Newsmaker: No. 9, Rules of Golf

first_imgIt wouldn’t be a full list of Newsmakers without including the Rules of Golf, which once again became the focal point of several key tournaments and now, it seems, may be simplified in the near future. The rule book took center stage at the ANA Inspiration, where a ball-marking gaffe of inches led to a critical four-shot penalty for Lexi Thompson. It became a hotly-debated topic, as a viewer call-in essentially determined the outcome of a major championship, and weeks later the USGA and R&A implemented a “reasonable judgment” standard to limit the power of video replay reviews. That action came months after the governing bodies announced a plan to simplify the rule book beginning in 2019. The proposed changes would eliminate penalties for tapping down spike marks, removing loose impediments in a hazard or hitting the flagstick while on the green. The dozens of new changes also included limiting the time for a lost ball search and allowing players to crouch near ground level when dropping out of a hazard. Full list of 2017 Newsmakers of the Year While the new changes received ample discussion, the rules in their current form still grabbed plenty of headlines over the summer. Jon Rahm was embroiled in not one but two rules controversies, first during his win at the Irish Open and again over moving a loose impediment at The Open. The PGA Tour curiously picked the Zurich Classic team event to hand out its first slow-play penalty in more than 20 years, while Bryson DeChambeau’s attempt to bring side-saddled putting back into style was hampered by the USGA. But perhaps the biggest rules storyline gained traction near the end of the year, as a chorus of voices continued to call for the ever-advancing golf ball to be rolled back. Players from Tiger Woods to Dustin Johnson threw their support behind the notion of using a reduced-distance tournament ball for professionals, while USGA chief executive Mike Davis seemed open to just such a possibility when citing the increased costs associated with maintaining bigger and longer courses. Whether 400-yard drives soon become a thing of the past or a shorter list of decisions leads to more enjoyable rounds, one thing remains clear: the impact of the Rules of Golf won’t be rolled back anytime soon. USGA and R&A propose significant changes to simplify Rules of Golf Article: USGA, R&A reveal proposed changes to Rules of Golf Article: Full list of proposed changes to the Rules of Golf Article: Reactions from Tiger, others on proposed rules changes USGA: New rules easier to read and apply Player reaction to new rules ‘largely positive’ Lexi Thompson loses in ANA Inspiration playoff after controversial four-stroke penalty Article: Weeks later, Lexi ruling still a heated topic Article: Lexi breaks down discussing ANA penalty Thompson assessed four-stroke penalty a day later Lexi breaks down in tears discussing ANA penalty Jon Rahm embroiled in two rules controversies Article: Rahm stands by ball mark mechanics after Irish Open controversy Article: Rahm skirts another rules infraction at Open Watch the Jon Rahm ball-placement controversy at Irish Open Rules official McFee: Rahm was off by ‘millimeters’ Debate rages over distance of golf ball, courses Article: USGA’s Davis calls impact of course expansion ‘horrible’ Article: USGA’s Davis considers ‘variable distance golf ball’ Tiger, DJ in favor of limiting golf ball distance Titleist CEO fires back at Davis over golf ball distance Bryson DeChambeau spars with USGA over non-conforming putter Article: One of DeChambeau’s side-saddle putters deemed non-conforming Article: DeChambeau blames USGA amid putting style switch Article: DeChambeau tweets apology for USGA remarks PGA Tour hands out first slow-play penalty in 22 yearslast_img read more

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George Clinton Shares Stories About Hiding A Crack Pipe From A Teenage Chelsea Clinton

first_imgNo name is more synonymous with funk music than George Clinton. Having led Parliament-Funkadelic, aka P-Funk, for decades upon decades, Clinton’s psychedelic influences helped to define a genre.Reflecting back on his years of success, Clinton sat down with the New York Post to share stories from his past, in advance of his forthcoming memoir, Brothas Be, Yo Like George, Ain’t That Funkin’ Kinda Hard on You?Clinton talks about his beginnings, playing in a band called The Parliaments, and the merging of that band and Funkadelic to create P-Funk. The article talks about the flamboyant costumes – Clinton says “I actually got freaked out when girls wanted me, because I figured they were weirder than me!” – and on-stage drug use, and even features a quote from Clinton about LSD’s effect on his digestive system. Clinton: “The thing about acid is that it ruins your stomach — it’s acid, after all. We were eating a lot of soul food at the time, too, so basically, we all spent hours in the bathroom and had more hemorrhoids than you could imagine.”The legend opens up about his use of crack-cocaine, unabashedly telling what is easily the best story in the interview: A teenage Chelsea Clinton came backstage after a show and asked for a picture. Startled by the Secret Service, George was forced to conceal a red-hot crack pipe in one hand while shaking the first daughter’s hand with the other. The subsequent picture was printed in People magazine. “You don’t give a f–k when you’re on crack.”Another time, he spent a night in jail with Sly Stone, as the duo were busted for possession in the parking lot of a Denny’s. And while drug use may have taken a toll on him financially – “I was running around and getting high. I didn’t pay enough attention to business” – the artist is still working on new music. He has an album out with Kendrick Lamar, with the same title as his memoir. The memoir is due out today, October 21st.last_img read more

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NASCAR bolsters international efforts with personnel moves

first_imgDAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (Jan. 30, 2018) – NASCAR today announced key leadership appointments across its growing international business landscape and the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series.Jim Cassidy has been named to the new leadership position of Chief International Officer, reporting into Steve O’Donnell, Executive Vice President and Chief Racing Development Officer. Charged with growing the NASCAR brand of racing internationally, Cassidy will oversee all international competition and commercial operations, building on the success of NASCAR’s three international series with the NASCAR Pinty’s Series in Canada, NASCAR PEAK Mexico Series and NASCAR Whelen Euro Series.“Jim brings nearly two decades of racing operations and industry leadership experience. He has worked tirelessly to grow our existing motorsports properties outside of the U.S and will lead our efforts to identify important growth opportunities internationally for our sport and its growing fanbase,” said O’Donnell.“NASCAR racing is broadcast in over 185 countries and territories, with race fans engaging stock car racing in person at events in Canada, Mexico and across Europe. The demand for NASCAR racing internationally has never been stronger and we look forward to bringing our sport closer to race fans everywhere,” said Cassidy.Joining Cassidy in these efforts will be Chad Seigler in the new position of Vice President, International Business Development. Seigler will draw upon a decade of successful industry sales experience to oversee all international sales and partnership marketing. Celeste Griffin-Churchill in the new position of Senior Director, International, Joe Balash in his current role as Director, International Competition, and Bob Duvall in his position as Senior Director, International & Weekly/Touring Business Development will play key roles in this area.NASCAR additionally announced that Ben Kennedy has been named to the leadership position of General Manager, NASCAR Camping World Truck Series. Kennedy will oversee all aspects of NASCAR’s popular truck series, working closely with Brad Moran, NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Managing Director, and Jeff Wohlschlaeger, Managing Director, Series Marketing to continue to deliver great racing, fan experience and marketing across this series. Kennedy will report into Elton Sawyer, Vice President, Competition and will work closely with O’Donnell and Steve Phelps, Executive Vice President and Chief Global Sales and Marketing Officer.“Ben will draw upon his years of experience across NASCAR’s grassroots and national series to bring valuable commercial and competition insights to our NASCAR Camping World Truck Series. With promising young drivers and experienced veterans battling it out in close, side-by-side racing, Ben truly understands from experience that every lap matters and we are excited about his future leadership in this important national series,” said Brent Dewar, President, NASCAR.last_img read more

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Data Suggests Opioid-related Overdose Deaths in Alaska Down

first_imgMeanwhile, UnitedHealthcare on Thursday announced steps it is taking surrounding its dental plans to address opioid concerns. According to the state, the total cost associated with its response to opioid abuse was $210.9 million in fiscal years 2017 and 2018. That includes federal funds, substance abuse treatment and recovery and prevention grants and treatment costs within the Department of Corrections. The state’s presentation to lawmakers indicated that 80 percent of those in Corrections custody have substance abuse issues. “Something’s working,” Jones said, adding later: “It is exciting news to see this trend.” FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Preliminary numbers released by the state indicate the number of opioid-related overdose deaths in Alaska fell between 2017 and 2018. The preliminary data showed there were 100 opioid-related overdose deaths in Alaska in 2017 and 58 last year. Jones said looking broadly at more than one substance is important as the state responds, noting Alaska has issues with other substances. Alcohol remains the state’s biggest problem, “by far,” he said. Some of the grant funding was specific to opioids but it mostly addressed substance use disorders generally, according to a state report. The state has passed a law addressing opioid prescriptions; sued opioid manufacturers, including the company that makes the prescription opioid painkiller OxyContin; and taken steps on prevention, treatment and enforcement. But Jones said there is more work to do. For example, the company said first-time opioid prescriptions written by dental health professionals for those 19 and younger will be capped at three days. Policy holders with dependents between 16 and 22 years old will get information about the risks associated with opioids. “The whole thing is that these issues are not helping us create healthy, safe communities that can thrive and prosper off of opportunity because it just takes opportunity away from them,” Michael Duxbury, deputy commissioner of the Department of Public Safety, said after the meeting. Andy Jones, director of the state Office of Substance Misuse and Addiction Prevention, told a Senate committee Thursday that this suggests steps being taken to address opioid abuse are working. In 2017, then-Gov. Bill Walker declared opioid abuse a public health disaster, and the Legislature approved a standing medical order for a naloxone distribution program through June 2021. Naloxone can help prevent overdose.last_img read more

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