Education Ministry to Green Schools

first_imgEducation Ministry to Green Schools EducationJuly 14, 2010 RelatedEducation Ministry to Green Schools RelatedEducation Ministry to Green Schools FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Minister of Education, Hon. Andrew Holness, has said that the Ministry will be looking to plant more trees at schools, particularly those built near roadways, to reduce the harmful effects of dust and vehicle emissions, among other elements, on children.Minister of Education, Hon. Andrew HolnessHe noted that some schools do not have sufficient trees, which are pivotal in reducing dust nuisance, “and so we will pursue this as an immediate thing that we can do.”Minister Holness was speaking at a ceremony held on July 12 at the Cabinet Office in Kingston, where he and Health Minister, Hon. Rudyard Spencer, were presented with a video promoting the Kiwanis Environmental Health and Learning Initiative (KEHLI), which is aimed at improving the learning environment of urban schools.The video, titled ‘Choking on Air’, which was viewed by the Ministers, highlighted some of the harmful effects of pollutants in the environment to school children in these areas.Minister Holness pointed out that education and health are symbiotic, with the environment being the connection. “You need education to improve the environment and clearly, the environment improves the education of our children. So, we intend to pursue this project and incorporate it in our plan going forward,” the Minister said.A project of the Kiwanis Club of New Kingston, KEHLI focuses on reducing environmental factors in schools that may lead to learning and developmental disorders. These factors include air quality, lighting, noise, toxic chemicals, sanitation and food safety.Managing Director and Consulting Principal of Environmental Solutions Limited, which is collaborating on the project, Eleanor B. Jones, said environmental health issues are extremely important to education.She noted that environmental triggers such as roadside dust, emissions from automobiles and industrial and commercial facilities, commercial and domestic chemicals, and poor ventilation, are of particular concern.“If we really want to talk about development and we want to talk about giving the best to our children, we have to look at those issues that affect their ability to learn, and also the issue of absenteeism from school, because, if they are ill all the time and they can’t attend school, they can’t learn,” she pointed out.Environmental Health Officer at Environmental Solutions, Rashidah Khan-Haqq informed that the project has been launched in eight schools so far and that sampling has been done in three of the schools. The air quality was monitored in selected schools that were considered to be in high risk environments.She said the results have shown that roadways are significant pollutants to schools. She pointed out that the greening of schools, especially those that are near to roadways is very important because trees and grass act as cleansers.“We have kids being exposed to very fine particulate matter and they are small enough…to get into the blood stream. Studies are showing that particulate matter inside of the bloodstream can have very serious adversarial effect, especially in kids,” she said.Ms. Jones said sensitisation programmes have already started in the schools, noting that greening has started in a limited way, because some of the schools do not have a lot of space.“But, you can do container planting …so that you put in place the vegetation, which will help to absorb some of these particulates. We also have to engage the children in how to manage their surroundings,” she said.center_img RelatedEducation Ministry to Green Schools Advertisementslast_img read more

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Jamaicans Must Unite – Governor General

first_imgRelatedJamaicans Must Unite – Governor General Jamaicans Must Unite – Governor General Governor GeneralOctober 12, 2010 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Governor-General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, has added to the call for Jamaicans to unite and pool their talents and resources for the country’s welfare.He made the appeal in a message read by Custos of St. James, Hon. Ewen Corrodus at the National Heritage Week thanksgiving service held yesterday (October 10) at the New Testament Church of God in Montego Bay.“We are getting closer to our 50th year of becoming a sovereign independent state. It is important that as Jamaicans at home and in the Diaspora, we consolidate our efforts, our talents and our resources, so that together we can achieve the dreams and visions of our heroes,” the Governor-General stated.Prime Minister, the Hon. Bruce Golding (2nd right), shares warm greetings with Bishop Rudolph Daley (2nd left), Chairman of the Committee for the Promotion of National Religious Services. Occasion was the National Heritage Week thanksgiving service held yesterday (Oct. 10) at the New Testament Church of God located on Water Lane, Montego Bay.He noted that the journey of nationhood has many challenges, but despite the setbacks and events that sometimes cause despair, “we must believe in our people, our land and our heritage and, encouraged by the knowledge of the strength and courage of our heroes, ensure that Jamaica becomes a peaceful, productive and prosperous nation.”“I encourage all Jamaicans to get into action now for the sake of our nation. Believe in yourselves and in each other so that together we can make Jamaica a habitable place,” His Excellency urged.Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture, Hon. Olivia Grange, Minister Grange, in her contribution, said that Jamaicans are “products of a mighty heritage” and a legacy of struggle for freedom and justice.“Our ancestors made the ultimate sacrifice so we can be here today in the house of God singing songs of thanksgiving. Through them, we are able to see our children grow to choose their own form of livelihood and make decisions for their own present and future,” she said.She encouraged Jamaicans to seek to make a difference by extending a hand to the less fortunate. “We can adopt a school, a child, a hospital ward, a street person, a neighbour’s child. We can engage conversation with a youth on the corner, rather than pass by on the other side. We can extend our hand rather than our voices in criticism. Let us ask God to teach us true respect for all and to help us to stand up for justice, brotherhood and peace and play our part in advancing the welfare of Jamaica and the whole human race,” Minister Grange urged.The ‘Singing Jewels,’ winners of the 2010 National Children’s Gospel Song Competition, perform the song ‘I Believe in You’ at the National Heritage Week thanksgiving service held on Sunday (Oct.10) at the New Testament Church of God, Water Lane, Montego Bay.Pastor of the Church of God Jamaica, Rev. Milton Davidson, who delivered the sermon, said he believes in Jamaica.“I believe in Jamaica and I don’t believe that we have to reach a state of desolation. We must admit that we need guidance, we need God. We have what it takes to make it. If half the minds that are used in ingenious ways to practice evil are turned to correct and to make good, we would be ahead in the world today,” Rev. Davidson asserted.Prime Minister, the Hon. Bruce Golding, read the first lesson, which came from Psalm 34: 1- 8.Others in attendance were Minister of Water and Housing and Member of Parliament for North West St. James, Hon. Dr. Horace Chang; and Leader of Opposition Business in the House of Representatives, Derrick Kellier, who represented the Leader of the Opposition, the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller.National Heritage Week is being observed from October 11 to 15 under the theme: ‘I believe in Jamaica . our people, our land, our heritage’. RelatedJamaicans Must Unite – Governor Generalcenter_img RelatedJamaicans Must Unite – Governor General Advertisementslast_img read more

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Jimenez goes low, Maggert leading, Kelly lurking

first_imgPHOENIX — Jeff Maggert kept the lead Saturday in the Charles Schwab Cup Championship, while Miguel Angel Jimenez went low and Jerry Kelly had one of the best rounds of the day to get back in the fight for the PGA Tour Champions’ season points title. Maggert birdied the par-5 18th for a 2-under 69 and a one-stroke lead over Jimenez with one round left in the season finale at Phoenix Country Club. Maggert sits at 16 under through three rounds. He has led all three days, opening with rounds of 63 and 65. Jimenez birdied the final two holes for a 63. He won the playoff opener last month in Virginia. Retief Goosen, the last of the five players in the field with a chance to take the season Charles Schwab Cup title, was third at 14 under after a 66. Joe Durant (65) was 13 under, and Berhard Langer (69) and Woody Austin (65) were 12 under. Maggert (69) looks to play more aggressively Sunday at Charles Schwab Cup Championship Full-field scores from the Charles Schwab Cup Championship Kelly, second behind Scott McCarron in the standings, followed a second-round 74 with a 64 to move into a tie for 12th at 9 under. Kelly would win the season championship with a victory and could take it with a solo sixth-place finish if McCarron – tied for 25th at 4 under after a 69 – ends up in a three-way tie for 18th or worse. McCarron would take the title no matter where he finishes if Kelly finishes in a two-way tie for eighth or worse and Langer, Colin Montgomerie and Goosen fail to win. Langer is still in the mix for his record sixth season title. Third entering the week, the 62-year-old German star needs to win the event and have McCarron finish in a two-way tie for fifth or worse and Kelly finish in a two-way tie for second or worse. Langer is coming off a playoff loss to Montgomerie on Sunday in California in the second playoff event. Montgomerie, fourth in the standings, was tied for 10th at 10 under after a 67. Like Langer, Montgomerie and Goosen also needs to win the tournament and get help from McCarron and Kelly to take the season title. Maggert won three times on the PGA Tour and has five senior victories, one in 2014 and four in 2015.last_img read more

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Making the grade: examining accreditation schemes

first_img The Law Society’s 11 practice area accreditation schemes are undergoing a thorough review.The schemes cover immigration and asylum, criminal litigation, mediation, clinical negligence, personal injury, planning, children, family, advanced family, family mediation and mental health. When the Society split its regulatory and representative roles, all the accreditation schemes went to the Solicitors Regulation Authority.In 2009, however, the Society took the voluntary schemes back under its wing, arguing that they were a reputational issue. While membership is required by the Legal Services Commission in areas such as crime, mental health and children, it is still up to solicitors whether they choose to do publicly funded work. The SRA administers the higher rights, police station representation and insolvency schemes as they are compulsory and therefore deemed to be a regulatory issue.Maureen Miller, head of membership development, says: ‘Once we had set up a robust governance programme, we appointed chief assessors to review the schemes covering crime, immigration, family, children and mental health and ensure the content is relevant and up to date.’The review is due to be completed by the end of June, with the assessors recommending how the schemes can be enhanced, for instance by introducing a career-development, tiered approach. Miller says they will also be setting down criteria for establishing schemes and considering new specialist areas such as private client. Stronger position People and culture Seeking accreditation takes time and resources, so how do you assess the cost/benefit relationship? There is a price to be paid in terms of accreditation and (possibly) consultancy fees, says Guise, but otherwise there are only ‘upsides’. ‘The friction of bringing about cultural change in a firm which does not have Lexcel is not to be underestimated. That’s why I got my firm accredited in 2003 when I set up, so there was no backsliding from subsequent joiners.’ Marsh has no doubts about CQS: ‘Every single firm is running a business, so you have to prioritise. If the market wants you to have a certain level of credibility through a scheme like this then you sit down and do it.’ He is concerned that consultants are quoting around £2,500 to get a firm CQS accreditation. ‘It is the fear factor,’ he says. ‘A small firm might do that but these companies are exploiting their anxiety. Generally, you don’t need to pay for advice. You need to understand your business and fill out a form.’ One significant benefit could be a reduction in professional indemnity insurance premiums. All the schemes are talking to brokers and insurers about what would make the accreditation more attractive to them. Accreditation in particular work areas is not a factor which, on its own, will ‘make or break’ a decision to underwrite, says John Kunzler, senior product manager with PI underwriters Travelers. Even so, it is generally viewed positively, as are quality systems, when taken as part of a complete picture of what a firm is doing. He adds: ‘We are always very interested in hearing about actions that solicitors take to manage risk proactively. However, there is not yet any data of which we are aware which indicates that reaching a specific standard and agreeing to adopt certain processes makes a firm with an accreditation a superior risk over a well-managed firm without such an accreditation.’ He says the CQS may allocate supervisory responsibility more clearly and improve individual competence, which may in turn help prevent process errors. ‘However, from information available in the assigned risks pool, a good number of the conveyancing claims that have occurred over the last few years appear to be caused by organised crime gangs conducting large-scale fraud operations,’ he says. ‘Identity theft of professionals to set up fake law firms also seems to be on the increase. ‘The prevention of fraud is an area upon which effort needs to focus, which could include adding anti-fraud measures and regular review of those measures as part of any scheme.’ Marsh says insurers ‘caught a bad cold’ by not being able to evaluate properly the risk of insuring individual firms. ‘CQS is aimed at the sorts of risks they are anxious about and it will help them evaluate whether the firm is one they want to insure,’ he maintains. ‘One key measure is that anybody within the firm connected with the conveyancing, including the accounts department and all partners, has to be CRB [Criminal Records Bureau] checked.’ The CQS has been welcomed by the Council of Mortgage Lenders (CML). Marsh says it is too early to say whether lenders will start requiring panel firms to have CQS. ‘Lenders have made it clear that they want some “wriggle room” because there will be certain firms with such a high reputation or with whom they already have a special relationship where they will feel it is not necessary,’ he explains. ‘For the others, it will be a case of needing a good reason why they aren’t accredited.’ CML spokesman Bernard Clarke says it would like to see a ‘healthy take-up’ of the scheme. ‘We hope it will provide reassurance and reinforce confidence and that lenders will come to regard it as a prerequisite for admission to their panels.’ With increasing emphasis on accreditation schemes, could they have an impact on diversity? ‘We are very alive to this risk,’ says Linda Lee, ‘which is why we are running equality impact assessments on all our accreditation schemes.’ So, with the profession increasingly focusing on the value of schemes in boosting firms’ appeal, the key now will be to increase public awareness. How soon before a character in a soap is asking if their conveyancer is CQS-accredited? Education and training review The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA), the Bar Standards Board (BSB) and the Institute of Legal Executives Professional Standards (IPS) are working together to undertake a fundamental review of the legal education and training requirements of individuals and entities delivering legal services. The review will commence next month and is expected to report by November 2012. The scope of the review is wide ranging, and covers accreditation, alongside education, training, qualifications, and regulation. It will examine regulated and non-regulated legal services. Recommendations will cover the following areas: Some firms seeking recognition of their standards have chosen either ISO9000 or Investors in People (IIP), although some have all three badges to their names. So, how do you choose? Warner says: ‘Lexcel is sector-specific but it has a low profile and lack of client recognition. However, both it and ISO9000 will improve a firm’s procedures. ‘IIP will unlock new opportunities by focusing more on people and culture, which is where lawyers need to focus to create more business agility.’ Jarratt views the other standards as both complementary and as competition. ‘It is not just about collecting badges,’ she says. ‘IIP is very people management-focused but it is a standard which can be applied for by any industry – ours is focused on law firms and in-house legal departments.’ Interest in Lexcel is certainly picking up, says Guise. ‘Interestingly, the foundation of QualitySolicitors’ claim to be “quality” is the insistence that all member firms are Lexcel-accredited or commit to becoming so. In other words, they are piggybacking on the Society’s 13 years of investment in the mark.’ APIL set up its accreditation scheme, which recognises different levels of competency from senior litigator to senior fellow, in 1999. About 30% of its 5,000 members are accredited, along with about 250 firms. ‘We are focusing on increasing public awareness of the scheme so it becomes a recognisable, trusted quality mark,’ says chief executive Denise Kitchener. ‘We are also developing competency standards which will offer benchmarks for firms in the high street.’ Firms use the mark as part of their branding, she says. ‘Consumers are becoming increasingly aware of the need to find specialist help. This is an extra, independent stamp which offers reassurance through rigorous assessment.’ Savvy clientsResolution has also found potential clients becoming more savvy in searching for specialists. Two-thirds of those who search its website for a solicitor go on to search for a specialist in a raft of areas, including adoption, child abduction, small and big money cases, cohabitation and a new category of forced marriage. Some 1,500 of its 5,500 members are accredited. Standards director Jacqui Jackson says the scheme encourages career progression by allowing two years’-qualified practitioners to do part one of the requirements, completing the rest of the assignments once they reach the required minimum of five years’ post-qualified experience. Those fully accredited get a 15% uplift in legal aid rates for exceptional cases that fall outside the fixed fee. Jackson says Resolution is considering creating an accreditation scheme in advocacy skills, but is waiting to see what happens with the scheme being piloted for criminal lawyers. It is also revamping its accreditation scheme for independent financial advisers: ‘We set that up because we found the standard was extremely variable. We didn’t get it quite right so we are hoping to relaunch it with a whole new set of standards next month.’ Resolution also runs a mediation accreditation scheme, with 50 of its 346 trained mediators achieving the badge. Many of the others are working towards it but have yet to undertake sufficient mediations to prepare their portfolio. Mediations are likely to increase substantially following a new emphasis on mediation by the government. The new pre-action protocol will require couples seeking to contest the terms of their separation to attend a mediation awareness session before they can go to court, unless there are domestic violence or child protection issues. Schemes under the microscope What it’s worth A campaign to raise public awareness of the Law Society’s accreditation schemes and their value in helping people choose firms or specialist practitioners in increasingly competitive markets will be launched shortly. There is growing interest within the profession about the schemes. The new Conveyancing Quality Scheme (CQS), which was launched in January, has already attracted more than 660 applications; nearly 1,000 practices are now accredited with Lexcel; and more than 15,000 legal professionals are members of the 11 practice area schemes, which are undergoing a major review (see box). The next step, says Maureen Miller, the Society’s head of membership development, is to raise the schemes’ profile with the public. ‘There was a storyline in Coronation Street last year involving a family dispute, when one of those involved said they needed to employ a family solicitor who was “on the Law Society’s accreditation panel” – that is the kind of recognition you need.’ Representative groups such as the family lawyers organisation Resolution and the Association of Personal Injury Lawyers (APIL) also have accreditation schemes. So, to what extent are firms using such schemes as part of their branding efforts and how important will they become when legal markets open up later in the year? The solicitor brand itself is incredibly strong, stresses Law Society president Linda Lee: ‘However, consumers are becoming more demanding and are focusing on differentiation and specialism. Accreditation schemes provide solicitors with another tool to set themselves apart from other providers and harness the very considerable power of the Law Society brand.’ Grania Langdon-Down is a freelance journalist Pressure to introduce accreditation schemes, Lee says, follows demands from public sector purchasers of legal services, for instance in family law, and market developments, hence the CQS: ‘What they have in common is putting the accredited solicitor into a stronger position to win business.’ ‘Members of the public struggle to compare services,’ says Peter Warner, a specialist in regulation and compliance with Inpractice UK consultancy. ‘So the more apparently relevant boxes a firm can tick, the more attractive they will be to potential customers. ‘Being able to tick the accreditation boxes when tendering for business will also be vital, as new entrants to the legal market won’t be put off by the need to get these accreditations – they will just do it as a routine part of business. ‘However, lawyers with well informed and satisfied clients won’t lose them to another firm just because it has more accreditations.’ Tony Guise, of Guise Solicitors, agrees: ‘Accreditation is not the be all and end all to winning work. However, it goes positively into the mix if one is pitching for institutional work, which should increasingly be targeted by solicitors, as limited added-value work is siphoned off by alternative business structures.’ The CQS has certainly had an encouraging start. Paul Marsh, of Surrey-based Downs Solicitors and past president of the Law Society, is a member of the CQS project board: ‘Some doubting Thomases thought this wouldn’t take off but we have had nearly 700 applications in the first three months.’ So far, 29 firms have been accredited. It is proving a steep learning curve for some – the operations team has found applications that have not been completely filled in, for example, with key information missing. Firms will have to reapply annually. ‘We have designed the scheme so it maintains its quality and standards,’ Marsh explains. When it comes to Lexcel, Francis Dingwall, a partner with professional indemnity and regulatory solicitors Legal Risk, says it is a valuable threshold for good practice management. Beyond that, it is a ‘starting point, not an end point’, he notes, adding: ‘There are firms with Lexcel that are good and bad and it can give a false sense of security. ‘There have been some major mortgage frauds and major negligence at Lexcel-accredited firms. You need to look at the substance, beyond the procedures, and Lexcel does not, in itself, do that for you.’ Lexcel manager Clare Jarratt says work is under way on an updated version, which will take into account the views of stakeholders (such as personal injury insurers, brokers, banks and in-house legal teams) on what would make it more attractive to them. Jarratt says the numbers accredited or applying are encouraging. Accredited firms include a quarter of the top-100 firms, with 40% being sole practitioners to 10-partner firms. The 150 accredited in-house teams range from one to 40 fee-earners. ‘It is not a simple thing for practices to achieve,’ she says. ‘The fact that we have roughly 1,000 practices in England and Wales and a handful overseas, which are being annually assessed for an optional scheme in which they are investing significant time and resources, is a very good achievement. ‘We also have a 95% retention rate, with some firms maintaining the Lexcel badge since the scheme was launched in 1998.’International firms and the international offices of UK firms have been able to seek accreditation since last year. ‘As international markets develop,’ Jarratt says, ‘quality assurance, accreditation and best practice across borders are going to be increasingly hot topics – how do you work with a firm if you have concerns about client service, process or risk management?’ The legal skills, knowledge and experience demanded from different kinds of lawyers, and other emerging roles in diverse, future legal services entities. The education and training system(s) required to deliver high-quality, competitive legal services and high ethical standards of practice for lawyers and legal services entities. Qualification routes that are responsive to emerging needs. An education and training system(s) that is responsive to different career pathways, promotes mobility and transferability between branches of the profession, and enables flexible, ongoing education and training options. The extent to which (if at all) formal regulation of legal education and training should be extended to include groups other than those currently regulated by the SRA, BSB, IPS and other approved regulators. Recommendations specific to the Legal Services Board, Approved Regulators and other relevant bodies from this review supported by an analysis against the better regulation principles. Sole practitioner Martin Elliott was one of the first to be accredited under the Conveyancing Quality Scheme. He plans to use it as an integral part of the branding of his firm Martin Elliott & Co Solicitors, which he set up in Colchester, Essex, 18 years ago, specialising in conveyancing, wills and probate.Already Lexcel-accredited for the last six years, he will be adding the CQS logo to his notepaper and website. ‘I am a great believer in it,’ he says. ‘As a small firm, it helps prove our credibility, which will be even more important when new entrants come into the market later in the year.’He has applied to two lenders’ panels, flagging up the accreditation. ‘It is early days but I hope the scheme will prove a real help for sole practitioners and small firms who have been badly hit by the way lenders are reducing their panels.’It took about a month to prepare the application. He used a consultant to get started with Lexcel but did the CQS application himself. ‘If you aren’t Lexcel-accredited, it might be useful to have help on the practice management side,’ he says. It is too soon to know if it will lead to a reduction in PII premiums, he says, adding: ‘Lexcel didn’t reduce our premium but it meant we were insurable when other small firms were struggling to get quotes.’He is optimistic that the CQS will prove a ‘robust’ scheme. ‘You have to send in client feedback every six months and I think anyone submitting poor feedback will be picked up pretty quickly. Once it gains critical mass, I think it will prove really valuable.’last_img read more

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Tyrone Appollis’s work honoured

first_imgStompie, a Tyrone Appollis sculpture inspired by James Seipei, who was also known as Stompie Moeketsi. He was a teenage United Democratic Front (UDF) activist from Parys. He and three other boys were kidnapped on December 29 1988 by members of Winnie Madikizela Mandelas bodyguards, known as the Mandela United Football Club. Stompie was murdered on January 1 1989. Activist and retired Constitutional Court judge Albie Sachs described Tyrone Appollis as an artist of inconvenience during the launch of the latter’s exhibition and documentary.Mr Sachs, who is a collector of Mr Appollis’s art, made the remark at the Sanlam Art Gallery in Bellville, where the launch took place on Tuesday March 14.Mr Appollis, who is originally from Bridgetown but now lives in Plumstead, said he could not agree more with that statement. He admitted that he would make his presence known during a somewhat quiet gathering by playing his penny whistle, just like Mr Sachs described.Although he held his first solo exhibition at the tender age of 14,Mr Appollis was given little formal recognition, and because of this, the Sanlam Art Gallery decided to honour his life and art shortly after his 60th birthday. The exhibition is a combination of his recent paintings and iconic examples of his earlier works, drawn from his private and public collections. It runs until Thursday April 13, and the opening was accompanied by the premier of the documentary Of My Time – Tyrone Appollis, by film-maker Ron Moller of Storyteller Productions.Mr Moller said the documentary was an intimate portrait of the artist, poet and musician. He was unsure where it would be screened next, but said he might use it as a pilot for a series if he could get broadcasters to invest.“The film explores the theme of artistic journey, as a reflection of the artist’s personal journey, and is an insight into Tyrone’s creative space filled with personal history, conflict, passion, resilience and personal and artistic successes,” Mr Moller said.Mr Appollis has also been described as a painter, who, over the past thirty years, created unique images of the times and places that made up his life and environment.Stefan Hundt, from the Sanlam Art Gallery, said: “There is little doubt that Tyrone is one of the Western Cape’s most talented painters. Yet, he has been given little official or formal recognition. His peculiar vision, formed by his understanding of Picasso, Van Gogh, Chagall, Cecil Skotnes and a plethora of Italian Renaissance painters, has provided unique perspective on life on the Cape Flats for more than 30 years.”Asked whether he was bitter his work had not in the past been given the recognition it deserved, Mr Appollis said: “I became a celebrity. I am not a whinger of the past. Ek is waar ek wil wees. Of my time.”People had not understood him in the past, lending him a degree of anonymity, he said.“I keep telling my friends who want to force me into teaching – after they mocked my beginnings at music, painting and writing – that they should ask Jonathan Butler or Johnny Clegg for lessons. I have taught extramural classes in the community in the past, but, at present, I am engrossed in catching up. I still have a lot of work to do before I will be taken seriously. My message to the people is that I can only say as much, or as little, as I do.”And his thoughts on the opening of the exhibition?“Exhibition openings are a hindrance, because there is food and drinks and trimmings. I would rather people come to buy my work, than to come for the trimmings. I must add, however, that this exhibition is wonderful, and I don’t want this feeling to subside.”Mario Pissarra, of the Africa South Art Initiative, said in order to understand Mr Appollis’s art, one had to grasp his conviction that “an artist must be of his time”.“His art is rooted in his geographic identity as a Capetonian, in his historic identity as a ‘coloured’ person, in his post-apartheid national identity as a South African, in his non-racial identity as an African, and in his humanistic identity as a member of the global community of artists. All of these identities co-exist in him as a person, and inform his art,” Mr Pissarra said.Mr Appollis was trained and worked as a sign writer, and later as a carpenter, but never completed the apprenticeship. He studied part-time at the Community Arts Project under artist Cecil Skotnes, and attended the Foundation School of Art for one year. He held his first solo exhibition at the age of 14, under the auspices of the Students’ Health And Welfare Centres Organisation (SHAWCO) and the Cape Flats Development Association (CAFDA). His other solo exhibitions include Rocklands library, in 1982; the South African Association of Arts, in 1988; Chelsea Gallery, in Wynberg, in 1992; Karren McKerron Gallery, in Johannesburg, in 1993; Sheraton Atlantis Hotel, Zurich, in 1997; The Framery Gallery, in Cape Town, in 2010; and Irma Stern Museum, last year. He also participated in many group exhibitions in South Africa and abroad.His current exhibition is on view at the Sanlam Art Gallery until Thursday April 13, Monday to Friday, from 9am to 4.30pm. 1 of 2 Stompie, a Tyrone Appollis sculpture inspired by James Seipei, who was also known as Stompie Moeketsi. He was a teenage United Democratic Front (UDF) activist from Parys. He and three other boys were kidnapped on December 29 1988 by members of Winnie Madikizela Mandelas bodyguards, known as the Mandela United Football Club. Stompie was murdered on January 1 1989.center_img Iris and Howard Burkat, second from left, and second from right, came all the way from New York to attend the exhibition opening. With them are, left, Shireen Appollis, and Tyrone Appollis.last_img read more

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DPSU awards 6 at 8th Biennial Delegates Conference

first_img Sharing is caring! LocalNews DPSU awards 6 at 8th Biennial Delegates Conference by: Dominica Vibes News – May 6, 2016 Share Share Tweetcenter_img Share 280 Views   no discussions Four individuals of the Dominica Public Service Union (DPSU) and two businesses were awarded on Wednesday 4 May 2016 for their dedicated service to the union.Michael Lance, Union Organizer and Administrator of the Group Health Insurance; Miranda George, office secretary at the DPSU Peter Joseph, who assists the union by keeping the keys, were awarded during the opening ceremony of the organization’s eighth Biennial Delegates Conference at the union’s conference room.Royette George was awarded for her dedication as shop steward by recruiting new members for the union.Beacon Insurance Company Limited was recognized for sustained medical insurance coverage to the DPSU, while the National Union of Government and Federation Workers (NUGFW) of Trinidad and Tobago for remarkable support and solidarity following the passage of Tropical Storm Erika in August 2015.The two part conference was held under the theme ‘Building Trade Union Unity; Consolidating for National Progress & Development’.Guest speaker Jullian Alleyne Bartlett, General Secretary of the National Union of Government and Federation Workers (NUGFW) of Trinidad and Tobago noted in her address that internal unity is necessary for any union to strive.“If the head of the union, the executives and the membership cannot share the same vision and effectively communicate that vision into unified action for the members and the country, that union is doomed only to exist and may ultimately perish,” she said.This unity is therefore achieved when both union and its members share a symbiotic relationship and both understand that they in fact need each other and when separated each become weaker.Mrs Bartlett lamented the fact that trade unions in Dominica still have not effectively been able to “rally the worker force and strengthen the unionized membership based on the work force”.The question which must be asked is why is it difficult for each union to penetrate the work force effectively, she said.This is a position that could be remedied if trade unions take a united approach and work cohesively she stated.Mrs. Bartlett continued that there is a larger vision that must be embraced from a national stand point.“Have the trade unions in Dominica been able to prove to the work force that they are indeed capable of remaining relevant in these changing times? Working together they can contribute to national progress that would in turn empower the work force to be a dynamic contributor as well.”She added that there is no getting around the fact that people now live in a global community and nations will never again be isolated striving to independent progression.“Therefore it should be understood that for Dominica to achieve national progress and development, there must be regional and even international solidarity.”As an affiliate of Public Service International, the Caribbean Public Services Association and the Caribbean Congress of Labour the Dominica Public Service Union has strived well Mrs. Bartlett said.“It has had firsthand experience in collaborating and information sharing with international bodies and has been able to transform this information into the benefits it has been able to win for its membership.”International unity generates the environment for growth and development at a rapid pace; it instigates accountability and challenges trade unions to raise their local mode of operations she continued.Thus “as members of an international body, trade unions are empowered and the influence of their affiliation weighs heavily with the local governments and organizations. In other words, affiliation with an international body has the power to give trade unions a mightier voice to address issues of workers…the voice of the working class remains vested in the trade unions,” she said.During the business segment of the delegates’ conference on Thursday 5 May, financial and audit reports were presented to members as well as the positioning of a new executive for the next two years.– / 6last_img read more

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Roger Federer beats Jeremy Chardy to reach Indian Wells quarter-finals

first_imgWorld No.1 Roger Federer eased past Jeremy Chardy 7-5 6-4 to breeze into the quarter-finals at the Indian Wells on Wednesday.The 36-year-old surrendered just three points on serve in the opening set and took control of the second with a crosscourt backhand winner that broke Chardy when tied at 4-4.”I like his play. He hits it big, has a big serve, big forehand,” said Federer, a five-time champion at Indian Wells.”The wind picked up, so you never know what’s going to happen. But I think we played really good tennis for most of the match.”Federer needed just one hour and 22 minutes to move to 15-0 for the year. The last time he began a season 15-0 was 2006 when he would finish the year with 12 titles and three Grand Slams.Federer will next face South Korea’s Chung Hyeon, who defeated Uruguay’s Pablo Cuevas 6-1 6-3. It will be a rematch of their Australian Open semi-final in January when Chung had to retire due to blistered feet.Juan Martin del Potro, a runner-up in Indian Wells in 2013, battled a bad back to outlast Leonardo Mayer 3-6 7-6(2) 6-3.”I was surprised by Mayer’s level today,” del Potro said. “I think I was very smart during the tiebreak. After that I turned the match around and took control of the points.”Next up for the Argentine is Germany’s Philipp Kohlschreiber, who advanced with a 6-4 7-6(1) win over France’s Pierre-Hugues Herbert.Kevin Anderson beat Spaniard Pablo Carreno Busta 4-6 6-3 7-6(6), the South African recording 16 aces in a victory that took him to a last eight tie against Croatian Borna Coric, who defeated American Taylor Fritz 6-2 6-7(6) 6-4.advertisementSam Querrey, the lone American remaining in the men’s draw, reached the quarters with a 6-3 6-4 win over Feliciano Lopez of Spain.(With inputs from Reuters)last_img read more

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Thank you India but this is just the beginning, says Sunil Chhetri

first_imgThe past fortnight has been massive for Indian football. Skipper Sunil Chhetri touched international 100 caps, fans turned up in huge numbers at the stadium to support their national team in the Intercontinental Cup 2018 and India clinched the trophy by beating Kenya 2-0 in the final.The most striking part of the Intercontinental Cup turned out to be the massive crowd that made it to the Mumbai Football Arena, the wheels of which were put in motion after Chhetri put up a video pleading fans to flock to stadiums for India matches.Except for India’s opener against Chinese Taipei, after which the captain made the appeal, the next three matches including the final saw a full house.The skipper thanked the fans for their support and urged them to sustain the buzz around Indian football.Also read – Sunil Chhetri’s achievement must not be overshadowed by Messi’s greatness”Thank you so much this is just the beginning. Every time we play for our country come up and support us in numbers. We’ll try our best to give you a show,” Chhetri told IndiaToday.in.The Bengaluru FC player shared he was hurt to see a thin crowd during India’s match against Chinese Taipei forcing him to record the video. India’s inaugural match against Taipei, which the hosts won 5-0, was watched by a little over 2000 people at the Mumbai Football Arena.”There were no emotions man, there were no thoughts. It was just something which I thought in the morning after the game against Chinese Taipei. I didn’t think too much before making the video, it was just in one take. And I didn’t even think before uploading it,” said Chhetri.advertisementAlso read – 2018 Intercontinental Cup: Virat Kohli lauds Sunil Chhetri’s Team India”Very happy with the traction it got. Thankful to all the eminent personalities who jumped in and spread the word and eventually when you see the stadium packed it feels good.”As India lifted the Intercontinental Cup trophy, once again, the charismatic captain was the source of inspiration behind the Blue Tigers’ successful run as he scored eight goals in the tournament including the two in the final.Chhetri, however, is not ready to rest on his laurels. With 2018 Asian Cup in his sight, the 33-year-old wants India to play more away games in order to get ready for the big boys.Also read – Sunil Chhetri brace helps India lift 2018 Intercontinental Cup”It’s just preparations,” Chhetri said. “To just play against Kenya and New Zealand brings different challenge. They were very organised that gave us a different challenge. We are happy that we got those games.”It’s very very important that we get more games, preferably away because our away form hasn’t been great. And also against tougher opponents because for sure UAE, Thailand and Bahrain are going to be three-four levels up. So we need to be as prepared as possible. I hope when we regroup in December, everyone comes prepared and improved,” Chhetri added.Also read – Aim to break into top 10 in Asia first, World Cup later: Sunil ChhetriWhile it was a convincing win in the final, India succumbed to a disappoint 2-1 loss to New Zealand in a league match of the tournament. The loss also put India’s weak bench strength in the spotlight and Chhetri admits that team needs to improve on multiple fronts ahead of the Asian Cup.”We have to improve a lot. We worked hard that’s why we won the tournament. New Zealand and Kenya were good opponents but Asian Cup opponents are going to be of different level. No matter how much we improve it might still be less. So it’s important right now to keep your head down and keep improving,” Chhetri said.Also read – Comparisons with Lionel Messi, Cristiano Ronaldo unfair: Sunil ChhetriChhetri was in New Delhi on Monday to congratulate the kids picked as India’s official match ball carriers for the 2018 World Cup in Russia under the initiative by KIA motors.last_img read more

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