Ethyn Moshoudis 14 found safe and well

first_imgPolice ended the search to find missing Doreen teen Ethyn Moshoudis, aged 14, on Thursday after he was found alive and well.The boy had gone missing from his home on 23 May, and both police and family had concerns for his welfare due to his age.READ MORE: Tears for Courtney (Konstandina) Herron: Who was the young woman whose death has sparked debate?The police told Neos Kosmos that the young teenager that was sought around a wide range of areas that he frequented was found and is safe with his family. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Food is more expensive in Cyprus and Greece compared to the EU

first_imgThe price level of a comparable basket of food and non-alcoholic beverages across the European Union (EU) was twice as high in the most expensive Member State than in the cheapest one in 2018.Food prices in Greece were 5.2 per cent above the EU average, according to Eurostat, at a time when disposable incomes in Greece have dropped during the economic crisis.In the category of milk, cheese and eggs, Cyprus has the highest levels, followed by Greece.Denmark had the highest price level for food and non-alcoholic beverages in the EU in 2018, at 130 per cent of the EU average, followed by Luxembourg and Austria (both 125 per cent), Ireland and Finland (both 120 per cent) and Sweden (117 per cent). At the opposite end of the scale, the lowest price levels were observed in Romania (66 per cent), Poland (69 per cent), Bulgaria (76 per cent), Lithuania (82 per cent), Czechia (84 per cent) and Hungary (85 per cent).Greece is also the most expensive country in the EU28 in telecommunications, including internet connections and telecom products.These data are published by Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Electronic platform for primary residence protection in Greece is now online

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram The electronic platform for protecting primary residences from foreclosure in Greece went online on Monday, July 1.Special Secretary for Managing Private Debt, Fotis Kourmousis, told the Athens Macedonia News Agency that 180,000 homes can qualify for protection using the electronic platform. It also offers information about a state subsidy that can reach up to 50 per cent of monthly installments.Applicants are means-tested for both property assets and income in order to be part of the programme. They can only be aprt of it if their assets are under 250,000 euros and their income is under 36,000 euros per annum.Banks of applicants will propose a favourable debt settlement for applicants, who then should decide whether they wish to take advantage of the offer.Information on eligibility criteria can be found HERE. last_img read more

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The Greek islands forgotten emergency as neglect exposes asylum seekers to abuse

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram With national elections coming up in less than a week in Greece, the widespread public debate about the country’s economy and future is not surprising. Unfortunately, other important issues are not getting the same attention.This was brought home to me last week on a visit to Lesbos, the Greek island where thousands of asylum seekers are trapped due to an EU-backed policy that prevents them from travelling to the mainland where services are better.In 2015, the world’s attention was focused on this issue, and it was a top priority for the Greek government. Now that attention has faded, but the problems remain.More than 16,500 asylum seekers are trapped on Greek islands, most in the severely overcrowded “hotspot” camps. The largest, Moria camp on Lesbos, holds more than 5,000 people, while on Samos, a camp for 648 people, currently holds more than 3,600. Hundreds are forced to live in the forest surrounding the Samos camp. Thousands of children don’t have access to schools and vulnerable asylum seekers, including pregnant women and people with disabilities, can’t access critical services.What was most disheartening about my visit is that there has been backsliding on key areas of progress. Asylum procedures have slowed down, services are short-staffed, and arrivals of asylum seekers from Turkey are increasing, with serious consequences for those in need.READ MORE: How cashless programmes to support refugees’ independence can restrict their freedoms“Authorities are again registering unaccompanied children as adults,” an NGO worker told me. Human Rights Watch documented in 2017 how unaccompanied migrant children on Lesbos were being incorrectly identified as adults and housed with unrelated adults, leaving them vulnerable to abuse and unable to access care they need. The government took steps to halt what was happening, but it seems to have re-started.“There’s no psychologist in the camp [the Moria hotspot] since the beginning of May, and before that there was no doctor since October,” said another NGO worker. She explained that the lack of a psychologist combined with slow procedures means that at-risk asylum seekers – like victims of torture, gender-based violence survivors, people with invisible disabilities, or unaccompanied children – are not identified by the authorities and given the attention they need. The modest improvements in support in the previous year appear to have been lost.READ MORE: Condolences for Greek Australian ‘Baker of Kos’ who gave bread to refugeesWhoever leads Greece’s next government should pay a visit to Lesbos and make the Aegean Island’s emergency a priority again.Eva Cosse is a Human Rights Watch researcher for Western Europe.last_img read more

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Makronissos former prison island in Greece declared archaeological site

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram The Greek island of Makronissos has been declared an area of archaeological interest.The decision was announced on Tuesday 2 July by the Central Archaeological Council (KAS), the Greek Culture Ministry’s advisory body on the protection of antiquities.The proposal was made by the Cyclades Ephorate of Antiquities, which has been conducting field expeditions on the uninhabited island over the past few years.Located close to the eastern coast of Attica, Makronissos was known during antiquity as ‘Helena’, said to have been named for Helen of Troy. It protected the harbours of Thoricus and Sunium.In Greece’s more recent history, the island served as a prison site during the Greek Civil War (1946-1949) up until the restoration of democracy, where a number of leftists were exiled until after the collapse of the military dictatorship in 1974.READ: Over €16 million in funding for preservation and restoration of cultural heritage sites in the PeloponneseAccording to the Culture Ministry, Makronissos has been protected by the Greek state since 1989.“It was declared a historic site and the remains of the camps where the exiles were housed were declared protected buildings,” the Culture Ministry said in a press release.Further excavations on the island have continued to show that it is a rich source of history, with five ancient shipwrecks discovered, dating back to the mid-Hellenistic and the post-Roman era.“The declaration of the whole island as an archaeological site completes the long-term protection of Makronissos’ man-made objects by all the competent authorities of the Ministry of Culture.”READ: Greek Archaeological Council agrees on shelter to protect shackled skeletons of Paleo Falirolast_img read more

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Ethnic Greek Thymios Liolis war monument vandalised in Northern Epirus

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram On Wednesday 24 July 2019, the Greek minority village of Krania in Albania was rocked by the sound of explosions. Suspected ultra-nationalist, irredentist Albanian groups attacked and dynamited the monument erected in the town to Thymios Liolis, an ethnic Greek who fought in the Balkan Wars for the liberation of Macedonia and for the autonomy of Northern Epirus. The word “Çamëria,” which is the Albanian word for Thesprotia, in Greece was found spray painted across the fragments of the monument, referring to Albanian irredentist claims over north western Greece.The historical personage of Thymios Liolis has been the subject of protracted hate campaigns in the Albanian media of late, with documentaries being screened accusing the native Greek minority of the region of being disloyal by honouring the memory of Thymios Liolis, considered a traitor in Albanian nationalistic circles, for his advocacy of the rights of the native ethnic Greeks in the region.READ MORE: Multicultural Epirus: populations, languages and education during the last years of the Ottoman EmpireThe monument to Thymios Liolis in Krania has been vandalized several times in the past. The Foreign Ministry of Greece has expressed its disgust at the act of vandalism, calling upon the Albanian government to apprehend the perpetrators and bring them to justice, and to restore a sense of security in the part of the country inhabited by native ethnic Greeks. The Panepirotic Federation of Australia has also condemned the crime, stating that acts of this nature are not commensurate with a civil developed society, or Albania’s projected membership of the European Union. Its secretary, Dean Kalimniou, called upon the Albanian government to respect the human rights of the Greeks of Northern Epirus and to take steps to guarantee their security from racist attacks.last_img read more

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