Vermont Tax Reform Plan Announced

first_imgVermont has announced a personal income tax reform plan in response to the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA).The TCJA revised parts of the federal personal income tax structure that flow through to Vermont. Accordingly, to stabilize the state’s tax system, the Vermont reform plan would make various changes, including those discussed below.Personal exemptions: Under the plan, personal exemptions would be reintroduced, at $4,000 each.Deductions: The plan would create deductions equal to $6,000 for single filers, $12,000 for joint filers, and $9,000 for heads of households.Rates: The plan would keep tax brackets the same, while lowering marginal rates.Charitable contribution credit: A 5% tax credit would be created for charitable contributions.VTax Connect, Vermont Department of Taxes, February 6, 2018Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

Read More →

Tas State Cup & Junior State Cup

first_imgThe State Cup will be played on Saturday, 21 November, while the Junior State Cup will be played on Sunday, 22 November 2009. As well as the two tournaments, Touch Football Tasmania will be holding a referee forum on Friday, 20 November. The evening will be hosted by National Referee Panel member Ian Matthew and one of Australia’s leading referees Adam Foley. The two will also be in attendance at the State Cup and Junior State Cup. The State Cup has been moved to accommodate selections for the Tasmanian teams which will compete at the 2010 National Touch League. Combined Northern teams will take on Southern Touch in Open Men’s, Women’s and Mixed, Men’s and Women’s 30’s and over, as well as Men’s and Women’s 18’s and under. Southern Touch will be looking for another clean sweep of the tournament, after winning every division at the last State Cup in Hobart in January 2009.The games commence at 9.00am on Saturday, with the final game of the day to be played at 4.20pm. The Junior State Cup will be held the next day, with the following divisions being contested in both Girls and Boys: 12 years and under, 14 years and under and 16 years and under. Games will commence at 9.00am.For more information, please visit the Touch Football Tasmania website:www.tastouch.com.aulast_img read more

Read More →

6 STEPPS to viral success for your cause

first_imgby Kate Olsen, VP of Strategic Projects at Network for Good @Kate4GoodFellow cause marketers, wouldn’t you like a dollar for every time someone told you to ‘make it go viral?’ The beauty and frustration of virality is that you never know what will catch on. Context, creativity and conversation all have to align to get tens, hundreds or thousands of people to talk about your idea at the same time. We may not be able to make things go viral by sheer force of will, but Jonah Berger has a few ideas about how to engineer messages and campaigns that are more likely to spread. Below are a few tips from his new book Contagious: Why Things Catch On. Jonah outlines six key STEPPS that will transform your cause marketing messages into content that will entertain, inspire and incite people to spread the word.1. Social Currency: How will talking about your campaign affect the sharer’s status in his/her community? Will it make the sharer look knowledgeable, in the know, generous?Example: Packaging your message in a slick piece of media, such as the documentary Girl Rising, makes it easy for people to recommend – they seem intellectual, generous and pop culture savvy.2. Triggers: Can you relate your message to a context or habit that is already part of the sharer’s daily life? Examples: Workplace giving and volunteering as a social norm, giving a $1 at checkout, or this NYC Department of Health anti-soda campaign 3. Emotion: Does sharing your message move people emotionally? Can you touch the heart?Examples: Charity: Water puts the supporter as the hero of the campaign, showcasing the personal connection to the cause to share with social networks. This RedSnappa video epitomizes making an emotional connection with your message.4. Public: Can you add a social proof element to your message so people can see that others support your cause?Examples: Movember mustaches, breast cancer pink ribbons, Livestrong yellow bracelets, ‘I Voted’ stickers5. Practical Value: Does spreading your message help people help others? What is the impact you are driving?Example: Causes that make the supporter experience tangible include Dress for Success and Adopt A Classroom. Consumer campaigns that make a tangible donation alongside a useful product include One Pack = One Vaccine and FEED Projects.6. Stories: Is your message or campaign related to a larger narrative people want to share? Examples: Ben & Jerry’s went to congress with a 900 Pound Baked Alaska to protest drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. (Ben & Jerry’s made a social statement but used their product to illustrate their point, that makes the story sticky relevant and memorable.)Want to know how to craft a powerful story? Download this archived webinar presentation from Jonah Sachs on ‘Winning the Story Wars’.P.S. Thank you to PointWorthy for recommending this fabulous read.last_img read more

Read More →

You can do it! Goal setting for #GivingTuesday

first_imgNow create your own giving pyramid and think it through. If it feels ambitious but achievable, then it is a great place to start with a first year goal. If it seems too easy to achieve, boost the dollar amount. Too much of a stretch? Dial back.Leverage with matching fundsOne of the most powerful tools on #GivingTuesday is matching funds. Consider identifying a lead donor for your #GivingTuesday campaign who is willing to donate marketing fuel to your campaign engine, with matching funds.Even a small amount of matching fund dollars can provide significant benefit to a campaign. If you can raise as little as 5% – 10% of your total fundraising goal in matching funds, there are simple but effective ways to use this to amplify your campaign. These are a few ways to deploy the dollars effectively: · Match a % of dollar raised up to the amount of matching funds you have. So if you have $5,000 against a $50,000 goal, match $1 for every $10 raised until you reach your goal.· Match the first gifts every hour up to an hourly amount. So, if you have $10,000 in matching funds, match the first $1,000 each hour for the busiest ten hours of the day.· Match only gifts up to a certain amount. If one of your goals is number of donors, rather than just dollars, cap your matching funds at $100 or another amount that reflects your likely average gift.· Match gifts that further other objectives, like donors that set up recurring gifts. In this instance, consider doing a bonus match for a monthly donation, since these are an organization’s most engaged supporters over time. Your goal will be one of the most visible anchors of your #GivingTuesday campaign, so make it a motivator. It should be big and meaningful enough to get people excited to work hard. If it’s too attainable, it will feel like just another day at the office, and it will be hard to motivate your team.Everything you do for the next eight weeks depends on motivation and focus; set that goal today, and start planning your giving party on December 2nd! Party on!If you’re a fundraiser, you’re seeing news about #GivingTuesday everywhere.And the buzz is for good reason – #GivingTuesday is not only the launch of the giving season, but has become an international celebration of generosity. And your donors, prospects, staff and volunteers are likely to be hearing a lot about the big day – from you or someone. So, it’s time to solidify your #GivingTuesday plans.GivingTuesday, when done well, can have all the excitement and engagement of a great party, while building awareness and donations for your cause. It can also carry good feelings forward through the December giving season to boost your overall year-end fundraising efforts.What will make it a great day?Like a great party, the secrets to #GivingTuesday success combine great planning with a little magic. And like a party theme, your campaign goal is the part of the plan from which everything else stems. If you ran a #GivingTuesday campaign last year, you have a benchmark against which to think about 2014. If you’re in your first year, setting goals will be an educated best guess. Achieving your first year goal is where the (Planning + Luck) = Success equation comes in. Dollars are likely to be one of the key elements you measure, but it doesn’t need to be your only goal. These are a few goals to consider instead of, or in addition to, funds raised:· Number of donors· Number of new donors· Number of volunteers/hours (if you are including an activity)· Number of recurring donors· % Participation among key groups – like staffBuild a pyramidEven if you don’t have prior experience with #GivingTuesday, you can do some predictive planning around logical paths to your goals. Giving pyramids are a simple way to add a quantitative element to planning your dollar goal. They let you sanity check your goal by putting it on paper, rather than just guessing.How do you build a giving pyramid? Let’s take one example: Your nonprofit would like to raise $50,000 on #GivingTuesday. If you’re a small nonprofit, just eliminate zeroes from this example.Here is one illustration of how to predict a path to success with a giving pyramid:· $50,000 Goal· 8,500 donors in data file· 255 Donors if you achieve 3% participation (and you’ll definitely attract new donors too, so this should be a safe bet)So how might this set up in a giving pyramid? last_img read more

Read More →

How Fundraising with Spreadsheets Got Me Fired

first_imgEvent DonorsAttended an event in the current fiscal year, but has not made an annual giftFirst gift, flat amount of $25-$40 for a special program Earlier in my career, I was terminated after a spectacular overestimation of my abilities.Armed with a tone-deaf, supreme confidence that I could make great things happen, but for a new tagline and a new brochure, I not only created barriers for 2,000 donors who gave a combined $400,000 each year to give again, but I spent $55,000 more than budgeted to produce the worst possible results during the best possible time for fundraising—and made all of these decisions, relying on roughly seven different spreadsheets of names, gift dates and gift amounts.Consequently, and without much warning nor surprise, I got fired. I was certain, though, I was leaving an organization that didn’t understand me or fundraising, but at the time (and as a young, early 20-something), neither did I. Like many new-to-fundraising professionals, I had more passion than expertise; I had more hubris than self-awareness; and had more “I tried to say” than “I tried to understand.”I also had more ideas than organized data.Since that time, I have learned a great deal, but see many, talented fundraising professionals making the same unnecessary mistakes I did. While I do have genuine empathy for passionate people who try to help and fail (or succeed too slowly), I also see the great cost it has for each nonprofit organization, most of whom could not sustain a mistake of $5,000, let alone $55,000.Within the nonprofit sector, there is a widely known—and not yet wholly addressed—dysfunction in the fundraising profession: We quit or get fired after a comparatively record short amount of time—just 277 days, on average.The first no-nonsense assessment of this dysfunction came from the study UnderDeveloped: A National Study of Challenges Facing Nonprofit Fundraising.  A joint project of CompassPoint and the Evelyn and Walter Haas, Jr. Fund, the report found high levels of turnover and lengthy vacancies in development director positions throughout the sector. More significantly, the study reveals deeper issues that contribute to instability in the development director role, including a lack of basic fundraising systems and inadequate attention to fund development among key board and staff leaders.For its part, the report quantifies much of what the sector has long known, but fails to accept and address: We have to create the conditions for fundraising success before we can demand it, let alone budget it. In last fifteen years, though, I have worked with more than 200 professional fundraisers and their boards, executive directors and see what we need to understand, embrace, and commit to action.Data, not opinions or “hunchery,” creates results.You were hired because you are creative, tenacious and care deeply about the cause you will leverage inspire your community to give. You have great ideas, but they should be considered only in the context of what has been tried before at the organization, why it worked or didn’t work, and what your donors are telling you based upon when they gave, how much and for what reasons. Without that these basic data elements, there is a high probably you won’t success as planned—or at least in the time you’re allotting and/or needed to achieve success.Data is power and power for fundraisers is know who to ask for how much and when. It’s difficult to do this when you are fundraising with spreadsheets. However, start with the basics and make sure, if you are not yet using donor management software, you work those spreadsheets to do what I call Gift-Level Recency Segmentation: SegmentAttributesTarget Ask Amount Non-DonorsProspects for whom you have a mailing or email address, but have not ever yet made a giftFirst gift, flat amount of $25-$40 for a special program Renewed DonorsMade a gift in the current fiscal yearSecond gift, upgrade/special program appealcenter_img Current DonorsMade a gift in the last fiscal year, but not yet in the current yearLast gift amount + 50% more; or recurring/monthly giving program enrollment Lapsed DonorsMade a gift two years ago, or prior, but not since or in the current fiscal yearLast gift amount, special program appeal If you can create simple segmentation as shown in the chart above, you have a much greater chance of increasing donor retention, renewing current donors and converting event attendees into annual donors. The right donor management software will make your life much easier—it will make this process go smoothly, it will be more accurate and it will allow you to spend time fundraising, instead of “spreadsheeting” behind a desk when you are scrambling for time to get it all done.last_img read more

Read More →

Maternal Morbidities in the Journal of Population, Health and Nutrition

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on July 5, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The June issue of the Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition published by our colleagues at icddr,b focuses on the neglected issue of maternal morbidities.Introducing the issue, Mary Ellen Stanton and Neal Brandes of USAID write:This series of papers presents, for the first time in two geographic areas, a comprehensive snapshot of the short- and long-term consequences of acute maternal morbidity. The icddr,b surveillance site in Matlab, Bangladesh, has a unique set of records of the reproductive health of individual women that provide data accumulated for decades. This was selected as an ideal site to draw upon the database to examine retrospectively long-term and prospectively selected short-term consequences of maternal ill-health. This is the first attempt to obtain greater precision on the consequences of maternal ill-health, using a robust methodology and an extensive dataset, with added qualitative studies and postpartum physical examinations of women following childbirth. In addition, we have included a study that provides contrasting and additional information from Action Research and Training for Health in rural Rajasthan, India.In an editorial, Marge Koblinsky et al. note how little we currently know about maternal morbidities:While the estimates of maternal mortality and its consequences are built on relatively limited data, women who suffer from direct obstetric complications that kill—obstructed or prolonged labour, puerperal sepsis, septic abortion, severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, and postpartum haemorrhage—are estimated to be far higher in number yet less well-documented. The global estimates range from 15% of pregnant women suffering from complications—about 20 million women annually—to 1-2% in resource-poor settings when the definition is restricted to the most severe morbidities.Even less is known about the numbers and description of the consequences women may suffer as a result of pregnancy and childbirth and the life threatening obstetric complications. These consequences—maternal morbidities or disabilities—are estimated to affect 15-20 million women worldwide each year.The other papers published in the issue explore:the types and severities of maternal morbidities in Matlab and Chandpur, Bangladesh;social, economic, and cultural factors associated with maternal morbidities;perceptions and consequences of cesarean births;psychological well-being during pregnancy;physical and emotional violence against women with maternal disabilities;the impact of maternal morbidities on child development;the economic cost of maternal morbidities;community-based methods for understanding maternal morbidities; andthe physical, economic, and psychological consequences of morbidities in the first year postpartum.Share this:last_img read more

Read More →

New Resource Page: Respectful Maternity Care

first_imgPosted on April 11, 2013March 13, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Along with the respectful maternity care guest blog series, the MHTF has launched a new resource page on respectful care. The page provides an overview of the major concerns for efforts to humanize care during pregnancy and childbirth, as well as links to organizations working on issues related to ensuring that women are treated with dignity during pregnancy and labor; recent articles on issues related to respectful care; and posts from the MHTF blog.We hope you will have a look at the resources that are currently posted, and return often, since the page will be updated as new resources become available. Finally, we invite you to submit your suggestions for additional resources that may be included.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Read More →

Midwives, “the Frontline and Backbone of Maternal Health,” Face Difficult Working Environments

first_imgPosted on May 30, 2013August 15, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Our coverage of the Women Deliver 2013 conference continues–with a Storify featuring highlights from the second and third days  of the conference, this guest post by Sandeep Bathala of the Wilson Center.Midwives play a critical but unheralded role in maternal health. Their skills are sometimes marginalized in otherwise well-meaning discussions about professionalizing care, and, as was discussed at the Wilson Center earlier this month, they often work in conditions that undermine their ability to provide high quality, respectful maternity care. So when I found the room overflowing at Wednesday’s Women Deliver session, Midwives: Empowerment, Respect, and Quality, I took that as a good sign that midwives will not be overlooked much longer. Here are some highlights from the session:“Midwives are the frontline and backbone” of maternal health, said Pat Brodie of the Papua New Guinea Maternal and Child Health Initiative and WHO Collaborating Center for Nursing, Midwifery, and Health Development. But, she pointed out, recruitment of midwives has failed to keep pace with need, in part because so many positions carry non-existent or low salaries, few incentives for success, little time off, and lack professional training opportunities.Gajananda Prakash Bhandari, Program Director at the Nepal Public Health Foundation  described how some issues such as the risks of walking long distances at night, or a lack of support husbands and mother-in-laws who prefer women stay close to their families can discourage women from becoming midwives. Bhandari noted that in places where midwives have higher job satisfaction and feel secure, there are notable increase in their use, which means healthier mothers and children. He proposed scaling up new community-based security committees to address concerns about the safety risks of traveling at night, noting that this could also protect midwives from abusive family members of pregnant women.Afghanistan is one of the least secure places in the world to be a midwife, and it has one of the world’s highest maternal mortality ratios. However, as Pashtoon Azfar, a regional midwife adviser for the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM), pointed out, this was not always the case. In the 1950s, female members of the Afghan royal family were midwives and teachers of midwives, exemplifying the respect for midwifery at the time.  In fact, as Azfar said, the literal translation of “midwife” in the local language is “competent.” But, more than three decades of war took a severe toll on the country’s health system and under Taliban rule, women were denied access to education, and, as a result, there was an extreme shortage in female health providers, including midwives. As a result, maternal mortality skyrocketed: in the 1990s, the maternal mortality ratio was estimated to be 1,300 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. As Azfar pointed out, there have been major changes that Afghanistan in the past decade, particularly the revitalization of midwifery that has been part of health systems strengthening efforts, including an effort by USAID and Jphiego to advance midwifery. “Engagement of women in this profession has led to some level of political and social empowerment,” said Azfar. “However, still there is a long way to go.” For instance, the program is still addressing challenges related to policy development, selection criteria, recruitment, education, deployment, and supervision of midwives. But, there are clear positive effects already: participating midwives have reported increased self-confidence and economic benefits for themselves and their families, as well as a new ability to leave their homes, and midwifery has a bigger presence at the policy level.For more on this week’s news and events on midwifery, read UNFPA Deputy Executive Director Kate Gilmore’s op-ed, “Midwives do more than just deliver babies in The Hindu, check out coverage of the Second Global Symposium on Midwifery from UNFPA, the ICM, or follow the discussion on Twitter at #midwivesmatter, #midwives, as well as coverage of Women Deliver at #WDlive and #WD2013.  Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Read More →

Poor Fetal and Infant Growth is Not Inevitable in Poor Countries

first_imgPosted on July 7, 2014November 4, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)For the first time it can be said that fetal growth and birth size is not predetermined by genetics, but by the health status of the mother. Fetal growth and birthlength are incredibly similar when babies are born to well-nourished, well-educated mothers—despite diverse ethnic and genetic backgrounds.Today INTERGROWTH-21st, an international study led by researchers at Oxford University, published its first results paper of the project, which proves the previously held belief that size and growth of babies differ due to ethnicity and race is not true. This has tremendous implications on the importance of maternal health care and interventions.“Currently we are not all equal at birth. But we can be,” said the lead author Professor Jose Villar of the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, University of Oxford. “We can create a similar start for all by making sure mothers are well educated and nourished, by treating infection and by providing adequate antenatal care. Don’t tell us nothing can be done. Don’t say that women in some parts of the world have small children because they are predestined to do so. It’s simply not true.”In order to study fetal and infant growth around the world, researchers studied nearly 60,000 pregnancies in eight defined urban areas in Brazil, China, India, Italy, Kenya, Oman, the UK and the USA. Using identical methodologies and equipment, researchers performed ultrasounds from early pregnancy through delivery to measure fetal bone growth and at delivery measured birth length and head circumference. This representative data is the first of its kind.But why is it so important to have these standards and understand what affects fetal and infant growth? Currently no single global standard for fetal growth exists, instead there are at least 100 differing standards, posing problems for both identifying and treating undernourished newborns. “This is very confusing for doctors and mothers and makes no biological sense. How can a fetus or a newborn be judged small in one clinic or hospital and treated accordingly, only for the mother to go to another city or country, and be told that her baby is growing normally,” said Professor Stephen Kennedy, University of Oxford, one of the senior authors of the paper. The standard produced by the INTERGROWTH-21st fixes this problem. The standard serves as a global standard for fetal and infant growth—the first of its kind—and is consistent with existing WHO standards for infants. For example, the mean length at birth of the newborns in the INTERGROWTH-21st study was 49.4 ± 1.9 cm, compared with 49.5 ±1.9 cm in the WHO infant study.The INTERGROWTH-21st growth standard will help maternal and neonatal practitioners around the world address the problem of poor growth. As of 2010, 27% of births around the world, or 32.4 million babies a year in low- and middle-income countries, are born already undernourished. Poor growth evident by small for gestational age babies has a significant implication on an infant’s start to life—putting them at increased risk of illness and death compared to babies well-nourished at birth. Small birth size also increases a person’s risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease in adulthood. In addition, caring for undernourished newborns puts incredible strain and economic burdens on health systems and societies.Until now it was thought disparities in growth were largely determined by unchangeable factors, like genetics. Now we know the ability to close disparities and ensure fetal and infant growth and health is in our hands. Professor Zulfiqar Bhutta, from The Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan and the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada, who is the Chair of the Steering Committee of this global research team, says: “The fact that when mothers are in good health, babies grow in the womb in very similar ways the world over is a tremendously positive message of hope for all women and their families. But there is a challenge as well. There are implications in terms of the way we think about public health: This is about the health and life chances of future citizens everywhere on the planet. All those who are responsible for health care will have to think about providing the best possible maternal and child health.”Poor growth is not inevitable. Knowing that all babies can grow at the same rate empowers us to provide appropriate care—evidence-based care that ensures healthy mothers, healthy babies.To read the full article on these new standards, click here. In addition, more information about the INTERGROWTH-21st Project, including updates on the release of the new growth standards, can be found at its website: www.intergrowth21.orgShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Read More →

How to Inspire Donors Across Generations

first_imgThe changing of the guard is as old as time. It can be a bumpy road if you don’t plan for it. The older donor generations can feel pushed out of the very causes they helped launch. Meanwhile, the younger generations cry out for change and inclusion. How do you reach across the generations and bring everyone to the table?Compare the four primary generations of donors—Mature, Boomer, Gen X, Millennial—and you’ll see there’s more that unites us than divides us. Research scientist Jennifer Deal observed similarities in her book, Retiring the Generation Gap: How Employees Young and Old Can Find Common Ground. She found that all generations:Value family, integrity, honesty, trustworthiness.Want respect.Believe leaders must be trustworthy.Like to receive feedback.Don’t like change.Base loyalty on context, not age.Want to learn and better ourselves.In “How to Engage Multiple Generations of Donors,” we explore additional generational insights on giving activity, volunteer rates, tech use, and communication preferences. Incorporate these findings into your donor engagement to create lasting relationships.Generational Communication TipsYour donor’s preferred method of communication doesn’t always depend on their age. Gen X may prefer email and Boomers may prefer a phone call, but they both enjoy receiving a thank you card in the mail. Ask your donors how they prefer to be contacted, record that information in your donor management system, and use it to create a deeper level of engagement.Matures respect authority and respond to tradition and long-term commitment. Highlight your organization’s history and your position as a leader in your field.Boomers are dedicated, hard-working, goal-oriented individuals. They expect quality services and treatment. Put your nonprofit’s work—and your results—front and center. Inspire them with your story and your mission.Gen X donors risk being overlooked in favor of their Boomer and Millennial counterparts. Pay special attention to them today. As they enter the peak years of their careers, many Gen Xers are looking for proactive ways to support organizations they believe in.Millennials are drawn to transparency and access. As donors, they’re interested in more than just their name on a donor list. They want to contribute in different ways. Incorporate more targeted contact and engagement as part of cultivating this generation of donors. Bring them into your work on a deeper level.Never before has there been such a wide array of communication options. From the classic approach of direct mail to the modern invention of instant messaging, each generation has their preference. Use your donor data to create engagement that bridges the generation gap once and for all.Check out our infographic, Bridging The Donor Generation Gap, for more information on generational giving!last_img read more

Read More →