Walsh to run again for NDP in Chatham-Kent-Leamington

first_imgThe New Democratic contender for Chatham-Kent-Leamington last time around is taking another run in the federal election this fall.Tony Walsh, an investment specialist with CIBC in Chatham, was acclaimed as the party’s candidate on Monday.“We’re just feeling increasingly uncertain and insecure,” he said beforehand, adding that health care, housing and good-paying jobs are at the top of people’s minds. “It simply comes down to knowing that our kids will have every chance they can to succeed.”He said the environment is another priority, noting the ongoing fires in the Amazon rainforest are highlighting the importance and fragility of the world’s natural resources.“Climate change is a very real thing, and we need to do more,” he said. “We can’t just talk about doing something. We actually need a plan that is going to make a difference.”Walsh finished third in the riding with 9,549 votes in 2015, when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberals won a majority government.Conservative MP Dave Van Kesteren retained his seat with 21,677 votes, while Liberal candidate Katie Omstead finished in a close second with 19,351 votes.Van Kesteren is not seeking re-election this term. Running in his place is Leamington farmer Dave Epp, who won the Conservative nomination for the riding.Omstead, a teacher, has received the nod again for the Liberals. Mark Vercouteren, who has been involved in the agricultural sector, will run again for the Greens.Walsh, 43, is a father of three and called his children his biggest motivation to try to affect change.“There was a desire for change last time around as well,” he said. “At a national level, we had a change in government, and I think a lot of constituents were hoping they would see a different leadership style, a different approach to leading the country. They’re not seeing that, certainly with the recent SNC-Lavalin scandal and coverup. They see it as the same old.”The expected date for the federal election is Oct. 21.When asked about his party’s chances with no incumbent running in the riding, Walsh said it’s difficult to say.“A lot can happen between now and then,” he said, “but those folks that wanted change. It’s clear that there’s only one option here in Chatham-Kent-Leamington, and it’s a vote for a New Democratic government.“Obviously, we’re going to have folks that stick to their colour, stick to their party, but they might be fed up.”[email protected] Twitter.com/DailyNewsTTlast_img read more

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Dramatic tail view video of an A380 landing during storm

first_imgAirlineRatings.com has captured a dramatic tail view video of an Emirates’ A380 landing during a storm at Perth International Airport.The landing was on Friday, July 19 at 6 pm while a major cold front was passing through.SEE Striking pictures of BOAC 747 and the famous Red Arrows in-flight.The Swiss captain did a superb job of pointing the nose of the A380 into the direction of the wind which can be clearly seen in the video taken on a handheld iPhone of the aircraft’s entertainment system.Also on show is Perth Airport’s $36 million high-intensity lighting system which clearly outlines the approach and runway.That landing system is a CAT111B which is normally used for landings in fog, but the high-intensity lighting is also used on stormy nights.READ: Airbus reveals Bird of Prey concept plane.Where a pilot faces a crosswind landing they need to point the aircraft in the direction of the wind while maintaining a straight course toward the runway.This is called crabbing or yawing.In strong crosswinds, the pilot may also dip the wing – sideslip – into the direction of the wind.Just before touchdown pilots apply rudder to bring the plane – and its undercarriage – back so it is aligned straight down the centre line of the runway.Here it can be seen that the captain of the A380 straightens up just before touch down for a perfect landing.At the time the winds were reported as gusting up to 40kts (74km/hour) from the west/south/west.last_img read more

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The Increasing Demand for Flexible Work Arrangements

first_imgWorkplace learning, customized workflex, mentorship, a positive work culture, and employee-based innovation are just a few of the exciting workforce trends becoming a reality for employees.  Learn more about the 2018 When Work Works (WWW) Award winners here. When I attended a meeting recently at an offsite location, the office suite was an aesthetic experience in itself. I was lucky to get a quick office tour after the meeting ended and I couldn’t help but appreciate everything I saw— from the wall art to the spacious kitchen area, the plants, the workstations, and the scenic views from the large conference rooms. In one word, it was spectacular! However, I noticed that the office was almost empty. Out of curiosity, I asked where everyone was, and I learned that most of the employees either telecommute or have customized work hours.One of the HR predictions of workplace changes for 2018 was an increased demand for flexible work arrangements. The 2018 Mercer Global Talent Trends study identified five top talent trends: Change at Speed, Working with Purpose, Permanent Flexibility, Platform for Talent, and Digital from the Inside Out.Mercer’s survey involved over 5,000 employees, 1,800 HR professionals, 800 business executives and 50 board directors from 44 countries and 21 industries. Based on this study, 51 percent of all employees want their companies to offer more flexible work options. Employees want work arrangements that give them control over their personal and professional lives.In my experience, I know that executives raise concerns about the empty offices we find these days. However, I have also learned that the increased demand for flexible work options is causing business leaders to shift their focus from where, how, or when work is done to a focus on performance and output.With this shift to work flexibility, HR professionals are undoubtedly tasked with the responsibility of implementing or redesigning policies that support flexible work arrangements for employees, are equitable, and ensure that performance goals are met.What are you doing to provide more flexibility for your employees? Please join me on December 12 at 3:00 p.m. ET for a #Nextchat on creating an award-winning workflex program for your organization.  Stay tuned to the SHRM blog for the preview!last_img read more

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Web 2.0 Conference: Ad Models: A New Approach to Marketing?

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#conferences#web#Web 2.0 Conference 2005 Related Posts Real-time blogging going on here… Jeff Jarvis, President & Creative Director, Advance.netDick Costolo, CEO, FeedburnerMatt Cutts, Software Engineer, GoogleChas Edwards, Vice President, Sales & Market Development, Federated Media PublishingBrian McAndrews, President and CEO, aQuantiveMark Pincus, Founder, tribe.netTime: 11:15am – 12:30pmpowerpoint about Distributed advertisingIntro by Jeff, then all the panelists introduced themselves.  “Ads can be a service” (Mark Cutts, Google)A media person: Online space –> metrics coming along nicely; other mediaspaces like what they see –> expectation of same metrics as online for otherforms of media. Metrics is getting much more sophisticated.–> engagement: not eyeballs; how *deep* or how related or how interested wasconsumer/user in an ad; how to measure engagement (for tv 2.0, video 2.0 etc)Brian: experiment; easy to do in small pieces; targeted; brandedadvertisement big online nowChas: tech issues can be solved relatively easy; hard qst is gettingmarketers comfortable; look at blogs that are doing things in media business,online, really well; higher loyalty than on tv etc; find publications that havetremendous audience affinities (turns out they’re blogs)Mark: CPA; b2b marketer can get to highly sophisticated, targeted marketsnow; whether its Google Adsense on an open one, marketers should be able toidentify key blogs etcMatt: experimentation is key; variety (of ads, how they’re presented) makes adifference; allowing experimentation from publishers (e.g. bidding on adwords)Mark: qst to Matt –> when will google open up the ad network (experiment)Matt: it’s definitely a priority; talks about resourcing; “freedom totinker”Jeff: serving up 4 times as much RSS as html; how to get money out of rss?Dick: “we think we’re fixing that”; circulation; rss asdifferentiated from the site –> rss feed users express explicit interest inthe content site. eg a Mac site gets a very effective CPM on site, but in feed avery low CPM –> what will work for that audience is an ad for a Mac expo.Jeff: all about relevanceFred Wilson: reed’s law (prof at MIT) –> each node becomes/forms its ownnetworkDick –> feeds into sell-side advertising a little bit. in a CPA world;other publishers can take that ad and use it. eg original advertiser gets a cut3-4 rungs down the chain.Ross Mayfield: cost per influence; social incentives for advertising arefucked up. “buyers will love this crap.”Jeff: publisher can take over the creative (eg Dell stuff he blogged about)Audience qst: u can’t let users create a brand (skeptical of value)Jeff: brand is the trust.Brian: buy-side data is very powerful info –> publisher doesn’t have thatJeff: why not open source that?Brian: in CPM world, he’s not going to let publishers know what kind of valueit’s being created… takes a crack at Apple market share as opposed to dell.qst: user be more participatory; predictive analysis; how to give users anincentive?Jeff et all: trust, transparency Dick: advertising networks have to provide more value to publishers; egaggregate stats that are valuable for everyoneFred: privacy; real world thinks its creepyMatt (google): opt-in eg to personalized search; different experimentationand networks (not just google); competition important (but he takes a swipe atYahoo ads). If someone comes along and makes a better product than googleadsense, that makes a better world. talks about ning.com and trying newsolutions [experimentation is a big word in this workshop]Brian: re relevance, onus on industry to educate people; next phase is brandphase and that’s going to be more difficult.Dick: re relevancy, it’s hadr to separate out nefarious uses of such atechnology; long time before it’s introduced into rss (whether they want to handover their ‘attention’); eg amazon treasure box –> very scary thing for mostpeople (how’d they know it was me); opting in.Matt: adsense criticals: 1) network effect; 2) relevancy; 3) target theinterest, not the user. value in serendipity. control to user (eg amazon opt outof interests)qst: how to serve up ads that user doesn’t know they’re interested in?Matt: networks; ton of room left for experimenting; lot of niches waiting tobe exploredBrian: work to find better ways to measure brand.qst: rich media adsDick: ads as content. eg podcast from digital photography company. eg bmwfilm stuff was first gen of that.Lots of talk about video, tv, product placements.qst: sponsorships around content vs advertisingMatt: eg lifehacker has a lot of commonality; disclosure really important(money is involved here, etc). lifehacker a good eg.That’s about it for this post. Will do other workshops and stuff over thenext few days. Also have written notes to type and publish when I get time. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… richard macmanus 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Facebook Unveils Ad Strategy – Users Become Marketers

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Business pages – Businesses can build profile pages on Facebook that users can interact with. I’m not sure what the benefit is here over the Facebook sponsored groups that businesses have been paying large fees to have for months. 100,000 business pages supposedly launched today, though.Social Ads and Beacon – Ads targeted by user profile data — everything from favorite music to relationship status, and the ability for people to publish product interactions from third-party sites to their news feed (Beacon works more or less as rumored).Insight – Marketing and usage metrics for advertisers about who is clicking on their ads and how to better target them.Obviously the most compelling part of what Facebook announced is Social Ads and Beacon, both of which operate in basically the ways we have been expecting. The reactions across the blogosophere have ranged from lauditory, to fearful, to bored.There are those who agree with Zuckerberg that Facebook’s new strategy is a winner — highly targeted ads and consumers acting as marketers. There are those who think the whole idea reeks of privacy violations — ads based on the personal information about yourself you intended only to share with friends? There are those who were hoping for something bigger — the next AdSense. There are those who wonder if the whole thing will work — who wants to promote products anyway?On that last point, the answer is probably a whole lot of people. While people are unlikely to trumpet prewritten marketing messages to their friends, we already do a lot of marketing in our lives. We wear t-shirts with logos on them, we talk to our friends about things we’ve purchased, and directly on Facebook we provide numerous lists of our favorite things (music, TV shows, movies, books, sports teams — we’re acting as marketers for all of those things). It’s not quite a big leap to suspect that people might want to interact with their favorite brands on a more personal level and share those interactions with their friends. In some respects, that’s already been happening on Facebook for a long time — the Apple Students group, for example, has over 420,000 users participating in one giant commerical. josh catone 1 Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting There are certainly some legitimate privacy concerns, but I’m not sure ad targeting based on explicit data is much different than targeting based on implicit data (i.e., data you knowingly enter vs. data gathered based on the things you look at or interact with). Further, I’m not sure how Facebook ads based on your list of favorite bands are much different than ads targeted by the Google search you made for a medical condition. Both could theoretically be tied to you (though in each case the company serving the ads promises they aren’t) and both are based on potentially private information that you may only want a select group of people to know about. Would there have been any privacy concerns voiced if contextual text ads (like Microsoft’s adCenter product) were being used on Facebook — essentially doing the same thing and targetting ads based on keywords you’d entered into you profile? I tend to doubt it.ConclusionIn all, I suspect that if Facebook provides opt-out tools on par with the ones they provide for the news and mini feeds and if the ads themselves aren’t too annoying, there won’t be much of a backlash from users over these ads. I was among the early Facebook users who was uncomfortable when the news feed first debuted. In time, most users adjusted and now rely on it to keep in the loop with their friends. In my personal view, ads served by a robot scanning my profile for keywords is less invasive than a news ticker that displays my every move to all my contacts. If Facebook users can get used to that, I don’t think they’ll have much trouble accepting this. But what do you think? Leave your thoughts about Facebook Ads in the comments below. At long last, Facebook today finally unveiled its much hyped advertising strategy at an invite-only event in New York. Their three pronged attack has already been reported on ad nauseum, so beyond a quick overview, I won’t get into the reporting side much.The company’s approach to advertising boils down to an attempt at conversational marketing, where users become product promoters and are encouraged to spread the word about things they buy and use among their group of friends and contacts. “Facebook Ads represent a completely new way of advertising online,” said Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to a small crowd of a few hundred ad execs and press, with his usual Jobsian hyperbole in full effect. “For the last hundred years media has been pushed out to people, but now marketers are going to be a part of the conversation. And they‚Äôre going to do this by using the social graph in the same way our users do.”Facebook’s ad strategy has three main components:center_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#news#web last_img read more

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ReadWriteWeb Integrates FriendFeed Into Our Comments

first_img2008 has seen a big change in the way the blogging community communicates with each other. In a nutshell, discussions have become very fragmented. There are two main reasons for this: firstly Twitter and its 140 character soundbites has become very popular among bloggers, and secondly FriendFeed has tipped as the lifestreaming aggregator of choice for many people. The upshot is that there are now many places where people can have online discussions. This has been a challenge to blog publishers, for whom comments are an integral part of the blogging experience.Over the past few months, the ReadWriteWeb team has been discussing internally how to adapt to this. We’ve discussed whether to use services such as Disqus, YackTrack and SezWho, which enable people to track, organize and rate blog comments. However our conclusion was that those types of apps are unsuitable for a large multi-author blog like ReadWriteWeb – there are question marks over ability to handle the load, what happens if the service goes down, SEO, and other issues. And to be frank, personally I haven’t found the user experience of any of those apps to be very compelling (we’ve tested one of them on RWW before).FriendFeed CommentsSo we got to discussing how to utilize FriendFeed and/or Twitter in ReadWriteWeb. To make a long story short, ReadWriteWeb recently implemented a new Movable Type plug-in called FriendFeed Comments. The plug-in was developed by Mark Carey and it enables FriendFeed comments to show up on ReadWriteWeb posts as comments – and vice versa! Note that there is a similar WordPress plug-in, developed by Glenn Slaven.Full disclosure, Mark Carey is a Technical Consultant for ReadWriteWeb. But he also runs his own business, which includes developing Movable Type plug-ins. So ReadWriteWeb was the first blog to test FriendFeed Comments out. As Mark explains, it “enables you to import and display comments made using FriendFeed on your entries. You can also use the plugin to enable your blog commenter to “Cc.” their comments to FriendFeed (if they have a FriendFeed account).”Here is an illustration of how it works:People commenting in FriendFeed about our post profiling Identi.caThe FriendFeed comments show up on the RWW postTo send comments from RWW into FriendFeed, simply click the ‘cc’ linkWhat I love about the MT and WordPress FriendFeed plug-ins is that they recognize the fact that conversations are occurring elsewhere, but they bring the discussion back to the source of the content where relevant. It’s win-win as far as I can see. And Now Please Fix Trackbacks…Six Apart’s David Recorden implied in a post that the FriendFeed plug-in operates in a similar way to Trackback [update: David clarifies in a comment that he didn’t mean from a technical perspective, “but rather that the idea of bridging conversations around the web is very similar.”].On that point, RWW has had a lot of issues with trackback. During our discussions internally about the plug-in, we also considered if it could somehow be adapted to replace or augment trackbacks. Because frankly trackbacks don’t work for us. We are one of the most linked-to blogs in the world, yet we get just a trickle of trackbacks. So if there is a way to integrate link-backs into ReadWriteWeb as easily as the FriendFeed plug-in integrates outside discussion, then I’d be one very happy publisher! Consider that a challenge to the plug-in developers out there 😉What are your thoughts on the state of distrubuted discussions in the blogosphere? And how can we give trackback the same makeover that blog comments has gotten in 2008? Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… richard macmanus A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#Features#Product Reviews#web last_img read more

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Cutting Congestion in Our Smart Cities

first_imgThis is the third installment (#3 of 4) of the – Smart Cities Tech Innovation SeriesClick here to view: blog #4To view more posts within the series click here: Smart Cities SeriesOne of the most visible results of a growing urban population is an increased congestion of traffic jams.  This affects not just our ability to go about our business, but also the quality of air that we breathe.  In my next post in this blog series, I will discuss Intel’s work to help improve air quality.  Today, I’d like to focus on smart transport.More than half of the world’s population lives in cities, and the number is growing.  It’s predicted that by 2025, 37 so-called megacities around the world will have a population of more than 10 million. As the number of city dwellers continues to rise, so does the number of vehicles.  It is this reason that congestion is becoming a bigger issue in our cities that are ill-prepared for such volume growth.  For example, the journey to work can now last hours – in Sao Paolo some commuters are resorting to helicopters to get around!Cities are beginning to take action to tackle this growing congestion problem.  With the ever-evolving innovations in technology, new opportunities and solutions are presented all the time. For instance, by combining existing infrastructure with smart sensors and Intel® Gateway Solutions for the Internet of Things (IoT), a city’s roadway system can be completely transformed – traffic control centers can gather useful data and get a view of how the whole transport system is working in order to improve efficiency.While traffic jams can cause inconveniences for everyday commuters, it can also cause critical delays for emergency response teams.  Intel is working with city partners to develop an end-to-end smart transport system that uses real-time data to calculate the fastest route for emergency services.  Through this system, vehicle-to-vehicle communications can be connected to sensors that monitor congestion levels.  With this integration, alert messages can be triggered to update a central management system. The “Intel Freeway to the Future” survey found that, if a smart transport system such as this was built, 59% of Americans would opt-in to a city program to have a sensor fitted in their car.Planning sustainable traffic systems is an important part of the long-term initiatives Intel has developed within cities like San Jose, California. By bringing together the technological building blocks that make up the Internet of Things, Intel is helping the city improve infrastructure.  The aim in the next 40 years is to reduce the total miles travelled in the city by 40 percent while creating 25,000 new clean-tech jobs. This project has been recognized by the White House as an integral part of the Smart America initiative.  Other public-private collaborations involving smart cities and Intel – like the ongoing project in Dublin, Ireland – have also been noticed.There are countless potential applications for this technology that can enhance the lives of city people.  One possibility could include an intelligent routing system for school buses so that parents can track the bus to ensure that their kids are traveling safely and on schedule.  Other opportunities exist within the idea of building a smart transport system that connects different services.  Suppose a ferry is running late, this smart transport system could alert local buses to arrive later for a smooth travelling connection.For those of us who can’t afford helicopter rides to and from work, Intel’s smart city initiatives are driving sustainable, effective solutions to meet the challenges of rising congestion levels in the city.To continue the conversation, let’s connect on Twitter @DawnOlsenOpens in a new windowDawn OlsenGlobal Sales DirectorGovernment Enterprise, IntelThis is the third installment (#3 of 4) of the – Smart Cities Tech Innovation Series.Click here to view: blog #4To view more posts within the series click here: Smart Cities Serieslast_img read more

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IPL 2015 Venues: Sardar Patel stadium, Ahmedabad

first_imgThe Sardar Patel stadium, located in Ahmedabad, is one of the 12 IPL venues this seasonThe stadium was built on the land donated by the Province of Bombay to the Cricket Club of Ahmedabad(CCA) in the early 1950s. The stadium holds the honor of hosting the first ever One-Day International(ODI) match played in India and is also the home ground to IPL franchise Rajasthan Royals.With a capacity of around 54,000 spectators, the entire roof of the huge stadium is designed to be supported on only one point, a unique cantilever, pillar-less stadium – the very first of its kind in India.The stadium witnessed Sunil Gavaskar’s feat of 10,000 runs against Pakistan in 1986. In 1993, Kapil Dev claimed his 432nd victim break Richard Hadlee’s record of leading wicket-taker in Tests at the same ground.Total T20Is Hosted: 1First T20I: India vs Pakistan on December 28, 2012.Highest Total(T20Is): India’s 192/5 against India on December 28, 2012.Lowest Total(T20Is): Pakistan’s 181/7 against India on December 28, 2012.Best Bowling figures: Pakistan seamer Umar Gul’s 4/37 against India on December 28, 2012.last_img read more

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The 6 things you must know about the science of persuasion

first_imgIf you have never read the classic book Influence by Robert Cialdini, you really should. But you’re also in luck, because the Influence at Work team just released this summary of the six principles of persuasion that the book covers. Spend 11 minutes watching this video – it’s well worth your time.Trouble viewing the video? Go here.No time to watch? Here’s my summary of the principles and how they apply to us.1. Reciprocity – People tend to return a favor, thus all those annoying address labels charities send out as a fundraising ploy.2. Scarcity – Perceived scarcity fuels demand. “Only four memberships are left” prompts action!3. Authority – People will tend to obey authority figures. What expert can attest to the value of your organization?4. Consistency – If people commit to an idea or goal, they are more likely to follow through. It’s why pledging is a great option for people who aren’t ready to take action.5. Liking – People are easily persuaded by other people whom they like. That’s why you want your champions spreading the word about your cause among their friends and family.6. Consensus – People will do what other people are doing. That’s why it’s great to show who is taking action for your cause – others are likely to conform.last_img read more

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Use Your Newsletters to Keep Donors Loyal, Focused, and Giving

first_imgFollow these steps to strengthen your relationship with donors and increase retention rates. In my next post on this topic, I’ll share some key strategies for creating email newsletters that won’t immediately see the delete button.With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build the strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org. You’ve seen it happen: When we stop putting energy into relationships with family and friends—relying on past interactions to hold us together—those relationships tend to fall apart. Like your college roommate or that work friend from your first job.Relationships with organization’s donors require the same kind of focus and energy for the duration—if you want to keep them happy, involved, and giving.Unfortunately, recent research suggests that most fundraisers are doing a poor job of maintaining connections, with donor retention rates at an all-time low of 39%. That means your organization could be cut from the give-to list at any point.But there is a proven approach to stopping this fatal attrition—placing hyperfocus on relationships with existing donors to keep them close. That’s mammoth potential, and your donor newsletter is a vital tool for bringing it to life.Here’s how to put your newsletter into play:1. Share, don’t ask.The primary goal of both print and e-newsletters is to reshape your donor relationships from transactional to one that’s more personal, productive, and long term—the big three of donor retention.The only way to get there is to get beyond the ask. After your prompt thanks to a donor for her first gift, you want to invite her further into your organization. Make her feel acknowledged, appreciated, and right at home, just as you would the first time you invite a new friend into your home.In much the same way, your newsletter invites donors in to experience your organization’s (and community’s) personality, promises, and values in a rich, close way.2. Connect your content and your people.Think of your newsletters as opportunities to visit with a donor. Your print newsletter (vital if your donor base skews heavily toward older supporters) is like a rich, immersive visit where you have the opportunity to get into deep conversation. (In many cases, an occasional print newsletter can actually help your organization stand out.) On the other hand, your e-news is more like a quick drop-in.Stories form the core of your newsletter. Prioritize the elements donors focus on most: photos, headlines, photo captions, and articles. Here’s where you show what your donors’ gifts have accomplished and tell how much you appreciate them.Send this version of yournewsletter in both formats only to active and recent donors so your voice stays clear and focused.3. Keep it all about donors—with an imaginary editorial board.It’s tough to remember that your organization is just one small part of your donors’ lives, especially when you live your job. But consider your personal donations—how often do you think about the organizations you support?Keep your donors front and center with an imaginary editorial board composed of personas (aka profiles: how-tos here) representing up to nine of your most important donor segments.Then, get to know your editorial board members by surrounding your desk with these profiles, and keep them in front of you while you write. It sounds hokey, but it works!4. Make it easy to recognize and remember.Using a different mix of written and graphic content, and sometimes even different layouts, for every issue is the most common error in print newsletter production. Ugh!Although this “use whatever we’ve got” or “let’s keep it from getting boring” approach might make it easier for you to get the newsletter out the door, you’re making it tough for donors to recognize it at a glance (that’s all the time you get) and absorb it.Instead, create a content formula or mix based on your donor personas’ wants and interests. Consistently following this formula makes it easier for you to find and craft the content you need and for readers to recognize your newsletter at a glance—increasing the odds that they’ll read it.last_img read more

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