Newspaper frustrated at Wolves transfer – Feel player was ‘undervalued’, should…

first_imgUnceremoniously yanked from training during pre season and returned to Italy in order to complete a move to Wolverhampton, Patrick Cutrone didn’t seem best pleased about his situation. At Milan since he was a kid, the striker’s departure hasn’t exactly been well received in Italy, especially when they see who he will be replaced with.While not official yet, his move to Molineux should be done soon for a fee of €18m + €4m, while the Serie A side will welcome Rafael Leao from Lille for over €30m.Corriere dello Sport on Tuesday are a bit perplexed by this swap, especially at the amount Cutrone was allowed to leave for.Embed from Getty ImagesThey feel the Italy international was worth at least €25m, especially when you look at what he has achieved compared to his replacement.Perhaps more versatile, Leao only has six months of regular professional football under his belt, and while he did well, there’s a feeling he remains more unproven than Cutrone.All in all, they see this as a poor piece of business for Milan, meaning a great one for Wolves, and it will now be up to the players to prove everyone wrong.After all, if Cutrone struggles in England and Leao sets Serie A alight in the coming months, the mood will change very quickly indeed.last_img read more

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Five things from the Premier League

first_imgHere, AFP Sport looks at five talking points from Sunday’s action in the Premier League:Alexander-Arnold’s auctionTrent Alexander-Arnold’s Black Lives Matter boots. POOL/AFP/Shaun BotterillLiverpool right-back Trent Alexander-Arnold showed his support of Black Lives Matter by wearing boots with the movement’s name printed on them.The pair will be auctioned with profits going to the Nelson Mandela Foundation, according to broadcaster Sky Sports.Forgetful ManeSadio Mane takes a knee to prior to kick-off despite originally forgetting to do so. POOL/AFP/Jon SuperAs was the case throughout the Premier League this weekend, each match was proceeded with players taking a knee but Liverpool attacker Sadio Mano seemed to forget to do so.As the referee blew to kick off, Mane sprinted off the halfway line to start the game with the remaining 21 players on the field dropping to the ground.The former Southampton forward then stopped running before turning back to join in with his team-mates and opponents.Giroud’s Werner warningOlivier Giroud joined Chelsea from Arsenal in January 2018. POOL/AFP/Catherine IvillWorld Cup winner Giroud scored the winner as Chelsea moved five points clear of fifth-placed Manchester United with a 2-1 victory over Aston Villa.Earlier this week, Frank Lampard’s side announced RB Leipzig forward Werner will head to Stamford Bridge over the summer to challenge France’s Giroud for a starting spot.Giroud scored his third goal in four games, continuing his form from before the coronavirus break.If he keeps it up, he will put his hand to up to compete with the Germany striker who cost the Blues a reported 60 million euros ($67 million).Joelinton joyJoelinton (L) celebrated his first home Newcastle goal with Jamaal Lascelles and Miguel Almiron. POOL/AFP/LAURENCE GRIFFITHSBrazilian forward Joelinton joined Newcastle last July for a club record fee of 44 million euros ($49 million) having scored 11 goals and claimed nine assists for Hoffenheim, but had to wait until Sunday for his first goal at St James’ Park.The 23-year-old would have hoped to mark the moment in front of a packed Gallowgate End but was forced to celebrate just with his teammates at an almost empty ground.He placed the ball under his shirt and sucked his thumb, suggesting he had more than just breaking his home goal duck to celebrate.Spraying St James’Officials spray disinfectant at St James’ Park. POOL/AFP/LAURENCE GRIFFITHSStrict health regulations have been put in place at all English top-flight grounds since the campaign restarted last week and on Sunday cleaners appeared in full suits to disinfect St James’ Park.Staff in the white all-in-one outfits sprayed cleaning product on the ground, advertising boards and in the stands of the 52,000 capacity ground before and during the game.last_img read more

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Study: Kids are less fit than their parents were

first_imgDALLAS | Today’s kids can’t keep up with their parents. An analysis of studies on millions of children around the world finds they don’t run as fast or as far as their parents did when they were young.On average, it takes children 90 seconds longer to run a mile than their counterparts did 30 years ago. Heart-related fitness has declined 5 percent per decade since 1975 for children ages 9 to 17.FILE – In this May 13, 2007 file photo, boys participate in 100 meter race during two-day World Athletics Day meet in Bangalore, India. An analysis of studies on 250 million children around the world finds they don’t run as fast or as far as their parents did when they were young. Research featured at the American Heart Association’s annual conference on Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013, showed that on average, children 9 to 17 take 90 seconds longer to run a mile than their counterparts did 30 years ago. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi, File)The American Heart Association, whose conference featured the research on Tuesday, says it’s the first to show that children’s fitness has declined worldwide over the last three decades.“It makes sense. We have kids that are less active than before,” said Dr. Stephen Daniels, a University of Colorado pediatrician and spokesman for the heart association.Health experts recommend that children 6 and older get 60 minutes of moderately vigorous activity accumulated over a day. Only one-third of American kids do now.“Kids aren’t getting enough opportunities to build up that activity over the course of the day,” Daniels said. “Many schools, for economic reasons, don’t have any physical education at all. Some rely on recess” to provide exercise.Sam Kass, a White House chef and head of first lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move program, stressed the role of schools in a speech to the conference on Monday.“We are currently facing the most sedentary generation of children in our history,” Kass said.The new study was led by Grant Tomkinson, an exercise physiologist at the University of South Australia. Researchers analyzed 50 studies on running fitness — a key measure of cardiovascular health and endurance — involving 25 million children ages 9 to 17 in 28 countries from 1964 to 2010.The studies measured how far children could run in 5 to 15 minutes and how quickly they ran a certain distance, ranging from half a mile to two miles. Today’s kids are about 15 percent less fit than their parents were, researchers concluded.“The changes are very similar for boys and girls and also for various ages,” but differed by geographic region, Tomkinson said.The decline in fitness seems to be leveling off in Europe, Australia and New Zealand, and perhaps in the last few years in North America. However, it continues to fall in China, and Japan never had much falloff — fitness has remained fairly consistent there. About 20 million of the 25 million children in the studies were from Asia.In China, annual fitness test data show the country’s students are getting slower and fatter over the past couple of decades.Experts and educators blame an obsession with academic testing scores for China’s competitive college admissions as well as a proliferation of indoor entertainment options like gaming and web surfing for the decline.China’s Education Ministry data show that in 2010 male college students ran 1,000 meters 14 to 15 seconds slower on average than male students who ran a decade earlier. Female students slowed by about 12 seconds in running 800 meters.Tomkinson and Daniels said obesity likely plays a role, since it makes it harder to run or do any aerobic exercise. Too much time watching television and playing video games and unsafe neighborhoods with not enough options for outdoor play also may play a role, they said.Other research discussed global declines in activity.Fitness is “pretty poor in adults and even worse in young people,” especially in the United States and eastern Europe, said Dr. Ulf Ekelund of the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences in Oslo, Norway.World Health Organization numbers suggest that 80 percent of young people globally may not be getting enough exercise.___Online:Healthy lifestyle guidelines: https://bit.ly/16ZnV7e___Marilynn Marchione can be followed at https://twitter.com/MMarchioneAPlast_img read more

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