Minnesota aims to cut down on turnovers

first_imgMinnesota aims to cut down on turnoversThe team has been struggling with turnovers, which has led to losses.Chelsea GortmakerGophers assistant women’s basketball coach Fred Chmiel joined Marlene Stollings’ coaching staff in late May 2014. Chmiel will coach aganist his former team, Penn State, today. Matt GreensteinJanuary 28, 2015Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintJust more than a year ago, Penn State assistant coach Fred Chmiel watched the Lady Lions trample the Gophers 83-53.Chmiel — now an assistant coach at Minnesota — will watch the two teams play again on Wednesday from the opposite sideline.“We all are here right now. We all are Gophers,” redshirt sophomore Amanda Zahui B. said jokingly.Last time the teams played, the Gophers suffered. They turned the ball over 21 times.“It definitely stings when you lose to a team by that much. We definitely want to show them up this year,” junior guard Shayne Mullaney said.Chmiel, who works primarily with guards, spent four seasons at Penn State. But this time around, he’ll try to help the Gophers cut down on costly turnovers.Mullaney said Minnesota is using Chmiel’s Penn State coaching time to its advantage.“He obviously knows their style of play. Coach Fred is in charge of our scouting reports, and he’s great at that. Obviously, we want to win extra for him because that’s where he came from,” Mullaney said.And for the Gophers to do that, they must improve their ball handling.The team has averaged just over 16 turnovers in its losses.  Mullaney has accounted for 16 of the team’s 34 turnovers in the past two games.“We had way too many turnovers last game. We need to limit our turnovers, especially me as a point guard. It makes a difference in a close game,” Mullaney said. Jack Satzinger contributed to this report The turnovers have forced the Gophers to battle back from deficits.“We just need to come out more aggressively in the first half and not dig ourselves a deep hole,” senior forward Shae Kelley said.While Mullaney has struggled with turnovers, she currently is second in the Big Ten for assists. “We’re putting her in situations where we feel she can give looks to those kids for shots,” head coach Marlene Stollings said.Stollings said Mullaney has distributed the ball well, but she wishes the team would become less selfless.“If [there is] any problem that we have, it’s telling them to shoot more instead of pass,” Stollings said. “Shayne’s performed really well for us, but she’s logging a lot of minutes. We don’t have a lot of depth, so we’re going to try to help her with that. We want her to remain very confident.”The team has dropped two consecutive games, largely due to its turnovers, but Stollings has tried to keep the team’s confidence up.“Coach has told us that we can’t dwell on [the losses] too long. It’s a marathon, not a sprint. We just need to keep everybody’s spirits up,” Kelley said.Mullaney said the team is hungry for a victory after dropping its past two games.“Everybody’s fighting for their lives this time of year. It’s a time of separation in the conference,” Stollings said.last_img read more

Read More →

Turning of the tide: Super litigation

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

Read More →

UK women’s basketball coach Matthew Mitchell speaks

first_imgPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window. The Video Cloud video was not found. Error Code: VIDEO_CLOUD_ERR_VIDEO_NOT_FOUND Session ID: 2020-09-18:24c63ab98b9a91e7afa3ab8 Player ID: videojs-brightcove-player-499660-4540125410001 OK Close Modal DialogCaption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Kentucky’s Mitchell talks about upcoming season, philosophy at UK Alumni luncheon at Louisville’s Galt House hotel.last_img read more

Read More →

BOCADILLO: ‘Bite me’ as an art form

first_img Fresh Denver peach aspic on a dollop of balsamic vinegar reduction with a nugget of dark, Colorado cherry on a pinxto board at Bocadillo in Denver’s Highlands. Fresh Boulder-market cherry tomato pinxtos with a splash of balsamic vinegar and a tiny leaf of basil on a pinxto board at Bocadillo in Denver’s Highlands. Philly cheeseteak springroll tapas. A smore’s pinxto made from a homemade graham cracker with a chocolate nugget and a toasted homemade marshmallow on a pinxto board at Bocadillo in Denver’s Highlands. If you haven’t been to Spain to find out what all the gastronomic fuss has been for the past decade or so, you don’t have to. Bocadillo’s creators and operators, Andrew Minhinnick and Derek Dietz, have brought the genius of Basque and Barcelona to the mile-high region.The art and joy of small bites has pretty much escaped Colorado up to now. Tapas and pinxtos (pronounced “peen-chose”) fronts come and go, but either the portions, the prices or the creations themselves have all been lost in the translation to Colorado’s otherwise red-hot restaurant scene.The real deal, however, hasn’t escaped Dietz’s interpretation of some of the best food ideas on the planet.For Dietz, it all starts with Colorado’s growing fervor for bringing organic, local farm foods to creative restaurant kitchens, bypassing the big food-industry purveyors and their warehouses of mediocrity. It’s not all that easy. But time spent with Boulder- and Denver-area farmers and farmer markets has got Minhinnick and Dietz getting jaw-dropping bright tomatoes and fruity beets into their north-Denver kitchen, onto wooden picks and into appreciative mouths — all within hours of these fruits and veggies having left their local stems.The fluid menu is based on fresh, top-quality ingredients dressed up to play to their strengths in sizes that make you happy, and always wanting more.This is a place where ham (real ham), bossy cheeses, coddled olives, fresh pickles, herbs, bread and subtle peppers are treated in the royal way they should be. Sunday in the tratoria-style cafe brought an attention-getting herbed goat-cheese fritter on top of Boulder-beet carpaccio and a more traditionally Basque crunchy slice of breaded eggplant under melted drunken cheese.The heavens parted and the angels sang when Dietz’s sister — responsible for the African pasta via London she snagged last week that was the foundation for a large bowl of summer-veggie ratatouille — brought to the table a small, wooden altar for Dietz’s Asian Short Ribs. The world’s most tender short rib was resting on a spoonful of steamed white rice. The rib balanced a slice of shitakki mushroom and a perfectly poached quail egg in a feat not to be tried at home. All these flavors and textures were tied together with a soy reduction of what the mushrooms had bathed in just moments before.While the star of the show here could well be Spanish ham, an especially tender and salty Serrano, Dietz is happy to expand on what the Spaniards invented with the idea of more eclectic bites and small sandwiches. His East Coast roots served him well with his interpretation of a Philly Cheesesteak Spring Roll. An astoundingly buttery foi gras found its way into a couple of places on the menu. At one point, one of Bocadillo’s little wooden slabs offered up sugar-cube-sized nuggets of peach aspic made from fruit snagged from a yard around the corner. Something faintly anisey in the jell nudged the flavor of the dark, Colorado cherry slice on top. Who knew?Aside from the manageable selection of $1-$3 bites, tapas that hover around $5 each and sandwiches (bocadillos) on perfectly crusted baguettes for about $11 each, there’s the no-charge fresh-pickle bar and an array of fresh-juice-infusions for $2 for as much and many as you want.Dietz’s girlfriend-pastry-chef offers up a changing menu of inspirations. Yesterday was a s’mores-like bite that was a homemade graham cracker under a slice of fudgy chocolate and a toasty homemade marshmallow with a dab of ganache.It was serendipity that brought Bocadillo to Colorado. Minhinnick’s Phish-friendly life crossed paths with a man who happened to have a space on Tejon Street, and that was just what Dietz needed to work his Spanish-based magic.The venue is small, which could be a problem when the place catches on even more than it already has. A blessing and a curse is the lack of liquor license so far. You can happily BYOB and end up with the perfect killer wine for one-tenth the cost of the usual drill. Colorado restaurants have an increasingly bad habit of stepping on wine so many times that it’s nearly killing the cost of a night out and making for a much less enjoyable dinner or lunch. The downside: You’ve got to remember to bring the bottle or choose from Kim’s slim selections at the friendly, blue-collar store next door.But Dietz’s eye-popping offerings beg to be enjoyed with the grape. It’s all about the vibe here. These are fun mouthfuls created and served by friends who love life and love what they do. It really is a Colorado recipe for success. An crusty eggplant crouton under melted drunken cheddar on a pinxto board at Bocadillo in Denver’s Highlands. A crusted goat-cheese ball on a roasted yellow beet. Behind, a pasta dish based on summer-veggie ratatouille.center_img It’s the perfect recipe for success.Two Philly guys lured to Colorado’s good life mix talent, skill and passion to create cool eats for people who love them. The result? Bocadillo: the newest addition to the rising cafe scene in Denver’s Highlands. An herbed goat cheese fritter atop romaine and beet carpaccio on a pinxto board at Bocadillo in Denver’s Highlands. An Asian short rib on rice with mushrooms and a poached quail egg on a pinxto board at Bocadillo in Denver’s Highlands. Bocadillo4044 Tejon St. in DenverWednesday-Sunday, noon-8 [email protected]astbiz.netfacebook.com/Bocadillodenver/ Credit cards OK. No booze. Menu changes daily.last_img read more

Read More →

Atif Aslam rocked Guyana National Stadium with exceptional performance

first_imgThe Atif Aslam concert was held on May 1 at the Guyana National Stadium, Providence, East Bank Demerara, and although days have passed, those who braved the rainy weather still have a vivid image of the heartthrob serenading thousands of his fans who flocked the arena.The show was organised by the Guyana Hindu Dharmic Sabah and the Bollywood singer definitely lived up to every expectation. Although he arrived hours before his live performance, he left and embedded mark on those who attended.The highlight of the evening is his melodious and powerful voice that echoed from afar. Singing some of his most popular tunes, the audience – especially those in the VVIP section – took the opportunity to shake the renowned artiste’s hands while those in the audience sang alone.(Photos by Javin Singh and Amanda Richards)He performed from the Bollywood genre to folk music, Qawalis and pop songs which have undoubtedly sent the audience into a frenzy. Some of his songs included “Pehli Nazar”, “Tu Jaane Na”, “Tere Sang Yaara”, “Dil Diyan Gallan”, “Tera Hone Laga Hoon” and “Main Rang Sharbaton Ka”.During his performance, the rain came down twice but patrons were well prepared with their umbrella. After performing some of his hit songs, he performed several done by others which had all sections of the audience singing along.Also during his performance, several persons were given the opportunity to go onto the stage to meet the superstar and have his autograph. One such person was a 97-year-old woman whom Aslam thanked for being one of his dedicated fans.In addition, one fan who was a part of the singer’s Washington, DC, concert followed him to Guyana where she got the chance to hug the young Pakistani singer. The show started as scheduled but at the commencement, people were still making their way into the packed arena.The show was opened with a dance routine by members of the Dharmic Nritya Sangh who made way for the young heartthrob, Vivek Mishra, who was well received by the audience. After singing a few songs, he made way for the man with the golden voice and his band.The funds garnered from the event will be used in the Dharmic Rama Krishna School Expansion project which will involve the construction of a new secondary school and additional primary facilities.The mega concert was held to commemorate the 180th anniversary of the arrival of East Indians to Guyana.last_img read more

Read More →