Teachers say ‘frustration’ over decade of cuts to education is fueling nationwide revolt

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(MESA, Ariz.) — On most Mondays, Stacy Masciangelo, a teacher in Mesa, Arizona, would be in her classroom teaching 33 junior high school students computer technology with outdated equipment that sometimes takes eight minutes just to log on.But this Monday, Masciangelo will join thousands of fellow teachers at the state Capitol in Phoenix, walking a picket line for the third day of a statewide public educator strike.“We’re frustrated. It’s frustrating. How can you tell a kid education is so important when everything that our leaders do say otherwise?” Masciangelo told ABC News on Sunday.She has a bachelor’s degree in business marketing and a master’s in secondary education, but her take-home pay every two weeks comes to less than $900, and that’s not including the money she takes out of her own pocket each year to buy classroom supplies.“But it’s not about teachers being greedy. It’s not about our salaries,” she said of the strike. “Most teachers I know, they try to get by, they live paycheck to paycheck. My husband’s a teacher. He has three jobs just to try to make ends meet. But we both have a calling. We’re extremely passionate about it and we work ourselves to the bone trying to do it because it matters.”Teachers across the nation say the chronic cuts to education spending over the past decade lies at the root of a growing revolt by educators who have reached the tipping point.Arizona, Oklahoma, West Virginia, Kentucky and Colorado have all seen teacher uprisings this year. All of the states, with the exception of Colorado, are dominated by Republicans in the governors’ offices and legislatures. Three of the states — West Virginia, Oklahoma and now Arizona — have seen wildcat strikes by educators.“It’s happening in our reddest states. It’s happening where for the last 10 to a dozen years there has been an ideology of cutting taxes on mostly big businesses and the expense, of course, comes at public services like a public school,” Lily Eskelsen Garcia, president of the National Education Association, told ABC News today.“So the last time we had this horrible, horrible cut in school services was in the Great Recession 10 years ago, where we lost thousands and thousands of teachers and they laid off the school librarians and the band teachers and they said this is a crisis,” Garcia said. “Well, nobody steps up more to help their kids in a crisis than a teacher. After a hurricane … good lord, after a shooting.”Garcia said there is a correlation between teachers taking to the streets to make their demands heard, and other protests that have recently swept the country, from the Women’s March on Washington to massive student-led protests over school shootings.“This is not unpredictable. They understand the only power they have is to bring those voices together, to stand together and what they’re saying is, ‘We no longer have any faith in politicians. We have not seen that you have been doing your jobs, that you have been taking care of education, that you have been taking care of our safety, that you’ve been taking care of basic justice. And so we’ll take matters into our own hands,’” Garcia said.On Thursday, about 50,000 public school teachers in Arizona went on strike to pressure lawmakers into giving them a 20 percent pay hike, fork over a $1 billion in education funding and up the salaries of school support staff.About 10,000 teachers in Colorado took personal leave to go to the state Capitol in Denver and lobby legislators to boost funding for education there, which they say has been slashed by a whopping $6.6 billion over the last nine years. The teachers are also demanding no new corporate tax breaks until education funding is restored.The labor actions in Arizona and Colorado come after teachers in Oklahoma went on strike and won a pay raise and about a $500 million increase to education funding. Earlier this month, Kentucky educators walked out of class angry over a pension reform bill they said was passed by legislators without their input and signed into law by their governor despite their vociferous objections.The teacher revolt stated in West Virginia, where educators went on a nine-day strike and won a five percent pay hike in March.“I would say that that’s the straw that broke the camel’s back,” Masciangelo said of the West Virginia strike.Masciangelo said the public appears to be with the teachers, some even joining the picket line.“I’ve been pleasantly surprised,” she said. “It’s incredible the support we’re getting from the community itself.“Whenever I have my #RedForEd shirt on and I’m out just doing daily stuff, I’m getting stopped constantly by people saying we support you,” she added.Public educators in Arizona rank 46th in the nation in teacher pay, earning about $12,000 less than the national average of $59,660, according to a 2018 report by the National Education Association.Arizona spends about $4,500 less than the national per-pupil average of about $12,000 a year, ranking 48th in the nation, according to the NEA report.Like in other states where teachers have taken action, Arizona lawmakers appear to be getting the message.“Without a doubt, teachers are some of the biggest difference-makers in the lives of Arizona children,” Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey said in a Twitter post last week. “They need to be respected, and rewarded, for the work they do — and Arizona can do better on this front.”On Friday, he proposed granting teachers a 20 percent raise by 2020 and budgeting an additional $100 million for new textbooks, building improvements and support staff salaries. The governor proposed increasing money for education by $371 million over 5 years.“We’ve all been listening — but now, it’s time to act,” Ducey added.But teachers union officials aren’t about to call off their strike just yet.“That’s why we do know how to do our homework. We can see through all of these fake plans and unless there is a dedicated funding source, we are not going to be fooled,” Garcia, the National Education Association president, told ABC News. “We want to see the plan and it has to be something that makes sense. This is not calculus. This is adding and subtracting.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Broadway Vet Catherine Wreford Finds Freedom from Cancer in Big-Time Return to Ballet Stage

first_img View Comments  Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:49Loaded: 0.00%0:00Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently behind liveLIVERemaining Time -1:49 1xPlayback RateChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Although Wreford once took a hiatus from performing to run a mortgage company and later become a nurse, dancing is what truly fuels her passion. “To me, dance means freedom,” Wreford says. “Freedom from my cancer, freedom to put aside everything and focus on what I truly love and freedom of the melody and rhythm that pours out of my body when I dance. I feel alive and extremely lucky. I try my best to take one day at a time.” Playing Lady Capulet in the current production of Romeo and Juliet at the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, Wreford will be supported by her longtime friend and dance partner Craig Ramsay, who is taking on the role of Lord Capulet. The two first met when Ramsay got into the professional division at the very same ballet company over 20 years ago. “I was in the general division but was allowed to take a few of the men’s classes that Craig was in and we were both mentored by Arnold Spohr,” Wreford says. “We came together because of our mutual fondness of musical theater, but knew that ballet would help us be triple threats on Broadway.”And triple threats they became. Wreford made her Broadway debut at age 21 in 42nd Street and also appeared in Oklahoma! and on the road with Annie Get Your Gun. Two years later, Ramsay began his Broadway career, appearing in Fiddler on the Roof and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.Now, the duo is back together again and Wreford isn’t taking the opportunity lightly. “Growing up at the Roal Winnipeg Ballet I could never imagine that I would get the opportunity to dance in this gorgeous company,” Wreford says. “To be playing Lady Capulet with my best friend in my sixth year after diagnosis is a dream come true. I can draw from all my experiences and use them to my advantage.” Catherine Wreford and Craig Ramsay in rehearsal(Photo provided by the Royal Winnipeg Ballet) A dancer since childhood and Broadway veteran, Catherine Wreford is taking the stage once again in Royal Winnipeg Ballet’s production of Romeo and Juliet this weekend, but this time she’s six years into her journey with terminal cancer.Wreford was diagnosed with brain cancer on June 24, 2013 when her daughter, Quinn, was only five weeks old and was given two to six years to live. “I had an awake Craniotomy radiation and four kinds of chemo for over a year,” Wreford tells Broadway.com. “It was on my speech center so I had to relearn how to speak, write and what the words meant.” Through the struggles, frustration and therapy, Wreford has continued to find solace on stage. Catherine Wreford and Craig Ramsay in rehearsal(Photo provided by the Royal Winnipeg Ballet) “To be playing Lady Capulet with my best friend in my sixth year after diagnosis is a dream come true.” While every day is a new battle, Wreford has a strong support system that helps her find new strength daily. “My family gets to see me happy and not depressed even though I have this terrible cancer that will kill me sooner rather than later,” Wreford says. “They understand that I need to dance and that it keeps me positive and motivated to keep going and not give up.”Wreford and Ramsay can be seen in Romeo and Juliet at the Royal Winnipeg Ballet through February 17.Watch the heartwarming moment where Wreford is offered the role of Lady Capulet below.last_img read more

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Monsters Continue Win Streak 5-3 Over Marlies; Dalpe Scores Two

first_imgThis game recap is brought to you by our premier sponsor, “Jenny’s Old Fashioned Popcorn”.  You can visit them in person, or on line at the below link.https://www.jennyspopcorn.com/TORONTO, ON – TheCleveland Monsters defeated the Toronto Marlies, 5-3, on Monday afternoon at the Coca-Cola Coliseum. With the win, the Monsters improve to 3-0-0-0 overall and remain alone in first place of the Eastern Conference’s North Division.The Monsters struck first Monday against Toronto when Ryan MacInnis re-directed a Nathan Gerbe shot from Eric Robinsonat 3:22 of the opening frame to give Cleveland an early 1-0 lead. Moments later, off a Toronto turnover, Justin Scott extended the lead with his second goal of the season, an even-strength tally at 5:33 of the first period to put the Monsters in front, 2-0.The Marlies responded at 15:49 when Chris Mueller scored on assists from Dmytro Timashov and Sam Gagner to trim the Monsters lead to 2-1. Michael Prapavessis capped off the scoring in the opening stanza with his first professional goal, an even-strength marker at 17:25 on feeds from Paul Bittner and Dillon Simpson to extend the Cleveland lead to 3-1 after one period of play.In the second period, the Monsters pushed their lead to 5-1 thanks to two quick goals from Zac Dalpe – the first, a power-play goal at 2:13 on feeds from Alex Broadhurst and Gerbe, and the second an even-strength tally at 4:30 with assists from Tommy Cross and Robinson. Toronto answered with an even-strength goal of their own at 4:46 as Sam Gagner scored on a feed from Carl Grunstrom. The Marlies closed the scoring for the day at 17:56 of the middle frame when Calle Rosen found the back of the net thanks to assists from Jordan Subban and Gagner, giving the Monsters a 5-3 road victory.Cleveland goaltender Jean-Francois Berube stopped 37 of 40 shots faced Monday to improve to 2-0-0 on the season, while Marlies backstop Kasimir Kaskisuo stopped 19 of 24 pucks to drop to 1-1-0.Next up for the Monsters, it’s a Thursday home clash vs. the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins with full coverage, live from The Q, underway at 7:00. Related TopicsCleveland Monsters David Sprousecenter_img Co-editor, photographer covering the Cleveland Monsters, Gladiators and Indians. Also, passionate about high school sports, be sure to follow David on Twitter and Instagram @neosi_sprouse for in-game updates and up-to-the-minute developing news.last_img read more

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Latvian champions “Petrow” will be led by the head coach of…

first_imgSavincev has been leading the Belarusian national team since last year. First, changing the role of assistant to the status of the head coach, Savincevs led the team into the World Cup Elite round, against Italy (3: 3), Hungary (2: 0) and England (5: 2), winning seven points. After that, Savincev became a full-fledged head coach, but at the beginning of this year Belarus lost in all three games (1: 2 against Portugal, 3: 5 against Italy and 2: 4 against Finland) and remained in the last place in the elite subgroup, leaving the fight for road sign. In September, Belarus, led by Savincev, defeated Latvia 4: 2 in a test match in Minsk.In January, Savincev became the head coach of the Belarusian grant “Stalitsa”. Prior to that, he was an assistant, but due to family circumstances, the Russian specialist Yevgeny Osincev left the position. Two days later, “Stalitsa” played “Rēzekne” in the newly formed Baltic League (4: 0), but later “Petrow” also defeated in this tournament (7: 3). With 13 points in five matches, “Stalitsa” was the leader of the Baltic League, but the competition was stopped by the Covid-19 pandemic. At the Belarusian championship, “Stalitsa” settled for bronze, and Savincenz was replaced by another coach.In July, “Petrow”, beating Rabu 3-0 in the final series, became the Latvian champion in indoor football for the first time, but the next day the head coach Guntis Apīnis, who led the team for a season and a half, announced his resignation. In the inter-season, “Petrow” has already announced the attraction of the best new player of the championship and Salaspils student Artjomas Kozlovs, as well as the start of cooperation with the Premier League “Salaspils”. The Eurocup lottery is expected on September 2, but the games are scheduled for mid-October.During the player’s career, Savincev was named the country’s best indoor footballer four times, became the champion of Belarus six times and also earned six silver and three bronze medals.Resources used:https://www.facebook.com/petrowfc/p…last_img read more

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