Taipei’s EVA puts the premium in premium class

first_imghe new Carmona Red Rimowa will find its way into many a carry-on. Photo: EVA Air Taipei-based EVA Air has long been a quiet leader in the most premium of premium business classes.An early adopter of the Zodiac (now Safran) Cirrus outward-facing herringbone seat in its long-haul business class, branded as Royal Laurel, EVA’s soft product has matched this investment — and not just in its famous Hello Kitty planes either.The airline has long featured well above-average Champagne for business class passengers, well above the quality that many other airlines provide for first class. Depending on the route, either Krug or Veuve Clicquot’s vintage prestige cuvée La Grande Dame are offered.Read our ratings for Eva Air.Its amenity kits, too, are first class-level, with a new deep burgundy kit that replicates the iconic Rimowa suitcase.“Those departing from Taiwan receive overnight kits in Rimowa’s popular new ‘Carmona Red,’” says the airline. “Contents include a color-coordinated eye mask, cozy socks, a hairbrush, a microfiber cloth for cleaning glasses and screens on personal devices, earplugs, a toothbrush and toothpaste and skincare essentials from Clarins.”On inbound flights, it’s Ferragamo, “inspired by ancient Taiwanese majolica tiles, the case is a harmonious blend of contemporary fashion and Taiwanese culture stocked with Salvatore Ferragamo lotion, hand cream and lip balm elegantly scented with the brand’s new Bianco di Carrara fragrance.”Hearty portions of skincare, a proper-sized toothbrush, grip-soled socks and a microfibre cloth for cleaning glasses or electronic devices are included in both kits.EVA is also raising the airline pajama game with a new set from celebrity designer Jason Wu, featuring the usual stretch cotton but also a funky yet practical side-buttoning neck.Eva premiumThe pajama top collars are funky yet practical. All Photos: EVA AirThat kind of detail allows passengers who feel a draught around their necks to button up warmly, while those who tend to overheat can unbutton to the shoulder to allow for extra airflow.New food from Huang Ching-biao, a master chef specializing in the Tan aristocratic family style cuisine from China’s dynastic era, will be served departing Taipei to Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco in Royal Laurel (long haul) business class.It is, says EVA,  “prepared with slow, painstaking, traditional cooking techniques and nothing but the best ingredients, the inflight dining experience begins with a pork shoulder slice wrapped with cucumber and Thai-style shrimp followed by golden chicken soup with seafood in a rich, golden broth.“The main course is braised abalone in oyster sauce served with stir-fried rice with caramel olive while dessert is an elegant concoction of Tan’s mashed taro and sweet potato in water chestnut sauce.”Eva premiumCelebrating Tan-style cuisine is a bang-on brand idea.Meanwhile, passengers heading from Taipei to Brisbane, Paris and Vienna in business will enjoy seasonal desserts from Andrea Bonaffini, the Italian patissier behind Taipei’s Yellow Lemon dessert bar.There’s a new welcome beverage when you settle into your seat, too, “a cold-pressed mango and mixed fruit juice made from a blend of Taiwan’s exceptionally flavorful Irwin mangoes, pleasingly tart and aromatic passion fruit, tangy oranges and garden-fresh carrots”.This sort of signature drink is growing in popularity as airlines seek to make a positive and distinctive first impression on passengers. There’s also a little extra treat with coffee and tea: Eclat de Valrhona, a 61 percent premium cocoa dark chocolate from chocolatier Valrhona near Lyon in France.eva premiumEVA’s new fruit juice will be a refreshing start to the flight.The whole effect is to bring quite cost-effective changes that — to steal a phrase from the very zeitgeisty Marie Kondo — spark joy among passengers who might be stressed, tired or simply not expecting any magic from the airline experience.A stonking bottle of champers, an amenity kit you might actually like to keep, a really tasty bite to eat: this is the sort of surprise and delight that airlines need to be creating.last_img read more

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Limiting World Cup to 10 teams a backward step: Sachin Tendulkar

first_imgBatting legend Sachin Tendulkar feels the decision of International Cricket Council (ICC) to restrict the World Cup to 10 nations is a “backward step”.In December last year the ICC announced that only 10 teams will participate in 2019 World Cup from 14 in the 2011 and 2015 events. This decision has come under lot of criticism after looking at the performances of Associate nations in the ongoing World Cup.Tendulkar, who was part of India’s 2011 World Cup winning side, said that by limiting the teams would also limit the scope for globalisation of the game. He also urged the ICC to expand the tournament to as many as 25 teams.”(The ICC’s decision) is slightly disappointing because as a cricketer I want the game to be globalised as much as possible and, according to me, this is a backward step,” the former Indian captain said.”We’ve got to find ways of encouraging the lesser teams.”Ireland’s victory over the West Indies in Nelson last month was the most recent occasion an Associate nation has upset a Test playing side at a World Cup. The Irish produced a shock win over England at the 2011 World Cup and also beat Pakistan in 2007.Also, Kenya’s victories over 1996 champions Sri Lanka in 2003 and the two-time Cup champions Windies in 1996 rank as some of the most memorable moments in World Cup history.Tendulkar said those results prove the Associate nations can match it with the full member teams and need more regular opportunities against the best teams in order to develop.advertisementHe wants ‘A’ teams from leading cricket nations to schedule regular fixtures against Associate teams in between World Cups.”The lesser teams have, in each and every World Cup, they always surprise top teams. And they can do it on a consistent basis only if they’re given a fair platform to express their talent,” Tendulkar was quoted as saying by Cricket Australia website.”Right now, they get up after four years on the cricket world’s biggest platform and they’re expected to play and compete with the likes of Australia, South Africa, India, New Zealand, West Indies, Sri Lanka, so many top sides. It’s unfair to them,” he added.”Why not get Australia A, England A, New Zealand A, South Africa A, New Zealand A, India A, everyone, to go and visit these countries and play them on a regular basis. And see, not just 14 teams, but how can we get to 25 teams participating in the next World Cup?”Tendulkar pointed out that the World Cup expansion is vital to the development of the game in countries where cricket is not a major sport.”It is not just about the top six or seven sides. If we are to globalise this game we have to get more and more people excited about cricket and the fan following only follows the result,” Tendulkar said.”If the results are good then you have more fans. So it’s important that they play good cricket consistently for a longer period, not just one good performance and then suddenly they go underground for four years and then turn up if they do well in those qualifying rounds,” the 41-year-old added.”So I would say it’s something the ICC needs to look into and I hope they look into it.”Tendulkar is the only player to have scored one hundred international centuries. He also holds the record for most number of runs in both One-Day International (ODI) and Test cricket.last_img read more

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Tas State Cup & Junior State Cup

first_imgThe State Cup will be played on Saturday, 21 November, while the Junior State Cup will be played on Sunday, 22 November 2009. As well as the two tournaments, Touch Football Tasmania will be holding a referee forum on Friday, 20 November. The evening will be hosted by National Referee Panel member Ian Matthew and one of Australia’s leading referees Adam Foley. The two will also be in attendance at the State Cup and Junior State Cup. The State Cup has been moved to accommodate selections for the Tasmanian teams which will compete at the 2010 National Touch League. Combined Northern teams will take on Southern Touch in Open Men’s, Women’s and Mixed, Men’s and Women’s 30’s and over, as well as Men’s and Women’s 18’s and under. Southern Touch will be looking for another clean sweep of the tournament, after winning every division at the last State Cup in Hobart in January 2009.The games commence at 9.00am on Saturday, with the final game of the day to be played at 4.20pm. The Junior State Cup will be held the next day, with the following divisions being contested in both Girls and Boys: 12 years and under, 14 years and under and 16 years and under. Games will commence at 9.00am.For more information, please visit the Touch Football Tasmania website:www.tastouch.com.aulast_img read more

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The 6 things you must know about the science of persuasion

first_imgIf you have never read the classic book Influence by Robert Cialdini, you really should. But you’re also in luck, because the Influence at Work team just released this summary of the six principles of persuasion that the book covers. Spend 11 minutes watching this video – it’s well worth your time.Trouble viewing the video? Go here.No time to watch? Here’s my summary of the principles and how they apply to us.1. Reciprocity – People tend to return a favor, thus all those annoying address labels charities send out as a fundraising ploy.2. Scarcity – Perceived scarcity fuels demand. “Only four memberships are left” prompts action!3. Authority – People will tend to obey authority figures. What expert can attest to the value of your organization?4. Consistency – If people commit to an idea or goal, they are more likely to follow through. It’s why pledging is a great option for people who aren’t ready to take action.5. Liking – People are easily persuaded by other people whom they like. That’s why you want your champions spreading the word about your cause among their friends and family.6. Consensus – People will do what other people are doing. That’s why it’s great to show who is taking action for your cause – others are likely to conform.last_img read more

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Your quick guide to better nonprofit financial management

first_imgIf you feel the need to strengthen your financial management savvy, check out StrongNonprofits.org, a new website featuring free tools, how-tos and guides.Developed in partnership between The Wallace Foundation and Fiscal Management Associates, the site contains more than 64 resources for anyone involved in nonprofit financial planning, monitoring, operations or oversight, and particularly nonprofit afterschool program providers. Features range from a nonprofit accounting guide, to an article on sensible growth strategies, to a podcast on how to understand the true costs of programming. The site also offers an array of helpful tools, including the “Go or No Go Decision Tool,” a questionnaire that helps an organization decide whether accepting a contract would help – or hurt – the group’s bottom line.The site includes:• A Five-Step Guide to Budget Development—a presentation that describes a team approach to budgeting essentials such as setting financial goals, forecasting results and monitoring progress.• Budgeting and Financial Planning Tools—Excel-based templates to provide organizations with a framework for building program-based budgets, projecting cash flow, and evaluating revenue scenarios.• Guide to Effective Board Leadership—an easy-to-follow description of how nonprofit boards can do the necessary financial oversight of their organizations.You can find the site here.last_img read more

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How to inspire with stories: Season of Giving Campaign

first_imgA story’s emotional power is a fundraiser’s best tool to gain the attention of donors and inspire action. One fundraising campaign that is hitting it out of the park with its emotional “wow” factor is Ronald McDonald House Charities’ Season of Giving. The campaign’s message reinforces the work that RMHC does by reminding supporters that there is strength in numbers and that they are really giving the gift of togetherness when they make a contribution. I had a chance to chat with Jennifer Smith, Senior Director of Communications & Special Programs at Ronald McDonald House Charities to learn more about this campaign and its approach to connecting donors with the work they make possible. Jennifer was kind enough to share a bit of the process behind this amazing campaign and offer some tips to other nonprofits this holiday season.“For any nonprofit, but certainly for Ronald McDonald House Charities, our goal is to share the impact of the work we do with the support of our donors. Every campaign we do lets our donors know that the work they make possible is making a difference in the lives of the families we serve. For potential donors, this illustrates the fact that they are needed,” Jennifer says.The Seasons of Giving campaign includes donor communication pieces, direct mail appeals, videos, online ads, and social media outreach. In this multi-channel campaign, there are unifying elements, such as a red ribbon motif that provides visual connectivity across platforms.Jennifer has a great reminder for all nonprofit fundraisers: Don’t forget to match the message with the medium. “We’re careful to tailor the message. You can’t just stick your direct mail language on Facebook. Different elements pull out different aspects. Use the different components of the story to target specific audience at the right time. We make sure the content is relevant but there are still the connected elements, such as branding and the overall messaging.”How did RMHC arrive at this campaign?Jennifer shares a fundamental, yet natural, shift, “There was a time when we spoke more to facts, figures and children served, but we found that to add more dimension to the message, we had to do that by telling the family stories. People are already willingly telling their stories—they want to be able to share what they’ve been through. They often want to give back and say, ‘We want to help YOU.’ You can’t manufacture authenticity. You need real people telling real stories.”Here are Jennifer’s tips for other nonprofits looking to capture and share stories:1. Listen to what people are already telling you. What are your supporters and beneficiaries saying? Take those words and insights and build a story from them. This helps your supporters understand how our work is making a difference, and that donors are the ones making it happen.2. Sharing stories encourages others to tell their stories. After seeing the Season of Giving campaign, it’s clear that it’s not just about the official videos or stories—it’s about allowing more people to open up and share their stories. “Social media is a wonderful listening tool; the dialogue that happens is inspiring. I haven’t been in their shoes, so when they’re sharing their stories organically, it is a powerful experience,” Jennifer says, giving us a great reminder of the beauty of social media. “If you’re listening you can be more insightful and tuned in to messages that resonate. It also allows those stores to be shared more easily and more widely.”3. Ask, but be sensitive. Don’t be afraid to ask, “Would you be willing to share your story?” Jennifer’s team is careful to recognize the challenges, “We’re very sensitive to the fact that some of these families are going through what they are going through. What is powerful about [the stories featured in our videos] is that Kayla and Christina are still fighting and working to heal from cancer.” Jennifer also reminds us that it’s important to have checkpoints throughout the process. Continually ask, “Are you still comfortable with telling this story?”4. Make it a part of your organization’s culture. Jennifer shares how this works at RMHC, “The way our system is structured, we rarely have to do a formal process. If we see something that catches our eye, we first reach out to our Chapter and ask permission to find out more. Then if timing is right, we talk to the family.” Jennifer adds, “We also use stories from corporate donors, such as McDonald’s owner/operators, volunteers, and staff, etc. One of our core tenets is our compassion, from our training of our staff people to volunteers. We exist to provide resources when people really need it, and this permeates throughout everything we do.” A big thank you to Jennifer for sharing her insight with our readers and to the people at RMHC for the great work they do. To find out more about the RMHC Season of Giving campaign, visit http://www.rmhc.org/season-of-giving.last_img read more

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Use Your Newsletters to Keep Donors Loyal, Focused, and Giving

first_imgFollow these steps to strengthen your relationship with donors and increase retention rates. In my next post on this topic, I’ll share some key strategies for creating email newsletters that won’t immediately see the delete button.With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build the strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org. You’ve seen it happen: When we stop putting energy into relationships with family and friends—relying on past interactions to hold us together—those relationships tend to fall apart. Like your college roommate or that work friend from your first job.Relationships with organization’s donors require the same kind of focus and energy for the duration—if you want to keep them happy, involved, and giving.Unfortunately, recent research suggests that most fundraisers are doing a poor job of maintaining connections, with donor retention rates at an all-time low of 39%. That means your organization could be cut from the give-to list at any point.But there is a proven approach to stopping this fatal attrition—placing hyperfocus on relationships with existing donors to keep them close. That’s mammoth potential, and your donor newsletter is a vital tool for bringing it to life.Here’s how to put your newsletter into play:1. Share, don’t ask.The primary goal of both print and e-newsletters is to reshape your donor relationships from transactional to one that’s more personal, productive, and long term—the big three of donor retention.The only way to get there is to get beyond the ask. After your prompt thanks to a donor for her first gift, you want to invite her further into your organization. Make her feel acknowledged, appreciated, and right at home, just as you would the first time you invite a new friend into your home.In much the same way, your newsletter invites donors in to experience your organization’s (and community’s) personality, promises, and values in a rich, close way.2. Connect your content and your people.Think of your newsletters as opportunities to visit with a donor. Your print newsletter (vital if your donor base skews heavily toward older supporters) is like a rich, immersive visit where you have the opportunity to get into deep conversation. (In many cases, an occasional print newsletter can actually help your organization stand out.) On the other hand, your e-news is more like a quick drop-in.Stories form the core of your newsletter. Prioritize the elements donors focus on most: photos, headlines, photo captions, and articles. Here’s where you show what your donors’ gifts have accomplished and tell how much you appreciate them.Send this version of yournewsletter in both formats only to active and recent donors so your voice stays clear and focused.3. Keep it all about donors—with an imaginary editorial board.It’s tough to remember that your organization is just one small part of your donors’ lives, especially when you live your job. But consider your personal donations—how often do you think about the organizations you support?Keep your donors front and center with an imaginary editorial board composed of personas (aka profiles: how-tos here) representing up to nine of your most important donor segments.Then, get to know your editorial board members by surrounding your desk with these profiles, and keep them in front of you while you write. It sounds hokey, but it works!4. Make it easy to recognize and remember.Using a different mix of written and graphic content, and sometimes even different layouts, for every issue is the most common error in print newsletter production. Ugh!Although this “use whatever we’ve got” or “let’s keep it from getting boring” approach might make it easier for you to get the newsletter out the door, you’re making it tough for donors to recognize it at a glance (that’s all the time you get) and absorb it.Instead, create a content formula or mix based on your donor personas’ wants and interests. Consistently following this formula makes it easier for you to find and craft the content you need and for readers to recognize your newsletter at a glance—increasing the odds that they’ll read it.last_img read more

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Year-End Fundraising Through the Lens of Donor Engagement

first_imgFall is a busy time of year. Whether it’s getting the kids back to school or the quick transitions between Halloween, Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, and Christmas, there are many reminders that the dog days of summer are long behind us. On top of all that, we are looking squarely in the face of the year-end fundraising push. Whether or not your fiscal year ends on December 31, donors and nonprofits alike know this is the prime giving season. Consider these stats from Network for Good’s Digital Giving Index:30% of all giving occurs in December.12% of all giving happens in the last three days of the year.Many terrific blog posts and webinars offer words of advice about how to end the year on a strong note. If we know we’ll have donors’ growing attention over the next two and a half months, I suggest looking at the end-of-year blitz as one part of a longer donor engagement plan. Sustainable fundraising embodies a year-round dialogue with your donors and isn’t limited to these last two to three months of the year. This is especially important to keep in mind since we know organizations have been facing a negative growth in donors: For every 100 new and recovered donors, 103 were lost through attrition. Your focus over these next few months should be on engaging the donors you have so they continue to give.Share, Celebrate, and Don’t OversolicitPenelope Burk, the guru of donor-centered fundraising, found in her research that the number one reason donors stop supporting an organization is that they feel they are being “oversolicited.” With tight deadlines and multichannel communications, it’s easy to get swept up in the transactional part of fundraising—getting those gifts in by December 31. Are your communications—e-newsletters, mailed and electronic solicitations, tweets, Facebook posts, and so on—bringing donors closer to your work and inspiring them to commit more deeply to your mission without always asking for money?Before you begin asking for year-end gifts, use a variety of multi-channel fundraising to bring your work and beneficiaries before your donors:Share with your donors’ examples of impact and stories of transformation that their gift made possible.Highlight what you were able to do because of the gifts you received from your donors.Celebrate your donors and make them feel that their support made a difference in some way.Now your solicitations will be natural extensions of the dialogue you’ve created around the results donors have helped you achieve, resulting in donors being more open to investing in you again.Engage Your Middle to Major Gift Donors and ProspectsMiddle to major donors generally have higher loyalty rates and consider their gifts to you as investments. Show these donors how much you valued them:Schedule staff or volunteer leadership calls to these larger donors just to thank them for their continued support and to share a few highlights of your year.Send this group of donors and prospects a personal letter, a link to a video or simple thank you card from one of your beneficiaries.Give these donors and prospects an up-close and in-person view of your work. Can they meet any of your staff and/or beneficiaries or participate in a one-off volunteer opportunity?Mind you, these are all stewardship activities that should not be isolated to year-end. But in the spirit of the seasons of thanking and giving, they can complement the inundation of solicitations these donors will be receiving from you and other organizations.Assess and Grow in 2016We all know that feeling of relief when December 31 has come and gone. How will you build off that year-end fundraising momentum in 2016? In addition to making sure all gifts are promptly processed and acknowledged (another key ingredient in Penelope Burk’s donor-centered fundraising), this is a good time to assess and adjust your plans for 2016 in two ways.First, determine which messages or communication format resonated most with your audience. Make necessary adjustments in your 2016 plans to ensure you’re speaking to your donors in the way that resonates best.Second, take stock of who gave to your organization:Did you have new donors (either first-time or lapsed donors who returned) and donors who upgraded their support? Call or visit your new and upgraded donors to thank them and find out what motivated their new or increased gifts.You might also conduct wealth-capacity screening to identify which of these donors has the potential for a larger commitment, and then tailor a personalized cultivation strategy to bring them closer to your organization.Did any of your LYBUNTs not make a gift? Focus on finding out why your larger and longstanding LYBUNTs didn’t include you in their philanthropic plans. Understanding what drove their decision is important for you to find out and could lead to renewed support down the road. It shows your donors that you care about their motivations and don’t just view them as a walking ATM.The “noise” of appeals and communications from organizations competing for limited philanthropic dollars will grow louder over the next couple of months. Use the themes of gratitude and generosity (of spirit, interest, and information) to drive thoughtful connection with your donors.Make this December your best year-end fundraising season ever with Network for Good’s smarter fundraising software, built just for nonprofits. Reach more donors, raise more money, and retain more supporters this year with easy-to-use tools and step-by-step coaching. We have everything you need for a bigger, better campaign, all under one roof. Find out more by speaking with one of our expert fundraising consultants.last_img read more

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6 Things You Need for a Successful Year-End Email

first_imgCreating your year-end email appeals? Don’t forget these six key ingredients:An obvious donation button.Your donate button should be big, bold, and above the fold. When your donors want to give, it needs to be as easy as possible. They shouldn’t need to hunt for the link to your donation page.A clear and specific call to action.A vague call to action like “support us” is more likely to confuse than to motivate. To be effective, make your calls to action highly specific and feasible.A sense of urgency.Compel your donors to take action with a real sense of urgency. Let your supporters know when there are only a few more days left to meet your annual goal.Contact information.Make sure to link to a contact page so donors can get in touch if they have an important question. It’s also important to include an easy way for readers to opt-out of your nonprofit’s emails (if you’re not sending from an email service provider like Constant Contact, be aware of CAN-SPAM laws).Mobile-friendly design.Smartphones make it easy to act in the moment, which is important because the decision to donate is often impulsive. Make sure your emails are mobile-friendly so you can easily connect with donors at any time, no matter where they are.A compelling case for giving.Asking for a donation is not enough. To stand out from the crowd, nonprofit fundraisers must make a compelling case for giving by using stories, building credibility, and packaging your message.last_img read more

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New Estimates Show Major Reduction in Maternal Mortality, But More Progress Needed

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 16, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)New global maternal mortality estimates were released today in a report by the World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and the World Bank. The report,“Trends in maternal mortality: 1990 to 2010”, shows that the number of women dying of pregnancy and childbirth related complications has almost halved in 20 years.  The estimates show that from 1990 to 2010, the annual number of maternal deaths has dropped from more than 543,000 to 287,000–and that a number of countries have already reached the MDG target of 75 per cent reduction in maternal death.Major highlights from the report:• In 2010, the global maternal mortality ratio was 210 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. Sub-Saharan Africa had the highest maternal mortality ratio at 500 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births.• In sub-Saharan Africa, a woman faces a 1 in 39 lifetime risk of dying due to pregnancy or childbirth-related complications. In South-eastern Asia the risk is 1 in 290 and in developed countries, it is 1 in 3,800.• Ten countries have 60 per cent of the global maternal deaths: India (56,000), Nigeria (40,000), Democratic Republic of the Congo (15,000), Pakistan (12,000), Sudan (10,000), Indonesia (9,600), Ethiopia (9,000), United Republic of Tanzania (8,500), Bangladesh (7,200) and Afghanistan (6,400).• Ten countries have already reached the MDG target of a 75 per cent reduction in maternal death: Belarus, Bhutan, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Iran, Lithuania, Maldives, Nepal, Romania and Viet Nam.Read the full press release here.Read the full report here.Join the conversation on Twitter at hashtag: #motherhood #MMR2012Over the past few years, the global health community has witnessed and contributed to the publication of more frequent and more technically advanced estimates for maternal mortality than ever before. This report adds to the growing body of evidence that is helping the maternal health community to measure and better understand the scope and trends of the problem. It is an exciting time in the field–and we encourage you to read the new report.Share this:last_img read more

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