researchreport on RSS Readers over the next couple of days. Expect a postfrom me about it by end of this week.center_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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It’s time to get your social strategy in order

first_imgIf you’re still not sure what your organization should be doing with social media, it would be a good idea to figure it out soon. As social media use continues to grow, this channel is becoming even more important to online donors as a way to connect with causes and find news and information.Here are some social media fun facts: Free WebinarWant some help with your nonprofit’s social media strategy? Nonprofit communication expert Farra Trompeter of Big Duck will join us on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 at 1pm EDT for a free Network for Good webinar. Farra is a seasoned fundraising and nonprofit marketing professional who has helped hundreds of nonprofits create amazing campaigns and communicate more effectively via social channels. This is a perfect opportunity to learn from one of the best. Registration is free and I hope you can join us. (Note: If you can’t attend the live stream, we’ll send you the presentation so you can review it on demand.)Develop Your Social Media StrategyTuesday, October 22nd, 2013 1 pm EDT 27% of online time is now spent on social networking. Source: Experian Tweet this stat.47% of those 45 and younger in the U.S. say social media is more valuable than search for discovering news. Source: Reuters Tweet this stat.Thanks to recent algorithm changes, Google now uses many social factors as top criteria for ranking search results. Source: Searchmetrics Tweet this fact.Twitter’s fastest growing age demographic is 55 to 64 year olds. Source: Global Web Index Tweet this stat.last_img read more

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5 Online Fundraising Tools that Should Be Part of Your Donation Management Software

first_img5 Online Fundraising Tools that Should Be Part of Your Donation Management SoftwareBy the time a potential donor gets to your donation page, your organization has invested a significant amount of outreach effort in them. Make sure your online fundraising tools are user-friendly so your donation page doesn’t drive them away. If a page looks unprofessional or is difficult to navigate, users are not going to try to sort it out. They are going to leave the page—without making the donation they had intended to.A great call to action will be ignored if the user becomes frustrated with the page. You want the online donation experience to build trust and make donors comfortable. In order to make your donation management software as engaging and successful at increasing donations as possible, make sure you integrate these five online fundraising tools:Branding: Your constituents recognize your brand, so your donation page should include the same logo, font, colors and themes as the rest of your marketing material. When a donor clicks on a “donate now” button, they should arrive at a page that looks like the rest of your site, so that they are comfortable that they are in the right place for giving money to your organization.Mobile: 31% of all website traffic is users on mobile devices. A donation page should be “responsive,” meaning it is designed to display properly on mobile phones and tablets as well as computer monitors. (Don’t worry about the technical aspects, effective fundraising software has this feature built in—you just have to make sure you choose one that is optimized for mobile.)Call to Action: Your website and email communications should always include a “call to action.” You have to tell people what you want them to do. Your donation page should also include a call to action that relates specifically to making a donation to support your cause.Tracking: One benefit of reaching out to donors online is that you are easily able to track the effectiveness of your outreach. This is how we know how much traffic comes from mobile devices, or what percentage of emails get opened. This is an invaluable resource for nonprofits. Pay attention to what parts of your website get looked at, and which emails get opened. By comparing the results of various campaigns, and different approaches (email, website, etc.) you can see what call to action gets the most response—and the highest donation rate.Testing: Online marketers have found that in some ways, the virtual world reflects the physical world, and people respond the same way online as they do in person. But more often, people behave differently online, and there is no way to predict what way that will be. For example, subtle differences in headlines have been found to make big differences in the rates at which emails are opened. Your donor management software should allow you to compare results from changes that you make so that you know immediately if something has gone wrong—or right!Since 2001, Network for Good has helped over 100,000 nonprofit organizations raise more than $1 billion online. To discuss how we can help you get the most out of your fundraising efforts, contact us today or call 1-888-284-7978 x1.last_img read more

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Summertime Shifts: Keep Connecting Through Fireflies, Fireworks, and Family Vacations

first_imgSummer is just different. Even though schooldays ended eons ago for most of us, our focus, attitudes, and readiness to act change as the weather warms.Over the years, I’ve heard from many of you that you feel the same, as do your supporters and prospects. And you’ve asked me how to connect in the context of sizzling summer distractions. This Book Could Change Your Life: Great Summer Reads for Fundraisers Here are three ways to up your summer communications game: Craft your asks to be short, sweet, and personal, like this creative appeal from Food for the Poor, suggests fundraiser Pamela Grow. Nothing is more important than crafting content that’s relevant to your readers. But it’s challenging when they’re distracted by the delights of ice cream, the beach, and after-dinner badminton. What summertime shifts do you make in your fundraising campaigns and communications? Please share in the comments section! Whatever summertime shifts you consider, it’s ideal to base them on what you know about your people, anecdotally and/or via data on last summer’s responses. If possible, measure before and after each shift, and make only one change at a time so you know what does or doesn’t work. Send less frequently. No Friday sends. More Summer Stuffcenter_img Make your content more fun, light, active, and short attention span friendly, advises Kivi Leroux Miller from Nonprofit Marketing Guide. Be aware that you’re communicating to people who are on or just back from vacation, says John Haydon. That could mean sending an email twice (with a fresh subject line the second time), with round two going to those who didn’t open the first, and extending a campaign period into early fall. If you know your people are on email less and Facebook more, follow them where they are. This applies whatever the season. Here’s more summertime shift guidance from some of the best fundraisers and communicators I know: Reboot with These 6 Summer Camp Strategies Shift your topic, tone, and/or language to make it seasonally relevant and fun. Change timing and/or frequency. A quick poll of nonprofit communicators found this to be the most common summertime shift. With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org.last_img read more

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3 Ways to Shrink Your Communications-Fundraising Divide

first_imgThere’s strong evidence that integrating communications and fundraising into a single team is a real success factor. For many organizations, that shift is far, far away or absolutely out of the question. Even so, you can take small steps to shake up your silos and build productive partnerships.Try any or all of these three approaches to bring your communications and fundraising teams closer together—and boost results. Donors first! Map out how and when your organization touches an individual in each of your target audiences or segments.It’s human nature to ignore a problem until it’s in your face. This technique will highlight what’s really going on.Partner up a fundraiser and a communicator to visually document touchpoints within a week or month for individuals representative of your priority audiences. Use your personas if you’ve already developed them. Map the campaign, message, format, channel, call to action, and timing details for each touchpoint.You’ll likely uncover some days when an individual receives multiple touches with conflicting messages—aka chaos!Nothing is a stronger motivator for coordinating messages and missiles.Bonus: Mapping supporter touchpoints showcases everyone who has played a role in spurring a donation or other desired action. Typically, credit is given only to the creator of the last interaction, overlooking many of the contributors who move supporters to act. Identify what’s working—from each “side”—and do more of that.Ask your communications team to identify the fundraising team’s three most effective approaches and to integrate those techniques into their own work—and vice versa.While you’re at it, ask each team to identify what the other is doing that isn’t working. Try this: Ask each team to give the other one a “free pass” to make a single change to their work, without protest or arguments, for a week. If your marketing director can make only one change to a fundraiser’s direct-mail letter, what will it be? And what single change will the development director make to the marketer’s Facebook post?This practice enables each team to focus on what is truly most important to them, gives each team some level of control, and encourages both to better understand each other without arguing over the merits of the requested change.P.S. I learned this method from my favorite transformative change experts, Switch authors Chip and Dan Heath. The Heaths advocate this underused technique as the most reliable pathway to positive change. Co-create messaging for a single campaign.Select a time-limited campaign that’s related to both teams’ goals. Possible focal points include a significant organizational anniversary, an exceptional opportunity to work with a celebrity, a new program launch, or a change in strategy.Next, task a few communications and development staff members to fully collaborate in creating the campaign messages. This is another useful way each team can learn what’s happening behind the scenes on the “other team” and understand their point of view.Ask collaborators to document the process, especially stumbling blocks, so collaboration will go smoother next time. Then, when the messages are complete, sit down with both teams to discuss the process and the product.Ask the folks who worked together on this campaign to share the high points and the pain of the process, as well as the unexpected benefits for the end product (the messages). Brainstorm recommendations for shifts in each team’s creative, review, and approval process. Then, keep your eyes open for the next co-creation opportunity.Tiny wins like these are the most realistic way I know to shift the status quo. I dare you to experiment with one of these techniques. Let me know how it goes!From Network for Good: Nancy is spot on with her recommendations for communication and fundraising teams. If you can’t implement Nancy’s ideas for tracking donor touchpoints, it’s time to invest in a smarter way to manage your donors. A donor management system can help you keep better track of all your donor information, communication, and more. Talk to a Network for Good rep today and we can help you get started.last_img read more

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New Resource Page: Respectful Maternity Care

first_imgPosted on April 11, 2013March 13, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Along with the respectful maternity care guest blog series, the MHTF has launched a new resource page on respectful care. The page provides an overview of the major concerns for efforts to humanize care during pregnancy and childbirth, as well as links to organizations working on issues related to ensuring that women are treated with dignity during pregnancy and labor; recent articles on issues related to respectful care; and posts from the MHTF blog.We hope you will have a look at the resources that are currently posted, and return often, since the page will be updated as new resources become available. Finally, we invite you to submit your suggestions for additional resources that may be included.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Why Are Women Dying When They Reach the Hospital on Time?

first_imgPosted on July 10, 2013March 6, 2017By: Dr. Alice Self, Sandwell General Hospital, Lyndon, West Bromwich; Hannah Knight, Research Fellow, Health Informatics, Office for Research and Clinical Audit, Lindsay Stewart R&D Centre, Royal College of Obstetricians and GynaecologistsClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)It can be hard to imagine the challenges some women and their families face whilst trying to access timely and effective maternity care:“By the time they struggled to get her an admission card, by the time she was admitted, by the time her file was made up, by the time the midwife was called, by the time the midwife finished eating, by the time the midwife came, by the time the husband went and bought some gloves, by the time the midwife examined the woman, by the time the doctor could be found, by the time the husband went out to buy drugs, IV set, drip and bottle of ether, by the time the haematologist was called, by the time the haematologist came and took blood from the poor tired husband, by the time the day and night nurses changed duty, by the time the day and night doctors changed duty, by the time the t’s had been properly crossed and all the i’s dotted and the husband signed the consent form, the woman died.”Extract from a letter by F Tahzib, University of Sokoto, Nigeria (1989), cited in Thaddeus & Maine (1994)Although it was written almost 30 years ago, this powerful excerpt serves to illustrate some of the numerous and persistent barriers that still prevent many women from receiving effective and timely care, even once they reach a health facility.A group of researchers from the University of Oxford decided to examine the literature on this topic in order to better understand these facility-level (otherwise known as Phase III) delays.  Previous studies had tended to focus on the challenges women face in reaching a hospital on time, rather than what happened once they arrived.PLOS has now published this systematic review in its MHTF-PLOS Maternal Health Collection. The review identifies 32 different barriers that can prevent women from receiving timely and appropriate obstetric care once they arrive at a medical facility, and classifies these into 6 categories: human resources; drugs and equipment; facility infrastructure; policy and guidelines; patient-related and referral-related.The most commonly cited barriers in the literature were:inadequate training/skills mixdrug procurement/logistics problemsstaff shortageslack of equipmentlow staff motivationTwo important conclusions emerge from this work and are worth highlighting:Although patient-side delays in the decision to seek care and in reaching a medical facility are responsible for a great number of maternal deaths, focusing only on these delays can mask the fact that many health facilities in the developing world are still chronically under-resourced and unable to cope effectively with serious obstetric complications. Providers and policy-makers must work together to address supply-side barriers alongside demand-side factors if further reductions in maternal mortality are to be achieved.Simple, replicable tools to assess facility-level barriers are badly needed to assist health managers in identifying facilities that deliver sub-optimal care, and in both making and monitoring the required improvements. No generally accepted methodology exists and this makes comparisons between countries very difficult. The authors call for the introduction of benchmark indicators that assess the content and quality of maternal care, rather than the rates of skilled attendance at birth alone.Read the systematic review. Take a look at the MHTF-PLOS Maternal Health Collection.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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Poor Fetal and Infant Growth is Not Inevitable in Poor Countries

first_imgPosted on July 7, 2014November 4, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)For the first time it can be said that fetal growth and birth size is not predetermined by genetics, but by the health status of the mother. Fetal growth and birthlength are incredibly similar when babies are born to well-nourished, well-educated mothers—despite diverse ethnic and genetic backgrounds.Today INTERGROWTH-21st, an international study led by researchers at Oxford University, published its first results paper of the project, which proves the previously held belief that size and growth of babies differ due to ethnicity and race is not true. This has tremendous implications on the importance of maternal health care and interventions.“Currently we are not all equal at birth. But we can be,” said the lead author Professor Jose Villar of the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, University of Oxford. “We can create a similar start for all by making sure mothers are well educated and nourished, by treating infection and by providing adequate antenatal care. Don’t tell us nothing can be done. Don’t say that women in some parts of the world have small children because they are predestined to do so. It’s simply not true.”In order to study fetal and infant growth around the world, researchers studied nearly 60,000 pregnancies in eight defined urban areas in Brazil, China, India, Italy, Kenya, Oman, the UK and the USA. Using identical methodologies and equipment, researchers performed ultrasounds from early pregnancy through delivery to measure fetal bone growth and at delivery measured birth length and head circumference. This representative data is the first of its kind.But why is it so important to have these standards and understand what affects fetal and infant growth? Currently no single global standard for fetal growth exists, instead there are at least 100 differing standards, posing problems for both identifying and treating undernourished newborns. “This is very confusing for doctors and mothers and makes no biological sense. How can a fetus or a newborn be judged small in one clinic or hospital and treated accordingly, only for the mother to go to another city or country, and be told that her baby is growing normally,” said Professor Stephen Kennedy, University of Oxford, one of the senior authors of the paper. The standard produced by the INTERGROWTH-21st fixes this problem. The standard serves as a global standard for fetal and infant growth—the first of its kind—and is consistent with existing WHO standards for infants. For example, the mean length at birth of the newborns in the INTERGROWTH-21st study was 49.4 ± 1.9 cm, compared with 49.5 ±1.9 cm in the WHO infant study.The INTERGROWTH-21st growth standard will help maternal and neonatal practitioners around the world address the problem of poor growth. As of 2010, 27% of births around the world, or 32.4 million babies a year in low- and middle-income countries, are born already undernourished. Poor growth evident by small for gestational age babies has a significant implication on an infant’s start to life—putting them at increased risk of illness and death compared to babies well-nourished at birth. Small birth size also increases a person’s risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease in adulthood. In addition, caring for undernourished newborns puts incredible strain and economic burdens on health systems and societies.Until now it was thought disparities in growth were largely determined by unchangeable factors, like genetics. Now we know the ability to close disparities and ensure fetal and infant growth and health is in our hands. Professor Zulfiqar Bhutta, from The Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan and the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada, who is the Chair of the Steering Committee of this global research team, says: “The fact that when mothers are in good health, babies grow in the womb in very similar ways the world over is a tremendously positive message of hope for all women and their families. But there is a challenge as well. There are implications in terms of the way we think about public health: This is about the health and life chances of future citizens everywhere on the planet. All those who are responsible for health care will have to think about providing the best possible maternal and child health.”Poor growth is not inevitable. Knowing that all babies can grow at the same rate empowers us to provide appropriate care—evidence-based care that ensures healthy mothers, healthy babies.To read the full article on these new standards, click here. In addition, more information about the INTERGROWTH-21st Project, including updates on the release of the new growth standards, can be found at its website: www.intergrowth21.orgShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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