What are financial firms doing to fight systemic racism?

first_img TD getting new head of private wealth, financial planning Share this article and your comments with peers on social media The May 25 killing of George Floyd incited protests and renewed calls to address systemic anti-Black racism — the latest in a movement that officially coalesced as Black Lives Matter in 2013 and has been ongoing for decades.Protesters are primarily focused on police brutality, but the financial world is not without culpability in furthering anti-Black racism. One in five Canadian investors plans to switch wealth providers: EY study For example, lenders in the U.S., and to a lesser extent Canada, practised “redlining” during the 20th century: denying mortgages to people in neighbourhoods where the majority of residents were Black people and minorities. Research shows the effects persist today.In the last decade, U.S. banks and their lending subsidiaries have spent millions settling claims alleging they discriminated against Black and Hispanic clients.On a more micro level, the U.S. divisions of two financial services firms each fired a high-ranking employee in the last two months after videos showed those employees engaging in actions widely regarded as racist.Since May 25, several financial firms have released anti-racism statements and made financial commitments in support of Black communities. Investment Executive asked 20 banks, asset managers, insurers and advisory firms operating in Canada how they are addressing anti-Black racism, as well as what percentage of their employees and executives are Black.Black representationOf the 20 firms, only two — BlackRock Inc. and Royal Bank of Canada — shared their percentage of Black employees, and only for the U.S. workforce.BlackRock reports that 3% of senior leaders (directors and above) and 5% of its U.S. workforce are Black, and that its goal is to “double representation of our Black senior leaders and increase overall representation by 30%” by 2024. RBC reports that Black people make up 5% of its U.S. workforce.According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 13.4% of the U.S. population identifies as Black or African-American, with a further 2.8% as multiracial.In Canada, federally regulated firms are required to report the representation levels of employees who self-identify as “Aboriginal peoples, members of visible minorities [VM] or persons with disabilities.” Nine of the 20 firms we spoke to are federally regulated, and six — the banks — report that data publicly. For 2019 (2018 for BMO and Scotiabank):BMO reported 38.8% VM employees in Canada, with 34.2% in senior roles (as of Q2 2020; goal: 30%). Indigenous people made up 1.2% of its Canadian workforce.CIBC reported 34% VM employees in Canada, with 18% in executive roles (goal: 22% by 2022). Indigenous people account for 1% of its Canadian workforce.National Bank reported 23.8% VM employees in Canada.RBC reported 37% VM employees in Canada, with 19% in executive roles (goal: 30%). Indigenous people accounted for 1.3% of its workforce (goal: 1.6%).Scotiabank reported 24.1% VM employees in Canada, with 18.8% in senior roles. Indigenous people made up 0.9% of its workforce.TD reported 38% VM employees in Canada, with 17.6% in vice-president roles or higher (goal: increase VM executives by 50% by 2025; double Black executives by 2022). Indigenous people constitute 1.5% of its workforce.In 2018, Scotiabank used benchmarks of 30.5% VM representation and 2.3% Indigenous representation based on how these groups are represented in the overall workforce, while BMO used a 27% benchmark for VM representation.According to the 2016 census, Black people make up 3.5% of Canada’s population.Firms acknowledged benefits and challenges around collecting race and ethnicity data.“We’d like to go down that path, but we’d like to do it respectfully,” says Janine Davies, chair of the inclusion council at Raymond James Ltd. and executive director of the Raymond James Canada Foundation. She says the firm plans to survey its employees on ethnicity by year-end.David Gunn, country leader for Edward Jones Canada, says his firm is working toward more robust self-identification for its employees. “My long-term vision is that our financial advisors would reflect the communities we’re serving,” Gunn says. “To ensure we’re doing that, we will need a better measurement system.”Dominic Cole-Morgan, senior vice-president at Scotiabank, said in a statement that the bank launched an updated employee diversity survey earlier this month to obtain “further data on the representation of specific employee groups, including Black people, Indigenous peoples and people of colour (BIPOC).”A spokesperson for BMO confirmed that the bank will begin tracking the percentage of BIPOC employees “as part of setting new [five-year diversity] goals.”Targets and financial commitmentsThe Canadian Council of Business Leaders Against Anti-Black Systemic Racism and its BlackNorth Initiative launched June 10 with the aim of increasing “the representation of Blacks in boardrooms and executive suites across Canada.” The council’s founder and chair is Wes Hall, executive chair and founder of Kingsdale Advisors; one of the co-chairs is Victor Dodig, president and CEO of CIBC.The BlackNorth Initiative CEO pledge requires signatories to commit to Black people holding at least 3.5% of executive and board roles based in Canada by 2025 and to hiring at least 5% of its student workforce from the Black community.Among the 20 firms Investment Executive contacted, BMO, CI Financial Corp., CIBC, Manulife Financial Corp., Scotiabank and Sun Life have agreed to sign the pledge. Scotiabank CEO Brian Porter and Mackenzie Investments CEO Barry McInerney are both on the board of directors for BlackNorth.Separate from the pledge, BMO and RBC have committed to offering 40% of all summer/student opportunities to BIPOC candidates (starting in 2021 for RBC). On July 17, Manulife committed to hiring at least 25% BIPOC as part of its graduate program (and to increasing BIPOC representation in leadership roles by 30% by 2025; baseline figures were not shared).Collectively, the Big Five banks donated $7.7 million to North American charities supporting Black communities, with some dollars part of existing initiatives. The Vanguard Group Inc. donated US$350,000 to historically Black colleges and universities.Diversity initiativesMost of the 20 institutions we contacted had already established diversity initiatives — not surprising given their size and reporting obligations.Common initiatives included diversity committees and employee resource groups; training on unconscious bias and inclusive hiring, promoting and retention; and recruitment partnerships with relevant non-profits and post-secondary schools.Brent Chamberlain, senior director of inclusion and diversity at CIBC, says the bank’s approach to diversity initiatives has evolved, leading to an upward trend in its diversity metrics from 2017 to 2019.“Partners like Catalyst [a global nonprofit focused on advancing women in leadership] often say that increasing the number of women only took off after we realized we had to stop fixing the women; we had to fix the workplace,” he says. “That’s at the core of our strategy challenging systemic racism.”Girish Ganesan, global head of diversity and inclusion at TD, says leadership accountability is a major factor in the bank’s strategy. “We look at our [diversity] metrics on a quarterly basis with senior leadership, so they know where the successes and opportunities are, and where we need to focus.”TD’s diversity percentages increased from 2018 to 2019, and three of its five named executive officers, including CEO Bharat Masrani, are either women or visible minorities.Crystal Hardie Langston, chief diversity officer at The Vanguard Group Inc., agrees that executive-level support is critical.“Everyone expects the chief diversity officer to wave the flag,” she says. “But without the senior-most leadership team’s [support], this would be impossible to do, and frankly may not register as important.”When Langston was promoted into her role in 2018, she says CEO Tim Buckley “was clear and imperative that nothing we do should be performative.”Kathy Bock, principal and head of Vanguard Canada, says that staff have prominent role models: the firm’s chief investment officer and general counsel are both African-American, representing 16.7% of the named management team.While Vanguard has internal targets for minority representation, it hasn’t yet communicated those targets publicly.Recent events have prompted other institutions to enhance their initiatives. Manulife announced it would spend $3.5 million over two years to build “employment opportunities, training and community support in the workplace and the communities [it serves].”Edward Jones released a four-part statement that includes a commitment to “equitable pay” and a “meaningful increase in diversity among our financial advisors and senior leadership.”Gunn said his firm preferred to commit publicly without first deciding on metrics in order to hold itself accountable, noting that he hopes to have concrete objectives by 2021.Changing the systemExecutives pointed out that finding the best candidate and incorporating diversity into staffing practices are not mutually exclusive.“There’s a clear correlation between diverse teams and their outperformance in their organizations,” Langston says. “Everyone’s better off when there are diverse teams in play. There is better decision-making, better outcomes for clients and benefits for the whole enterprise.”Ganesan says there are still structural barriers to finding the best candidate. Systemic change is needed to level the playing field in terms of access to education, a network and professional opportunities. “Lived experience has never been looked at as a criteria for being able to do a job, but I think it’s about time that it is,” he says.Chamberlain agrees.“We as a country are only going to achieve greatness if we can tap into the potential of all our talent. If we are aware that there are groups facing barriers to entry, it’s our responsibility to investigate that,” he says. “It’s not about lowering the bar, it’s about widening the door. Inclusion is not a zero-sum game.”Executives also acknowledged that eliminating systemic racism goes beyond improving staffing and representation.“Anti-Black racism manifests itself in a number of forms,” Chamberlain says. “Bias also shows up in the education system [and] the broader world of finance.”He says CIBC is working to understand “the needs of our Black clients and working to disrupt any bias that [may] exist in terms of client interactions.”RBC stated in a July release that it will commit to lending $100 million over five years to Black entrepreneurs, and will establish a program to bring business experts and community leaders together “to share ideas and best practices to advance growth for Black-owned businesses.”Langston says her next challenge is helping people take concrete actions toward eliminating systemic racism. She’s received several emails from Vanguard employees asking how they can move beyond awareness, and she replies with small yet powerful immediate actions: ask colleagues how they are feeling about recent events, listen “with the intent to understand and not to reply,” and interrupt bias in everyday conversations, which “could look like asking questions, or challenging a stereotype,” she says.She knows real change requires a long-term commitment. “This work is more nebulous than selling a product or building a client solution — this is a mindset shift in a deep way,” she says.“[We need] to ensure that education continues, and that it doesn’t just happen in the couple of months following the things that happened to Ahmaud [Arbery], Breonna [Taylor], George [Floyd] and countless others.”This article was updated on July 17 with information released by Manulife and Sun Life after this piece was first published.Read another article that addresses systemic racism in wealth management and an article that examines investing options that address racial justice. 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Spieth’s 64 gives him a reprieve from a MC

first_imgSILVIS, Ill. – Through 22 holes at TPC Deere Run, Jordan Spieth looked aggravated and played uninspired. An early exit was a very real possibility and an earlier-than-planned trip across the pond would have been worth consideration. Then he flagged his approach and tapped in for birdie at the par-4 14th. “I had like a 2-footer to get going,” he said. And off he went. Spieth went on a tear, playing a seven-hole stretch from No. 14 to No. 2 in 6 under on Friday. It was part of a 7-under 64 that got him off the cut line and into contention at the John Deere Classic. Quote Spieth: “Solid round when I needed to play well just to avoid going home.” The latter option looked like a real possibility after an opening 71 left him eight shots out of the lead. Spieth admitted after Thursday’s round that he was shaking off a decent amount rust that had built up during his post-U.S. Open break. He took a full week off from golf of any kind to head to the Bahamas and then spent the next week exclusively in the practice area.                Asked what changed from Thursday to Friday: “Just another round of golf,” he answered. “This is the third round of golf I’ve played since the U.S. Open, with the pro-am Wednesday being the first full round and then yesterday. It’s just repetitions. I’m getting on-course reps, and it’s making a difference.” John Deere: Articles, photos and videos The real difference was his putter, which refused to cooperate in Round 1 and then wouldn’t stop pouring the ball in the hole in Round 2. Spieth needed to use it only 25 times Friday, compared to the 31 he needed Thursday, when he missed seven birdie chances from inside 15 feet. He went from 125th in the strokes gained-putting in Round 1 to first in Round 2. Yes, the 2-footer at No. 14 got him going, but it was his birdie make from 24 feet on the par-3 16th that set him up for a run. “That putt on 16 was really big,” he said. “I knew I had a lot of birdie holes left, but I knew I needed to steal one that I maybe didn’t think I could get. And then, obviously, from there, that stretch of 18-1-2 went perfect.” Perfect as in birdie-birdie-eagle. He made three straight 3s, capped off by an eagle at the par-5 second. After finding the fairway, Spieth ripped a second shot from 241 yards that landed short of the hole and rolled to 4 feet. It was his first red number of any kind on a par 5 this week, after turning in two-putt pars on each of his first five attempts. He seemed poised to add yet another birdie at the uphill par-3 third but – at that point surprisingly – missed a putt from 8 feet. It was a miss that nearly stalled his momentum. Spieth, for the second time in as many days, smacked his drive at the par-4 fourth off the tree that splits the middle of the fairway. The ball bounded into the right rough and could barely be seen from just a few feet away. Unable to get any spin on the ball, he couldn’t hold the green. After how poorly he chipped Thursday – it was his short game he spent the most time bemoaning after that round – Spieth seemed poised to give a shot back. Instead, he hit a high flop 4 feet from the cup, sank the putt, and got out of there. Two holes later, following a birdie at 5, he made his worst swing of the day with an iron, pulling his approach from the middle of the fairway well left of the green and nearly into an unplayable area. This time the flop didn’t get nearly as close. Staring at a 12-footer, he made it again. Those two par saves and Nos. 4 and 6 kept what could have been a leaky ship afloat and immediately led to birdies on both 5 and 7. With the putter and the wedge game looking typically sharp, Spieth will need to clean up his play off the tee if he wants to win his second Deere title this weekend. In addition to the mishap at No. 4, he clipped a tree at 17, and wound up lucky to make par after a 180-yard drive. His only dropped shot of the day, at the par-4 eighth, was set up by a wayward drive that required a pitch-out. “I’m still searching for answers with the driver,” he admitted. “My driver is not treating me well this week.” Neither did the putter and wedges on Thursday. And look what happened Friday.last_img read more

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Dail calls on government to reject Mercosur deal

first_img Facebook DL Debate – 24/05/21 Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty By News Highland – July 11, 2019 Twitter Twitter WhatsApp The Dáil has passed a motion calling on the government to reject the Mercosur trade deal.The Sinn Féin motion passed 84 votes to 46 after Fianna Fáil supported it.The Mercosur deal would allow more access to the EU market for South American farmers.Despite the motion passing, the government can choose to ignore it. Homepage BannerNews Google+ WhatsAppcenter_img News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Pinterest Facebook Harps come back to win in Waterford RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Previous articleDonegal reg one of most common avoided by car buyersNext articleGardai searching property in Glencar News Highland Google+ Dail calls on government to reject Mercosur deal Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population growslast_img read more

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Martin Truex Jr. earns first pole of the season in Phoenix

first_imgAVONDALE, Ariz. – Defending Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series champion Martin Truex Jr. finally found the extra speed he needed at ISM Raceway.Saving his best lap for the final round of knockout qualifying on Friday at the one-mile track in the Sonoran Desert, Truex sped around the circuit in 26.288 seconds (136.945 mph) to win the pole position for Sunday’s TicketGuardian 500 (3:30 ET on FOX, MRN and SiriusXM NASCAR Radio).Truex beat Kyle Larson (136.643 mph) by .058 seconds to earn his first pole of the season, his second at ISM Raceway and the 16th of his career. But Truex hadn’t claimed the top starting spot at ISM since he led the field to the green flag in the fall of 2009. Truex said a strong game plan and a variety of factors contributed to the pole-winning run for the No. 78 Furniture Row Racing Toyota.RELATED: Full qualifying speeds | See the full field | Practice 1 results“I think it was a little bit of everything,” Truex said. “I wouldn’t say I held back that much the first two runs. But we really worked on our car in practice to try to be best in that third run and to understand what we needed to do for balance-wise throughout those three runs. Honestly, sometimes you just hit it right, and today all the stars lined up, and here we are. “So many little things come in to play when you’re talking about how to pick up half of a tenth at the racetrack. Just a lot of little things and details that were done properly, and that’s what’s so fun about our team. We work together so well. They can tell me I’m not driving right, and I can tell them they’re not setting up the car right, and we can meet in the middle.”Chase Elliott (136.126 mph) qualified third, followed by Alex Bowman (136.080 mph) and Joey Logano (135.947 mph).Time trials took place two hours earlier than their traditional later afternoon time slot, and Larson thought he had a strong shot at his first Phoenix pole.“Our Credit One Bank Chevy has been really good here the last few years and actually, I’m a little disappointed in second, because I always qualify good here,” Larson said. “I think I’ve been like in the top eight every single time I’ve qualified at Phoenix (except for a 12th-place start in 2015) and still don’t have a pole yet. “I thought today was going to be the day. I thought my first lap was okay, but Martin, obviously, their team hit it there for that final round. Sunday’s race will be fun. Like I said, we’ve been fast here the last few years, so it would be nice to close out the weekend with a win.”Denny Hamlin, Kyle Busch, Jamie McMurray, Erik Jones and Kevin Harvick completed spots six through 10 on the grid. Harvick is a record eight-time winner at ISM and is on a two-race winning streak this season entering Sunday’s event.After laying down the fastest lap in Round 1, Jimmie Johnson failed to make it into the final 12-car round as he’ll start 17th in the No. 48 Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet on Sunday.Brad Keselowski was the biggest shocker of the day after failing to advance to the second knockout round. He’ll start 25th in the No. 2 Team Penske Ford.The red flag was briefly displayed after Jeffrey Earnhardt hit the wall during the first round of group qualifying, locking up the brakes on his No. 00 Chevrolet going into Turn 3. He will start last in the 37-car field.last_img read more

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Most young adults keep in touch with potential ‘back burner’ partners — even if they’re not single

first_imgShare on Twitter Share “Back in my grad school days, I was single and looking to mingle. I’d meet people at the campus social hotspots, trade numbers, and store those numbers in my phone. Weeks and months later, there’d be the occasional text message from one to the other: “Hey stranger how r u?” It felt like the idea was to show some interest and attraction, but not so much for a full-on relationship. Thinking back on those days, I wondered what it might mean and whether I was alone (turns out I’m not). Thus was born the study of back burners.”The researchers surveyed 658 college students about their technological communication, relationship status and number of back burners.Most of the students — 72.9% — said they maintained communication with at least one back burner. Even among those in committed relationships, a little more than half — 55.6% — had back burners.“This particular study showed us that people do spend some effort to maintain back burner relationships using many of the same kinds of strategies they’ll use to keep their committed relationships going, e.g., sending messages of positivity, being open, and sending little notes of assurance. And, as you might expect, people who already have a committed partner do these things to a lesser extent than do singles,” Dibble told PsyPost.“Relatedly, more singles reported having at least one back burner than did those in committed relationships–but over half of the committeds still had at least one back burner. And perhaps more striking, when it comes to average numbers of back burners, committeds don’t differ from singles. This underscores findings from our earlier research showing that back burners seem to be common whether people are single or in a committed relationship.”Single students had about six back burners on average, compared to those in committed relationships who had about five on average.The research does have some limitations, particularly when it comes to the sample used.“The biggest caveat is that our data so far have come only from college student samples,” Dibble explained. “We might expect back burner activity to be most common among younger people, but it’s possible that people in longer-term relationships might do something similar, even if to a lesser extent. We’ve received anecdotal comments from married people who say they can name somebody else they’d likely end up with in case their spouse died. So we definitely want to explore this issue with older individuals and those in long-term relationships.”“We also don’t know much yet about what kinds of things people say to their back burners. We know that communication is required for a back burner to be a back burner (that’s what separates back burners from other romantic prospects that we’re just quietly attracted to). That is, we know that people will expend some effort to fan the embers and keep the back burner glowing (and, as you’d guess, single people “fan” harder than those in relationships do). But we don’t know what they say. This is interesting because what sort of message do you craft to keep someone close enough to maintain the attraction, but not so close as to spark into a full-flame relationship? What do these messages look like that keeps someone in sort of an in-between state?”“We also wonder how attached people become to their back burner relationships, as well as what it might mean to lose a back burner,” Dibble said. “Research shows, for example, that being left out of a computer-based ball-tossing game registers as actual pain in one’s brain. If a back burner becomes suddenly unavailable (e.g., Facebook status changes from “single” to “in a relationship”), does that register similarly on one’s physiology?”Previous research conducted by Dibble suggests that a person who has a number of back burners can still be committed to their current romantic relationship.“People have different feelings about this whole business of keeping in touch with back burners, and whether or not it harms our relationships. In fact, well-established theory led us to predict in an earlier study that the more back burners people have, the less committed they should be to their romantic partner,” he explained. “But this isn’t what happened. To our surprise, we found no association between these two things. What this means right now is, simply knowing that somebody has back burners doesn’t say anything about how committed they are to their partner. This research is still in its early stages, but we don’t see much yet that says we should sound the general alarm.”“It seems the repertoire of human romance goes well beyond dating and getting married in the traditional sense. Back burners aren’t new by any means (remember the “little black book”?), but researchers are beginning to study them only now. Being inherently neither good nor bad, back burners may be another aspect of human connection that serves the bigger goal of helping folks find someone special and develop satisfying relationships,” Dibble added.“Learning more about back burners through research can help us learn more about what are the real threats to our relationships and where we may not need to worry as much. Our goal as always is to help people learn to develop the kinds of relationships in which they can be happy and fulfilled!”The study, “Maintaining Relationship Alternatives Electronically: Positive Relationship Maintenance in Back Burner Relationships“, was co-authored by Narissra M. Punyanunt-Carter and Michelle Drouin. Email Share on Facebookcenter_img LinkedIn It is not uncommon for young adults to keep a “back burner” partner waiting in the wings. According to a new study, most young adults maintain communication with people they are romantically or sexually interested in, even when they’re in a steady relationship with someone else.The study was recently published in the journal Communication Research Reports.“I’ve always said research is me-search, so many of my research interests started as personal experiences that I wanted to learn more about,” remarked study author Jayson L. Dibble, an associate professor of communication at Hope College. Pinterestlast_img read more

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Wreckage believed to be from El Faro cargo ship detected near…

first_imgThe US National Transportation Safety Board says members of a search team have found the wreckage of the cargo ship that disappeared off the coast of The Bahamas during the passage of Hurricane Joaquin.The vessel, with 33 crewmembers, disappeared while sailing from Florida to Puerto RicoThe Transportation Safety Board, said sonar equipment was used to locate a vessel at a depth of 15,000ft.On October 1, the El Faro sent out a distress signal, saying it had lost power and was taking on water.Debris was spotted in the ocean in the days after it disappeared, and one body was recovered.The National Transportation Safety Board said a remotely operated vehicle will be deployed “to survey and confirm the identity of the wreckage”.It added that the wreckage was “consistent with a 790ft cargo ship, which from sonar images appears to be in an upright position and in one piece”.The statement added that if the wreckage was confirmed to be the missing cargo ship, attempts would be made to locate and recover the voyage data recorder.last_img read more

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Donegal company’s anger at seven year wait on aquaculture license

first_imgDonegal salmon producer Marine Harvest Ireland (MHI), has expressed disappointment at the latest delay in reaching a decision on a finfish license application in Bantry Bay, originally submitted to the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine in 2011.The application for a site at Shot Head was last approved by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine in September 2015 but was subsequently appealed to the Aquaculture Licences Appeals Board (ALAB).MHI were among the appellants since some of the conditions set-down in the licence rendered it unfit for purpose and grossly out-of-kilter with international best practice. Having indicated it would reach a decision by October 2018, ALAB has now stated that it is extending its latest deadline until June 30th, 2019.The application is the preferred single licence size for MHI’s organic operations and is smaller than its very successful and well-established operations at Clare Island off the Mayo coast.It involves an investment of €3.5 million which would initially create six full-time jobs during the farm set-up and a further two additional jobs when fully operational.The company would also commission a marine vessel with a local shipbuilder to service the Shot Head site. A spokesperson stated: “While respecting ALAB’s mandate and independence, Marine Harvest Ireland (MHI) wishes to place on record its disappointment that a final decision still hasn’t been reached on an application which the company originally applied for, to the Department of Agriculture in 2011.“Seven years later, we are told that the decision won’t be taken until the middle of next year at the earliest. It sends out a very negative message to the Irish aquaculture sector and doesn’t provide any of the certainty which is necessary for those seeking to invest and create employment in the industry.“Those who end up bearing the brunt of this inaction and suffering most, are our workers who don’t have the certainty and security of regular work because we cannot grow enough fish.“The Minister for Agriculture has been asked to address the serious bottlenecks in the aquaculture licencing system in an independent report commissioned by his own Department which was published in May 2017. MHI and the IFA have asked the Minister to implement the recommendations of the report to break the never-ending cycle of unnecessary delays. As it stands, ALAB is quite obviously under-resourced.“It needs to be given adequate resources to do its job, especially with the Minister putting further work its way by making promises about clearing the backlog of licence applications and committing to the issuance of 300 shellfish licences both this year and next. “MHI has €22million earmarked for investment in Irish sites which would create 250 jobs in rural, coastal locations. Ireland’s failure to meet aquaculture targets set out in various Government strategy documents will result in lost income of €1.3billion by 2020 if no tangible, progressive action is taken by the Department,” concluded the spokesperson.With global demand for reliable sources of quality protein increasing rapidly, Marine Harvest Ireland already contributes over €21million to the domestic economy annually with some 800 Irish suppliers presently doing business with the company here.MHI is a subsidiary of the Marine Harvest ASA headquartered in Norway, it is a global-force in aquaculture with more than 13,200 employees operating across 24 countries worldwide and servicing 70 markets across the globe.The company had a turnover of almost €3.6billion in 2017 and is prepared to invest in market opportunities that offer growth potential. To that end, it has recently approved an £80 million investment in Scotland.Marine Harvest has operated successfully in Ireland for 39 years to employing approximately 300 people between its salmon farms and hatcheries in Donegal, Mayo, Galway, Cork and Kerry. Donegal company’s anger at seven year wait on aquaculture license was last modified: September 7th, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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State of Emergency Declared in Jackson County

first_imgWithout rain and continued severe drought conditions, wildfires continue to burn across Western NC. Emergency Services Director Todd Dillard has called for a State of Emergency in Jackson County. He told WRGC, “all the municipalities in Jackson County have declared a  state of emergency. This has been due to the increased wildfires burning in our neighboring counties.”One of the largest fires burning is the Tellico wildfire, which is now more than 3,400 acres and only 25 percent contained. That wildfire started in Macon County and spread to Swain County where a state of emergency has been declared. Shelters have been set up and are available for people who have been evacuated at the Nantahala Outdoor Center and the Southwestern Community College Almond Center in Bryson City. Residents in the Wesser Creek Road area have been asked to evacuate. A dozen or so families live in that area but most have not left their homes. Some homes are only a few hundred feet away from the fire. Swain County Schools will not run buses on the roads of the affected areas.last_img read more

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Disney Introduces New Frozen Ever After Sparkling Dessert Party

first_imgShare This!©DisneyAre you looking for a new way to experience Illuminations: Reflections of Earth? Beginning July 17, Guests can participate in the Frozen Ever After Sparkling Dessert Party. During this party, Guests will receive reserved seating to the amazing fireworks spectacular, delicious desserts and an opportunity to enjoy Frozen Ever After!  The party will take place in World Showcase Plaza East and will feature snacks inspired by the hit film, Frozen.Buffet items will include: Olaf’s Warm Double Chocolate S’mores Pudding CakeElsa’s Warm Cottage Pudding with Salted Caramel GlazeHand-dipped Vanilla Bean Ice CreamWandering Oaken’s EclaironsHans’ Key Lime Tarts with Red Glitter GlazeLiving Rock Crispy BonbonsAnna’s Blue Velvet CupcakesKristoff’s No Sugar Added Lemon Curd with BlueberrySven’s Fresh Fruits & BerriesGrand Pabbie’s Winter-spiced Snack MixDuke of Weselton’s Cheese Fondue served with Country Bread Cubes, Broccoli, and Grilled FlatbreadAfter watching Illuminations, Guests will then be escorted to the Norway Pavilion for a ride on Frozen Ever After.The cost for this event is $79 for guests ages 10 and up and $47 for ages 3-9. Tax and gratuity are included in this price. To book this special option, Guests can call 407-WDW-DINE.last_img read more

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