Savanna closes on Garment District office with $388M loan

first_imgSavanna’s Chris Schlank and Nick Bienstock with 1375 Broadway (Credit: Google Maps)The private equity fund closed its $435 million purchase of 1375 Broadway from Westbrook Partners last week, Commercial Observer reports. In May, The Real Deal reported that the transaction could slow down Savanna’s fundraising efforts.To complete the deal, Savanna landed $388.5 million in financing from a consortium of lenders including Brookfield Real Estate Finance, investment firm Declaration Partners and two entities tied to Deutsche Pfandbriefbank and Aareal Capital Corporation.Read moreSavanna buying Garment District office building for $435MBig Midtown deal looms over Savanna’s latest fundraising effortThese were the largest Manhattan real estate loans in June Brookfield originated the senior and mezzanine debt, syndicating $200 million in senior debt to the German entities, and kept $103.5 million in mezzanine debt on its books.Declaration Partners, which is backed by the Carlyle Group’s co-founder and co-executive chairman David Rubenstein, took a $85 million equity stake.Savanna previously owned the Garment District building, paying Chedward Realty Corporation $135 million for the property in 2010. Savanna sold it to Westbrook in 2015 for $310 million.The sale and financing of the deal was brokered by Cushman & Wakefield. [CO] — Erin Hudson This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

Read More →

Stewardship / Resistance Scan for Sep 24, 2018

first_imgNew platform to detect and track drug-resistant infections in the worksThe office of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced today that the New York State Department of Health (DOH) will partner with ILÚM Health Solutions to develop a research program to detect, track, and manage antibiotic-resistant infections at healthcare facilities across the state.According to a press release from the governor’s office, DOH and ILÚM—a wholly owned subsidiary of Merck & Co.—will work together to develop an infectious disease platform and real-time information service that tracks drug-resistant organisms, patients, and outcomes,  delivers relevant insights to help healthcare providers make better treatments decisions, and connects DOH to state facilities. The collected data will also be used to aid in the development of new diagnostic tools.”Through public-private partnerships and investments in advanced research, New York State is working to help curb the spread of infectious diseases,” Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul said in the press release. “This new partnership will make significant strides in detecting and managing infections, helping to ensure the health and safety of New Yorkers.”Under the terms of the agreement, ILÚM will invest up to $48.6 million in the project over 5 years, and the New York State Life Sciences Initiative will commit $22.4 million. A pilot program at select facilities will be evaluated for efficiency and efficacy before the program is expanded throughout the state.Sep 24 NY governor’s office press release  CTX-M genes found in E coli isolates from US cattle, retail meat samplesA new study by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) researchers has identified and characterized Escherichia coli carrying the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) gene CTX-M in food-producing animals and animal products in the United States. The study was published in the September issue of Microbial Drug Resistance.While CTX-M-producing E coli strains have become increasingly prevalent in hospitals in the United States and around the world and have been identified in bacteria from healthy animals in several countries, there have been fewer reports of CTX-M ESBLs in bacteria from food animals and animal products in the United States. Intestinal carriage of CTX-M–producing bacteria in food-producing animals and contamination of retail meat is a concern because it may contribute to increased incidences of infections with ESBL-producing bacteria in humans.To investigate the presence of CTX-M–carrying E coli in US food animals, the researchers conducted antibiotic susceptibility tests to determine which E coli isolates from cattle, chicken breasts, ground turkey, ground beef, and pork chops collected by the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) from 2011 through 2015 were likely ESBL producers. They then performed whole-genome sequencing on the 18 phenotypically positive ESBL E coli isolates to characterize the resistome, plasmids, and resistance genes in all strains.Their analysis revealed that all of the isolates were resistant to at least three antimicrobial classes and carried various CTX-M genes, including blaCTX-M-1, blaCTX-M-14, blaCTX-M-15, blaCTX-M-27, and blaCTX-M-32. Notably, this is the first report of E coli isolates from the NARMS retail meat program carrying blaCTX-M-14 and blaCTX-M-15, the two most frequently identified CTX-M genes worldwide. In addition, conjugation testing performed on seven of the isolates showed the CTX-M genes could be transferred to other E coli strains.The authors conclude, “While the prevalence of these two successful CTX-M enzymes is low from domestic food animal sources, monitoring will continue to help determine whether this mechanism is becoming more widespread among animal and food strains of E. coli in the United States.”Sep 1 Microb Drug Resist studylast_img read more

Read More →

World Video Game Hall of Fame names 2017 finalists

first_imgThe finalists were chosen from thousands of nominations from more than 100 countries, said museum officials, who will rely on an international committee of video game scholars and journalists to select the 2017 class. The winners will be inducted May 4.“What they all have in common is their undeniable impact on the world of gaming and popular culture,” said Jon-Paul Dyson, director of The Strong’s International Center for the History of Electronic Games.”The hall of fame recognizes electronic games that have achieved icon status and geographical reach, and that have influenced game design or popular culture.The class of 2017 will be the third group to go into the young hall, joining “DOOM,” ”Grand Theft Auto III,” ”The Legend of Zelda,” ”The Oregon Trail,” ”Pac-Man,” ”Pong,” ”The Sims,” ”Sonic the Hedgehog,” ”Space Invaders,” Tetris, “World of Wardcraft,” and “Super Mario Bros.,” whose title character got his start in this year’s “Donkey Kong” entry.More about this year’s finalists, according The Strong:—”Donkey Kong” (1981): Helped to launch the career of game designer Shigeru Miyamoto and sold an estimated 132,000 arcade cabinets.—”Final Fantasy VII” (1997): The Sony Playstation’s second-most popular game introduced 3-D computer graphics and full motion video, selling more than 10 million units.—”Halo: Combat Evolved” (2001): A launch game for Microsoft’s Xbox system, the science-fiction game sold more than 6 million copies and inspired sequels, spin-offs, novels, comic books and action figures.—”Microsoft Windows Solitaire” (1991): Based on a centuries-old card game, it has been installed on more than 1 billion home computers and other machines since debuting on Windows 3.0.—”Mortal Kombat” (1992): The game’s realistic violence was debated internationally and in Congress and was a factor in the 1994 creation of the Entertainment Software Rating Board.—”Myst” (1993): The slow-paced, contemplative game harnessed early CD-ROM technology and became the best-selling computer game in the 1990s, selling 6 million copies.—”Pokemon Red and Green” (1996): Since appearing on the Nintendo Game Boy, the Pokemon phenomenon has produced more than 260 million copies of its games, 21.5 billion trading cards, more than 800 television episodes and 17 movies.—”Portal” (2007): The Game Developers Conference’s 2008 Game of the Year was the breakout hit out of the four first-person shooter games it was packaged with, recognized for game mechanics that relied on portal physics.—”Resident Evil” (1996): Among spin-offs of the survival horror game are movies that have grossed more than $1.2 billion worldwide, as well as themed restaurants and novels.—”Street Fighter II” (1991): One of the top-selling arcade games ever helped spark an arcade renaissance in the 1990s and inspired numerous sequels.—”Tomb Raider” (1996): Its female protagonist, Lara Croft, is the face of a franchise that has sold more than 58 million units worldwide, helped in part by actress Angelina Jolie’s movie portrayal.—”Wii Sports” (2006): Launched with the Nintendo Wii home video game system, its motion-control technology let gamers of any age serve a tennis ball or throw a left hook and helped push Wii console sales to more than 100 million. In this March 16, 2017 photo provided by The Strong museum, the 12 finalists for induction this year into The Strong museum’s World Video Game Hall of Fame are pictured at the museum in Rochester, New York. The finalists, from left, are: top row, “Microsoft Windows Solitaire,” “Myst,” “Mortal Kombat,” “Donkey Kong,” center, “Final Fantasy VII,” “Street Fighter II,” bottom row, ”Halo: Combat Evolved,” “Resident Evil,” “Portal,” “Pokemon Red and Green,” “Wii Sports” and “Tomb Raider.” The 2017 class will be announced May 4. (Bethany Mosher/The Strong via AP ROCHESTER, N.Y. | The World Video Game Hall of Fame’s 2017 finalists span decades and electronic platforms, from the 1981 arcade classic “Donkey Kong” that launched Mario’s plumbing career to the 2006 living room hit “Wii Sports,” that made gamers out of grandparents.The hall of fame at The Strong museum in Rochester said Tuesday that 12 video games are under consideration for induction in May. They also include: “Final Fantasy VII,” ”Halo: Combat Evolved,” ”Microsoft Windows Solitaire,” ”Mortal Kombat,” ”Myst,” ”Pokemon Red and Green,” ”Portal,” ”Resident Evil,” ”Street Fighter II” and “Tomb Raider.”last_img read more

Read More →

CMS, Pomona-Pitzer to renew their rivalry tonight

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGift Box shows no rust in San Antonio Stakes win at Santa Anita So much so that the contest between the Stags and the Sagehens is known to have NCAA Division I referees requesting to officiate the long-standing rivalry. Rich Kolan, who refs Big West and Pac-10 games, will lead tonight’s matchup, which stands to be as competitive as ever with both CMS and Pomona-Pitzer heading into the game 2-0 in Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference action. “In any year it makes for a great game,” said Sagehens coach Charles Katsiaficas, whose team is defending back-to-back conference titles. “You can throw records out the window because you know it’s going to be a heck of a game. In certain years, when both teams are competitive, it adds a little more to the game.” So far this year, both are competitive. The Sagehens (8-5, 2-0) have won five in a row and are led by Edward Wexler-Beron (16.8 points per game) and David Knowles (14.3 ppg). Pomona-Pitzer has also seen the return of last year’s SCIAC Player of the Year, Alexander Lloyd, from knee surgery. Lloyd (8.7 ppg), who has played in just three games, didn’t see any action in a victory over Caltech on Saturday because his injury flared up, but Katsiaficas is optimistic he’ll participate tonight. The Stags (8-5, 2-0) have won four of their last five games, with three of those victories coming in overtime. The latest saw CMS outlast Whittier College on Saturday, on the legs of 18 points from Emanuel Maceira. In any division. “I think it’s a one-of-a-kind rivalry,” said CMS head coach Ken Scalmanini, whose team will host Pomona-Pitzer tonight at 7:30 at Claremont McKenna college. “You see each other throughout the year on the campuses, and that adds a dimension of competitiveness. It’s in front of the whole school which team wins, so the kids get after it. There’s a lot of kids diving on the floor at a rapid pace.” Rivalries up the ante in any sport. But the one that Claremont-Mudd-Scripps and Pomona-Pitzer share – two athletic programs spread over five college campuses in a close-knit community – rivals just about any matchup you’ll find on any basketball court in Southern California. center_img Maceira leads the Stags with 14.6 points a game, while John Parsons (14.3 ppg) and Miles Taylor (13.2) are both scoring in double figures. “We’re only two games into the season, and it’s truly all about the conference,” said Scalmanini, who split last year with Pomona-Pitzer. “We have a big one (today), and we’re getting better still.” ON THE MOVE The Chaffey men’s basketball team (19-4) improved to 4-0 in the Foothill Conference with two wins last week that helped the Panthers jump from No. 17 in the state poll to No. 6. Four days after dropping No. 16 Mt. Jan Jacinto (15-8, 3-1), Chaffey raced to a 102-100 win over No. 19 San Bernardino Valley (14-9, 2-2), the favorite to win the conference this year. Then the Panthers dropped perennial conference power Antelope Valley (9-12, 2-2) in a 95-85 comeback win. Chaffey will host Victor Valley (8-13, 2-2) tonight at 7. At Mt. SAC, the women’s basketball team (23-1) dropped No. 2 Pasadena (16-3) by way of a 63-59 win on Friday. The victory still wasn’t good enough to vault the Mounties past No. 1 San Joaquin Delta (21-4), which lost to Mt. SAC earlier this season. The Mounties will play at East Los Angeles (7-14) today at 5:30 p.m. BRONCOS HONORED December proved an up-and-down month for both the men (8-5, 4-2 in California Collegiate Athletic Association) and the women (6-7, 3-3) at Cal Poly Pomona. Two of the steadier players in both programs were honored by the Broncos this week with athlete-of-the-month nods Senior Jonathan Boyd (Etiwanda High) led the men with 12.3 points per game in December. He is currently second on the team with 12.3 points per game, a number boosted by the career-best 31 points he turned in during Cal Poly’s 99-76 win over Cal State Stanislaus on Saturday. Sophomore Ashley Moody, the women’s leader with 12.4 points per game, averaged 12 points a game in December. She injured her knee in a game against Cal State Bakersfield on Jan. 7 and hasn’t played since. The Broncos could learn the results of an MRI taken Saturday as soon as today. Either way, coach Paul Thomas said she would not play this weekend, when Cal Poly plays at Cal State San Bernardino and UC San Diego. UP TO TASK Two former Upland High School basketball stars enjoyed some success in recent weeks in their respective four-year programs. Sheldon Pace (Chaffey College) dished out 17 assists to set a record for No. 7 Southwest Baptist in a 95-78 win over No. 17 Central Missouri State. Pace leads SMU (16-1) with 14.2 points and 9.1 assists per game. SMU will play Missouri Western State (10-6) on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. At Whittier, senior Brandon Robinson earned tournament MVP honors at the Purple & Gold Poet Classic January 5-6 and was named the SCIAC’s Male Athlete of the Week. Robinson (7.8 points a game on the season) had 45 points and 28 rebounds, good for two double-doubles in three games. Whittier (6-7, 0-2) will play Occidental (11-1, 2-0) tonight at 7:30. HALL MOVES ON Julie Hall, who served as Cal Poly director of development for the athletic department until December, was named the assistant athletic director of development at UC Riverside. Hall, who was at Cal Poly for two years, will be responsible for leading a major gifts fund-raising program. Jeff Sanders’ local college package runs on Wednesday. He can be reached at (909) 483-8540 or at [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Read More →