‘We just don’t have answers’: Mystery surrounds killing of 4 people at North Dakota business

first_imgPrathaan/iStock(MANDAN, N.D.) — A North Dakota town was devastated after four people were found mysteriously dead at a local business and police said they were searching for the suspect.A homicide investigation is underway after the bodies were found Monday morning inside RJR Maintenance & Management, a property management company in Mandan, said the Mandan Police Department.Two of the victims, employees Lois Cobb, 45, and William Cobb, 50, were married, Mandan Chief of Police Jason Ziegler said at a news conference on Tuesday. Robert Fakler, 52, the owner, and Adam Fuehrer, 42, another worker, were also among the dead.“We just don’t have answers,” Ziegler told ABC News, adding that no suspects have been identified and no one is in custody.“It’s very unusual for the state of North Dakota. I don’t think any community across this great country could ever imagine something like this happen in their backyard,” he added, calling the crime “devastating” for the community.Ziegler said police do not believe the public is in danger, but he urged the community to remain vigilant.“This was very specific to the victims that were involved,” the chief said. “There was nothing at the crime scene that would lead us it believe that anyone outside the victims involved are in any danger.”The chief called RJR Maintenance & Management a “reputable company in our area.”There were security cameras inside the building but the chief did not say if the crime was on video.No weapons were recovered, he said.Autopsies are being conducted and cause of death will be released by the medical examiner, Ziegler said.As police investigate, Ziegler said, “We’re asking for public assistance. If anyone has any information regarding this crime, please contact the Mandan police.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More →

Watch your language when talking about autism

first_imgLinkedIn Share on Facebook Words matter. The way we use them to communicate with or about others can have a huge impact on people’s lives. This is especially the case when it comes to disability. Handicapped. Retarded. Mad. Activists have campaigned hard to eradicate such terms, which are offensive and perpetuate a negative view of disabled people – one as passive, unable to take control over their own lives.Responding to this demand, recent government guidelines have encouraged clinicians and teachers to use positive and inclusive language, including the use of language that does not define people by their disability.“Person-first” language has become what’s called for: that is, calling someone a “person with autism” – describing what a person has, not what a person is. This has become the recommended way to speak with or about disability – in the press, journal articles, hospitals and schools. Email Pinterestcenter_img Share Share on Twitter It is difficult not to see the good intentions behind this approach. But perhaps it is not really as inclusive as it claims to be.Many disabled people have argued vehemently against the use of “person-first” language, instead preferring “disability-first” language, such as he or she is an “autistic person”. Nowhere is this issue more hotly debated than the field of autism. Many autistic activists argue that person-first language is dehumanising, as if they can somehow be separated from their autism, that there is a “typical” person affected by autism, rather than a person whose life is in part defined by being autistic.These are difficult questions. But it is surely not difficult to argue that truly inclusive language should be defined by the people who are actually autistic. Not by well-meaning outsiders, no matter how powerful. Take a look at the #actuallyautistic and #describingautism twitter handles to see some of these debates.Not right for everyoneRecently, together with the National Autistic Society, my colleagues and I asked 3,470 autistic people, parents and their broader support network, about the words they use to describe themselves, their children or the people with whom they work. Did they prefer to use “autistic person”? Or “person with autism”? Or “person who has autism”?The results clearly showed that people use many terms when talking about autism. The words “autism” and “on the autism spectrum” were clear favourites among all the groups added together. But there was much disagreement on the use of several words and phrases. Professionals preferred to use “person with autism” while autistic adults and family members preferred on the whole to use “is autistic”. They thought that the term allowed them to describe the centrality of autism to their lives.One autistic woman said:In describing someone who’s autistic as ‘a person with autism/person who has autism/(or worst of all) person who suffers from autism’ you imply that autism is separate from a person, and behind their autism is a ‘normal’ person.Agree to disagreeBut these preferences were not unanimous, of course. Instead, for autistic people, family members and professionals, the words they used often hinged on what people believed autism to be. Those who felt that autism is one trait of many in a person tended to prefer person-first language. Others, who felt that autism is central to their or their child’s identity, opted to use “autistic”. Others still noted the need to use different words depending on whom one is speaking to.There is no one way of describing autism on which everyone can agree. There never will be. In order to answer who the question of who gets to decide which terms should be used, first, everyone connected to autism needs to come to accept the fact of disagreement and to respond to it with openness, flexibility and tolerance of divergence of opinion. We should always seek to establish how people wish to be described – by asking them directly, if possible – and not impose external views or guidelines upon them.Perhaps even more importantly, we need to create the conditions for debate and conversation between all of the people who are touched by autism and work in the field. It is, after all, only when we listen to each other that we discover what individual words are taken to mean and why they often matter so much.By Liz Pellicano, UCL Institute of EducationLiz Pellicano is Reader in Developmental Cognitive Science at UCL Institute of Education.This article was originally published on The Conversation.Read the original article.last_img read more

Read More →

EU funds Napoli – Bari upgrade

first_imgITALY: The European Commission has approved the allocation of €124m from the European Regional Development Fund to support upgrading of 16·5 km of the Napoli – Bari route between Cancello and Frasso Telesino.This includes double-tracking to provide an increase in speed and capacity, the construction of stations at Valle Maddaloni and Frasso Telesino/Dugenta and the provision of a connection to enable freight trains to be directly routed to the Maddaloni Marcianise yard without impacting other services.‘This EU project will give a boost to local economies in Napoli, Caserta, Benevento, Foggia and Bari, with shorter travel time for inhabitants and tourists’, said Transport Commissioner Violeta Bulc on October 8. ‘In the long run, this railway line, and the many others built with EU funding in southern Italy, will contribute to better quality of air in the region.’last_img read more

Read More →

Teenage Driver Arrested after Crashing Car Whilst 6 Times over the Drink Limit

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInPOLICE from Dumfries reported that a 19 year old man was arrested in the early hours of this morning following a crash and found to be almost 6 times over the drink driving limit.He was arrested and a report will be submitted to the procurator fiscal.A police Spokesperson gave this mesage “Drink and drug driving remains completely unacceptable and those caught face an automatic driving ban. We are determined to keep our roads safe, so if you have any information about drink or drug drivers make sure you pass it to Police Scotland by phoning 101”last_img read more

Read More →

12-year-old girl dies after being run over by father in boating accident, police say

first_img Related Google(BRIDGEWATER, N.H.) — A 12-year-old girl was killed after being run over by a power boat piloted by her father, according to the New Hampshire State Police Marine Patrol.Zoe Anderson was learning to water ski this morning on Newfound Lake in Bridgewater, New Hampshire, when she fell, police said in a press release. Her father, Sherwood Anderson, was steering the boat back toward where she had fallen when “his attention was momentarily distracted as his hat was blown from his head,” according to police.Sherwood Anderson put the boat into neutral but it passed over Zoe at a slow speed, causing serious injuries to her torso, police said.Police said the family is from Highland Ranch, Colorado, and the girl’s mother, Tonya Anderson, and her 14-year-old sister were also on board the boat at the time of the accident.Her family immediately brought Zoe to shore and first responders attempted to revive her with CPR but were unsuccessful, according to police.The incident remains under investigation, and New Hampshire State Police are asking anyone with information related to the accident to contact Sgt. Joshua Dirth at 603-293-2037.The Bridgewater Police Department and New Hampshire State Police Marine Patrol did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.Powered by WPeMaticolast_img read more

Read More →