NASCAR bolsters international efforts with personnel moves

first_imgDAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (Jan. 30, 2018) – NASCAR today announced key leadership appointments across its growing international business landscape and the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series.Jim Cassidy has been named to the new leadership position of Chief International Officer, reporting into Steve O’Donnell, Executive Vice President and Chief Racing Development Officer. Charged with growing the NASCAR brand of racing internationally, Cassidy will oversee all international competition and commercial operations, building on the success of NASCAR’s three international series with the NASCAR Pinty’s Series in Canada, NASCAR PEAK Mexico Series and NASCAR Whelen Euro Series.“Jim brings nearly two decades of racing operations and industry leadership experience. He has worked tirelessly to grow our existing motorsports properties outside of the U.S and will lead our efforts to identify important growth opportunities internationally for our sport and its growing fanbase,” said O’Donnell.“NASCAR racing is broadcast in over 185 countries and territories, with race fans engaging stock car racing in person at events in Canada, Mexico and across Europe. The demand for NASCAR racing internationally has never been stronger and we look forward to bringing our sport closer to race fans everywhere,” said Cassidy.Joining Cassidy in these efforts will be Chad Seigler in the new position of Vice President, International Business Development. Seigler will draw upon a decade of successful industry sales experience to oversee all international sales and partnership marketing. Celeste Griffin-Churchill in the new position of Senior Director, International, Joe Balash in his current role as Director, International Competition, and Bob Duvall in his position as Senior Director, International & Weekly/Touring Business Development will play key roles in this area.NASCAR additionally announced that Ben Kennedy has been named to the leadership position of General Manager, NASCAR Camping World Truck Series. Kennedy will oversee all aspects of NASCAR’s popular truck series, working closely with Brad Moran, NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Managing Director, and Jeff Wohlschlaeger, Managing Director, Series Marketing to continue to deliver great racing, fan experience and marketing across this series. Kennedy will report into Elton Sawyer, Vice President, Competition and will work closely with O’Donnell and Steve Phelps, Executive Vice President and Chief Global Sales and Marketing Officer.“Ben will draw upon his years of experience across NASCAR’s grassroots and national series to bring valuable commercial and competition insights to our NASCAR Camping World Truck Series. With promising young drivers and experienced veterans battling it out in close, side-by-side racing, Ben truly understands from experience that every lap matters and we are excited about his future leadership in this important national series,” said Brent Dewar, President, NASCAR.last_img read more

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Children Want Factual Stories, Versus Fantasy, More Often Than Adults

first_imgNPR:Childhood is a time for pretend play, imaginary friends and fantastical creatures. Flying ponies reliably beat documentaries with the preschool set.Yet adults are no strangers to fiction. We love movies and novels, poems and plays. We also love television, even when it isn’t preceded by “reality.So, what happens as we make our way from childhood to adulthood? Do we ever reallyoutgrow a childlike predilection for make-believe? Or does our fascination with fiction and fantasy simply find new forms of expression?In a paper published earlier this year, psychologists Jennifer Barnes, Emily Bernstein and Paul Bloom set out to compare children’s and adults’ preferences for fact versus fiction in stories. Their results are surprising — and reveal something important about why we’re so drawn to fiction in the first place.Read the whole story: NPR More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Raw milk may pose health risk

first_imgWhat’s a building block in the food pyramid that’s important for building and maintaining bone mass? It’s milk.Whether it’s from cows, goats, sheep or another mammal, milk and milk products are an important source of calcium throughout a person’s life.advertisementadvertisement Most of the milk sold in the U.S. is pasteurized, a process during which the milk is heated to 161ºF and kept there for 15 seconds. Pasteurization kills harmful bacteria – including salmonella, E. coli and listeria – that can contaminate milk before it gets to your table.The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention recommend pasteurization for all milk consumed by people in the U.S.Pasteurization reduces illnessPasteurization of milk is an effective means of preventing outbreaks of foodborne illness, including tuberculosis, brucellosis, salmonellosis, scarlet fever and listeriosis. It was first used in the U.S. more than 100 years ago and has been widely used for more than a half-century, says John Sheehan, an FDA expert on the safety of dairy products.But increasingly, consumers are seeing “raw” milk – and cheeses, yogurts and other products made from it – in specialty shops, farmers’ markets and stores. That’s partly because many Americans have adopted a “back to nature” philosophy about the foods they eat, embracing the idea that locally produced and minimally processed foods are more nutritious.But in the case of raw milk, FDA says that’s not true. Although the heating process slightly affects a few of the vitamins – thiamine, vitamin B6 and folic acid within the B-complex, and vitamin C, the changes are not significant. Meanwhile, there is a risk that milk could be contaminated by environmental factors such as soil or animal feces, animal diseases or bacteria on an animal’s skin.advertisementConsumers are also seeing more raw milk products because of the growth of the artisan cheese industry, Sheehan says. These cheeses are made by hand using what are considered to be traditional methods – often on the farm where the milk is produced. Some of these cheesemakers use pasteurized milk in their products, but others use raw milk that could contain disease-causing bacteria.Some people believe cheese made from raw milk is better for you, but Sheehan says there is no scientific evidence to support that belief.In countries where pasteurization of milk is less common, outbreaks of foodborne illness attributed to tainted milk or milk products occur more frequently than they do in the U.S. In France, for example, the rate of foodborne illness attributed to milk and milk products was reported to be roughly three times what it is in the U.S., says Sheehan, citing a 2001 study by researcher Marie-Laure De Buyser and other French scientists.Federal lawFederal law prohibits dairies from distributing raw milk across state lines if it has been packaged for consumers. This means raw milk can only be distributed between states if it’s going to plants to be pasteurized or used to make aged cheese before being sold to consumers. Experts have long believed that aging cheese for 60 days or longer killed disease-causing bacteria. FDA is now reviewing the scientific basis for that belief. PD—Excerpts from an article posted March 8, 2011, on FDA’s Consumer Updates page.advertisementlast_img read more

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