Golden Boy accredited

first_imgGolden Boy is the first coach operator to achieve the Confederation of Passenger Transport (CPT)’s Workshop Accreditation.Golden Boy, which conducts all its own maintenance as well as undertaking third-party work for other operators under its separate business GB Fleet Maintenance, has a five-bay workshop at its premises in Hoddesdon, Hertfordshire.The firm underwent a thorough two-day audit comprising 100 questions, conducted by compliance specialist Lloyd Morgan, to be awarded the accreditation.Designed and launched in 2014 by the CPT’s Engineering Committee with support from the Traffic Commissioners, the accreditation assesses coach and bus operators’ workshops, as well as dealer workshops, against a series of in-depth engineering compliance and health and safety-based procedures.Golden Boy is the second operator to achieve the accreditation, after Ipswich Buses (routeone, News, 25 February).Joint Managing Director Geraldine McIntyre tells routeone: “It helps with council tenders to have something like this – something that says we’ve been audited for quality, that we haven’t just signed up to a scheme with no checks.”“It’s another string to our bow,” says Paul Murdoch, Engineering Director. “It helps us to show our customers and potential customers what we’ve got, and what we can offer.”Bill Hiron, CPT President, presented the accreditation to Golden Boy. He says: “I offer my congratulations to the small team here who have worked tirelessly and meticulously over the years to ensure that Golden Boy Coaches is worthy of this industry status.“It’s a selling point for the operator, as it helps to show discerning customers that the company is serious about safety.”“That’s what it’s set out to do,” adds Stephen Smith, Operations Director of the CPT. “The accreditation is for CPT members who offer services to other operators, who can see it’s professionally audited and accredited. It’s reassurance that that CPT member takes their maintenance responsibility seriously. The vehicles are properly looked after, repaired and maintained.“There are quite a few operators considering whether to apply for the accreditation now. We hope that Golden Boy is the first of many coach companies to achieve it.”Click here to see the Golden Boy profilelast_img read more

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Bath Bus takes debut Euro 6

first_imgThe Bath Bus Company, part of RATP, has taken delivery of two new Volvo B5TL double-deckers, the company’s first Euro 6 vehicles.With a passenger capacity of 79, they will be used on tourist routes in the city, where strict operational rules apply. With UNVI’s Urbis 25 half-canopied upper deck for sightseeing, a “significant number” of adaptations have been made in response to feedback received from drivers and operational staff after experience with last year’s deliveries.Bath Bus Company MD Martin Curtis says: “Our team is particularly impressed with the adaptations to the design and layout, including increased cab space, wider entrance doors and changes to the wing mirrors and fuel filler. In particular, the twin-stair/two-door access enables much faster loading.”last_img read more

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Whittles and Wolves basketball team come together

first_imgKidderminster-based Whittles Coaches has partnered with professional basketball team Worcester Wolves to provide transport to its away games. The firm runs nine quality coaches.Based at University of Worcester Arena the team is one of the most successful in the British Basketball League.Whittles Commercial Director John Johnson says: “We recognise that the Worcester Wolves are going places on the court and we are delighted to support them.”Richard Johnson and the Wolves team at Worcester University Arenalast_img read more

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Change to sales structure for global supplier First Line

first_imgFirst Line has announced a new level of sales management to strengthen its position as a global supplier of vehicle parts.Ian Boyle, previously UK Sales Manager, will take on the position of UK Sales Director and Andrew McCluskey, former Export Manager will become the new Export Director. Malcolm Rosher joins the company as Business Development Director.The new level is being implemented to strengthen the business, offering greater autonomy and direction to grow and develop as the company continues to expand.Managing Director, Dan Joyner, says: “Strengthening the sales management team demonstrates the current robustness and future commitment of our company. We want to be around for the next 30 years, so it’s important for distributors choosing suppliers to do so not only based on the cost of a part, but rather on the total business offer.”(L-R) Kevin Neaverson, Ian Boyle, Malcolm Rosher, Andrew McCluskeyFirst Line supplies its products to more than 60 countries around the world, with new opportunities being presented daily with its three brands; First Line, Borg & Beck and Key Parts.Kevin Neaverson, Global Sales Director, says: “This new layer of sales management will enable us to develop the business in new ways and will also benefit our many customers.”last_img read more

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Daimler reveals details of Citaro hybrid package

first_imgIt’s back to basics for the Mercedes-Benz Citaro as its fuel efficiency is improved thanks to a simple yet robust hybrid kit. Not only is it uncomplicated, but there are no training requirements, says DaimlerSimplicity is the name of the game with the Citaro hybrid, says DaimlerA simple, cost-effective and maintenance-free way to reduce fuel consumption by up to 8.5% is how Daimler describes the mild hybrid package that will be available across almost all of the Mercedes-Benz Citaro range from 2018.Although referred to as a hybrid by Daimler, It’s actually a straightforward kinetic energy recovery system (KERS) that has a reasonable payback period.At its heart is a motor-generator mounted between the engine and the gearbox that is connected to a pair of 24v supercapacitors that act as electrical energy storage.When the bus brakes, the supercapacitors are charged. Slowing from around 30mph to stationary is enough to fill them. The stored energy is subsequently returned to the driveline, but in an intelligent manner. There is a also further string to the hybrid system’s bow.Daimler points out that an engine is at its most inefficient when idling. To mitigate that, the motor applies a small torque at tickover, removing from the engine some of the load created by internal resistance and electric auxiliaries. That contributes to a further fuel saving.Despite the differences between the Citaro’s hybrid package and those already in the market with other manufacturers, Daimler has named it correctly. As it points out, the definition of a hybrid in a vehicle sense is one that utilises more than a single power source.Integral to the overall fuel saving are a high-efficiency ZF rear axle and electro-hydraulic steering. Either can be specified individually on non-hybrid Citaros, but they cannot be deleted from examples with the kinetic energy recovery pack.As would be expected from a Mercedes-Benz product, the KERS system is mature and well packaged. The supercapacitors are out of harm’s way on the roof, and there is no impact on space within the cabin. The front-mounted steering motor can be heard at lower road speeds, but that’s it.EvoBus (UK) has confirmed that it expects around 50% of the Citaros that it supplies to be equipped with the hybrid package once production is in full swing. While the 8.5% fuel saving is its headline figure, the manufacturer says that it also results in a 2.5% cut in the total cost of Citaro ownership.The 14kW, 220Nm motor-generator goes between engine and gearboxDial S for SimpleThe motor’s purpose is to support, and not replace, the standard six-cylinder OM 936 engine, although it’s also available in conjunction with the M 936 G gas-fuelled unit.“The support element is an important detail,” says Daimler Buses Technical Explainer Frank Mandel, who adds that there is neither ‘engine off’ capability nor stop-start functionality on the Citaro hybrid.“Support from the motor comes not just when the bus is accelerating. It is delivered to the crankshaft when the engine is idling, because there is still an electrical load at that time.”Peak torque output of the 14kW motor is 220Nm. The OM 936 delivers a maximum of 1,200Nm, but a control unit ‘blends’ the two sources, meaning that no additional get-up-and-go is available on the hybrid compared to a standard diesel Citaro.“This is not an AMG package for buses,” says Mr Mandel. “The torque delivered by the motor substitutes for what would otherwise have come from the engine, and that generates the fuel saving.”To accommodate the motor-generator, the engine and gearbox are split slightly. The KERS package adds 156kg to the unladen weight, but Mr Mandel adds that as all of its components are within the rear overhang, it actually reduces the imposed mass on the front axle.The only alteration within the saloon is a slight extension to a raised area at the rear to accommodate the gearbox access hatch. When production of hybrid examples begins next year, all Citaros – regardless of whether they have the fuel saver fitted – will come with the extended pedestal. That will allow a retrofit of the KERS package to those buses that lack it.Doing so would come at a higher cost than specifying it from new, and no detailed sums have been done in that regard. But if external money became available later in a bus’ life, it may be viable.Frank Mandel: ‘Not an AMG system for buses. It’s about engine support’No training neededAnother of the Citaro hybrid’s plus points concerns the low voltage of its KERS. At 48v it means that no high-voltage training is required for technicians, although the unit is free from a routine maintenance requirement apart from annual visual inspection.The supercapacitor used is not new to the Citaro. Daimler quietly introduced it at Euro 6 as part of its smart alternator package, and a supercapacitor is below the cab floor, where it powers auxiliary items within the bus.The smart alternator set-up contributed to an initial fuel saving at Euro 6, but Daimler has gathered consumption and emissions data from test Citaro hybrids for comparison with both non-hybrid Euro 6 buses and those from the previous emission level.While the hybrid’s principle boast is of an 8.5% fuel efficiency gain over a conventional Euro 6, when combined with the earlier developments there is an even more significant improvement over Euro 5 EEV. In that case, fuel use has been reduced by 18%, while NOx emissions are cut by 83% and particulate matter by 98%.As a result, Mr Mandel describes the hybrid as “nearly emission free.” But significantly, Daimler is clear that it does not represent a transitional step to zero emissions. A battery-powered Citaro is coming next year and a hydrogen fuel cell model will follow it, but diesel forms part of the long-term strategy.On the roadLast week Daimler invited the press to Mannheim to drive two pre-production examples of the Citaro hybrid. Apart from the KERS package, they are standard left-hand drive specification buses. Power in both is from the OM 936 engine rated at 295bhp coupled to ZF EcoLife gearboxes, although the hybrid pack is also compatible with a Voith transmission.In the cab, there are no differences to a conventional diesel: No additional controls and no lights on the dash that illuminate when the hybrid package engages. That’s for a reason, and it means that drivers already familiar with the Citaro require no additional type training on the hybrid. Although the motor’s output replaces a proportion of the engine torque when accelerating from a stop, there is no perception of it doing so.Citaro hybrid has an identical driving experience to conventional busesThe test buses’ gearboxes were set to an economy mode and so progress is made at a more sedate pace than some Citaros in the UK with a more aggressive shifting strategy, but there is no aural evidence of the motor’s support.What is evident is a change in the steering feel. The electro-hydraulic pump works only when required, and at higher road speeds the wheel is very firm.The only point at which the KERS equipment makes itself known is when slowing. Mr Mandel explains that when the accelerator is released, the motor-generator applies a small negative torque of around 20Nm before more resistance is felt as the brakes are applied.A lot of work went into validating the optimum level of energy recuperation when coasting, he adds. “The braking torque is low because we want the bus to drive like a diesel. It is key that the driver does not notice the hybrid package’s presence.”The prospects are…In left-hand drive markets, Daimler expects that most Citaros built will be equipped with the hybrid package once production is established. The economics of bus operation there are generally much different to those in the UK, but other manufacturers have shown that with the right payback period, buyers can justify the additional cost of a fuel-saving system, and early indications seen by EvoBus (UK) are that take-up will be respectable here.The product is well packaged, and while its fuel saving potential is not on a par with some full hybrid systems, Daimler promises that the maintenance requirement will be minimal. That will be welcomed by those who have found the opposite to be true with some conventional hybrids.Daimler has no plans to expand the mild hybrid package to other members of its PCV range. It relies on a modern electrical infrastructure such as that introduced on the Citaro at Euro 6 – and that no doubt leaves the door open to further developments on the best-selling citybus.bit.ly/2AJTl4lrouteone commentThe bus industry outside London has increasingly moved away from full hybrid power as external financial support focuses more on carbon-reducing technologies that can be pump-primed to become commercially viable.Daimler says that one of the Citaro hybrid’s strengths is that it stands on its own two feet already.The exact payback period depends on the application, but with up to an 8.5% fuel efficiency gain from a simple system made up of existing automotive components, it’s likely to rival that of the smart-charging systems that are now industry standard.The market for full-sized single-deckers has contracted in recent years, but in that which remains the Citaro has become increasingly popular. It is already a competent product and the latest development will only increase its attractiveness in its sector.last_img read more

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Increase in demand sees Bolton’s Local Link service extended

first_imgThe Logistics North Local Link service in Bolton has been extended.The shared transport service, which is funded by Bolton Council, will now run from 1600-0900hrs and from 1100-0130hrs, having previously run from 0400-0900hrs, 1300-1800hrs and 1900-0130hrs. As well as Farnworth, Atherton, Daisy Hill, Little Hulton and Bolton (via the Interchange), the service will now also be made available to people in Breightmet.Bolton Council’s Director of Place, Gerry Brough, says: “Logistics North has been a huge success story for the borough. It is a key element of our economic regeneration strategy and has created thousands of jobs.“Its success has led to an increase in demand for this link service. We wanted to ensure that it will meet this demand and continue to be as available and accessible as possible for the people who need it.“We are grateful to TfGM for working with us to enable this to happen.”last_img read more

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AP Interview: Buttigieg discusses his plan to tackle racism

first_imgIndianaLocalNationalNews WhatsApp Democratic presidential candidate Mayor Pete Buttigieg, from South Bend, Indiana, and civil rights leader Rev. Al Sharpton, right, President of National Action Network, hold a lunch meeting at Sylvia’s Restaurant in Harlem, New York, Monday, April 29, 2019. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, Pool) By ERRIN HAINES WHACK AP National WriterPete Buttigieg has a message for white liberals who decry racism: “Good intentions are not going to be enough.”The Democratic presidential candidate and South Bend, Indiana, mayor is combating perceptions that he’s out of touch with black people and will struggle to win their votes. On Thursday, he unveiled his most detailed proposals yet, which he says are aimed at addressing the systemic racism that affects the black community. And he’s pairing that with candid talk aimed at white Democrats.“White Democratic voters want to do the right thing but maybe haven’t fully thought about what that means or what that requires of us,” Buttigieg said in an Associated Press interview. “The reality is America as a whole is worse off when these inequities exist.”Buttigieg, 37, was virtually unknown in national politics when he launched his campaign but has gained ground with a compelling narrative as a young, gay military veteran offering generational change in the White House. He raised $24.8 million during the second quarter, a stunning sum that topped other leading Democrats, including former Vice President Joe Biden and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.But his rise has coincided with questions about his handling of race in South Bend. He was criticized for firing the city’s first black police chief early in his career and has admitted he hasn’t done enough to improve the lives of black residents .Buttigieg left the campaign trail last month after a white police officer fatally shot a black man the officer said was armed with a knife. Some South Bend residents criticized him for being more focused on his presidential prospects than developments back home.Under scrutiny, Buttigieg has been aggressive in directly tackling racism on the campaign trail. In Iowa last week, he shot down a question from a white man who suggested the best way to address crime in his hometown is to “tell the black people of South Bend to stop committing crime and doing drugs.”Buttigieg responded that “racism is not going to get us out of this problem.”“The fact that a black person is four times as likely as a white person to be incarcerated for the exact same crime is evidence of systemic racism,” he said. “With all due respect, sir, racism makes it harder for good police officers to do their job, too. It’s a smear on law enforcement.”In the AP interview, Buttigieg said he’s in a unique position to talk about race.“As the urban mayor who, for better or worse, may be the white candidate called on most often to discuss matters of race in this campaign, I want to make sure that every kind of audience is very clear on where I stand and, most importantly, what it is we can actually do,” he said.The mayor has dubbed the proposals the Douglass Plan . It’s named for black abolitionist Frederick Douglass and modeled after the Marshall Plan, which helped Europe recover after World War II.The plan addresses disparities in health, education, wealth, criminal justice and voting rights. Buttigieg says it’s a “complement” to the push by Democrats in Congress to study reparations to determine how to compensate the descendants of slaves.“This is my entry, as specifically as possible, about what we can do across all these different areas of American life where the black experience is very much like living in a different country,” he said.He said he will promote the plan before both black and white audiences in early primary states, but it’s unclear whether that will be enough to resonate with black voters. One measure of his commitment will be how he spends the nearly $25 million he raised in recent months, including whether he’ll staff up in South Carolina, which holds the first primary where black voters are crucial.Buttigieg has sought to build connections with black voters and recently appeared with the Rev. Al Sharpton and the Rev. Jesse Jackson and at the Essence Fest in New Orleans.Sharpton, who has criticized homophobia, has said Buttigieg could face skepticism from older black Americans uncomfortable with the idea of a gay president. Buttigieg said the most important thing is for voters to get to know him as a person, but he acknowledged the challenges posed by his historic candidacy.“Many of the older generation activists that I’ve worked with in many ways are more patient on some of those institutional questions but have less comfort with the form of diversity that I represent,” he said. “It’s just a reminder that people are different, and you’ve got to meet them where they are. But at the end of the day, what I learned at home politically is the most important thing on a voter’s mind is how is your election going to impact their lives.” Twitter By Associated Press – July 11, 2019 0 316 WhatsApp Pinterest Google+ Google+ Previous articleSouth Bend to share the cost of lamp lighting programNext articleOne of Elkhart County’s “Most Wanted” is in custody Associated PressNews from the Associated Press and its network of reporters and publications. 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AMBER Alert for 16-year-old girl from Crown Point cancelled

first_img Twitter UPDATE: The AMBER Alert for Madison Elizabeth Yancy Eddlemon has been cancelled as of Sunday, August 18, 2019 at 2:30 p.m.ORIGINAL STORY: The Lake County Sheriff’s Office has requested the activation of an AMBER Alert from Crown Point, Indiana.(Photo supplied/Indiana State Police)The victim, Madison Elizabeth Yancy Eddlemon, is a 16 year old white female, 5 feet 1 inches tall, 97 pounds, blonde hair with green eyes, and last seen wearing a black hoodie with white tribal and blue jeans with tears and shin high boots with a black lace choker.  Madison was last seen on Saturday, August 17, 2019, at 9:00 am in Crown Point, Indiana and is believed to be in extreme danger.(Photo supplied/Indiana State Police)The suspect, Alexander Martin Curry-Fishtorn, is a 22 year old white male, 5 feet 7 inches tall, 158 pounds, brown hair with brown eyes, and  driving a dark grey 2009 Chevrolet Cobalt with Indiana license plate number 645RIS.Anybody with information is asked to contact the Lake County Sheriff’s Office at 219-660-0000 or call 911. WhatsApp Google+ IndianaLocalNews Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Google+ Previous articleTesting rules established for Michigan’s hemp crop pilot programNext articleNorth Pointe Road shutting down through November in Warsaw Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Pinterest Pinterest AMBER Alert for 16-year-old girl from Crown Point cancelled By Jon Zimney – August 18, 2019 0 1145 Facebooklast_img read more

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Blair revives old memories

first_imgAt one point during last weekend’s Luxembourg summit row over the status of the new Euro-X single currency group, France’s Lionel Jospin suggested that the text under discussion be drafted in English to make it easier for UK Premier Tony Blair to understand. Blair promptly replied – in French – that this would not be necessary.A version everyone could live with was finally agreed upon, but not before Blair had insisted on putting his case for UK participation in the disputed group with what French President Jacques Chirac’s spokeswoman Catherine Colonna described as a “tenacity” which brought back fond memories of former Conservative British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.Luxembourg Premier and summit chairman Jean-Claude Juncker was apparently interrupted a record 13 times – mostly by Blair – as he tried to bring the Euro-X discussion to a close. As a result, what had originally been planned as a brief ten-minute chat ended up taking five hours. Despite the tense Euro-X exchanges, Blair gave a polished performance at his final press conference as he deftly sidestepped a cunning trap laid for him by a Romanian reporter who asked the UK premier to name Romania’s prime minister – not an unreasonable request given that, what with EU enlargement and the UK’s forthcoming Union presidency, the two men are likely to be in regular contact over the coming months.However, with a masterful display of the skilful politician’s ability to not answer the question, Blair replied that he had just been talking to the Romanian president and gave an in-depth account of what they had discussed.So fulsome was his description of their meeting that Blair managed to avoid giving the premier’s name, or that of the esteemed head of state with whom he had just held face-to-face talks.last_img read more

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Warning signs which cannot be ignored

first_imgImposing a crude model of economic efficiency on all world economies and neglecting the social costs is a recipe for a political backlash.The unintended consequences of many existing policies, such as the Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MAI) or excessive market harmonisation within the EU, could be the re-emergence of the very classical protectionism they seek to prevent.The growth of the far right in many European countries is a warning sign which should be taken seriously by liberal parties, whether they be of the left or the right. It is a warning sign that the relentless pursuit of economic efficiency without regard to enduring human needs and social cohesion produces recurrences of atavism. Rather than confusing globalisation with a single form of capitalism, we should recognise that it requires a regime under which different types of capitalism can coexist harmoniously to mutual profit.However, that means a shift in the dominant economic philosophy which many transnational organisations implement.They see economic reform as always tending to replicate the same practices and institutions throughout the world. That is Utopia. It will always come up against the fact that different capitalisms represent different historical conditions and circumstances today.This is a legitimate criticism of the International Monetary Fund. The IMF seems to have broadly the same solution to what appear to be radically different economic problems, which reflect the specific histories and circumstances of particular peoples, governments and capitalisms.There have surely been enough policy disasters by now, and sufficient examples of such universal prescriptions failing to meet the specific needs of reform in particular contexts, for us to be sceptical of this approach.In Indonesia, it is argued that IMF prescriptions for greater accountability and openness in both the government and the economy were benign since they dislodged an oppressive tyranny. A wooden, one-eyed insistence on the simple Atlantic pieties of free market economic philosophy is a poor basis of thought with which to confront the risks of a Europe in which the radical right is back on the march.These policy errors are rooted in a misunderstanding of the process of globalisation. Today, the term is used to mean what has happened over the past decade: the spread of free markets and the world-wide deregulation of trade and mobility of capital.Some like to think that the catalyst for this was the fall of the Berlin Wall or the adoption by Deng Xiaoping of market reforms in China or policies of liberalisation applied in western countries.But, for me, none of these explanations gets to the root of globalisation, which is the spread of industrial production from its heartlands in north-western Europe, North America and Australasia throughout the world.The underlying historical process of globalisation goes back centuries and it represents the world-wide diffusion of new technologies. Globalisation and a global free market are separate phenomena. The global free market is merely one way of creating globalisation and probably quite a short-lived one at that.A global free market, modelled on 19th century England and the Anglo-Saxon countries in the 1980s, carries with it important social costs and less stability than conventional opinion perceives. Free markets are not self-regulating. They need management, not only to limit their impact on cohesion but also because speculative bubbles can develop followed by devastating crashes. It is true that the Suharto regime was opaque and oppressive, but it is also true that the incomplete transition which has occurred took place at the cost of economic ruin for much of the population, a fact which will make the task of any successor regime enormously more difficult.The misreading of our contemporary circumstances is exemplified by Francis Fukuyama in his famous essay The End of History. He concludes from the fact that the conflict between two Enlightenment western ideologies, Liberalism and Marxism, has ended, so history has ended.In fact, the ending of the bipolar world has not in any sense been followed by global tranquillisation.On the contrary, the classical origins of war and competition, which had always been there even during the Cold War, have re-emerged very palpably and painfully in the form of conflicts over territory, ethnicity, religion and the control of natural resources. If anything, we have seen a return to history.Fukuyama also assumed that legitimate regimes all over the world would be exemplars of a single ‘democratic capitalism’. But there are several capitalisms and, under the impact of globalising competition, they are all mutating. In many cases, globalisation is producing not democracy but weak or collapsed states or semi-criminalised regimes.It is a great error to imagine that the spread of democracy over the past nine years is irreversible. People said that about its spread before the First World War, about Communism after the Second World War and about the expansion of Fascism between the wars. All those predictions turned out to be erroneous.center_img It is not going too far to say that in some European countries there is now a palpable risk that the classically flawed political responses to economic insecurity that we saw in the Thirties, such as scapegoating foreigners and minorities and growing hostility to concepts of freedom, could be reproduced in a different form now.Of course, unlike the Thirties, there are practically speaking no totalitarian regimes in the world and few mass movements, since we live in a period of mass political demobilisation.Yet, like the Thirties, anti-liberal parties, which had been on the margins excluded from the mainstream of political life, are starting to set the parameters within which the mainstream parties frame policy. We are not far from that situation in Austria or even in France, where the centre right is unravelling, and recent statements from the Bavarian Christian Social Union (CSU) suggest that even in Germany, mainstream politicians are trying to appease the far right.This is a dangerous and combustible brew for European countries.Of all the factors which contribute to this, none is more important than mass unemployment. If it were to be the case, and let us hope that it is not, that the first few years of the euro saw a further increase in joblessness, there would be a serious risk that European institutions would become identified by significant sections of the electorate with mass unemployment.This would compromise the capacity of European institutions to respond to shocks. Within the EU itself, attempts to construct a single type of market economy across the continent is a hubristic goal. It either cannot be achieved or the costs of achieving it are higher than is commonly imagined.The European institutions presuppose that a single model of economic activity is appropriate within all the EU member states but, even as it stands now, the Union is exceedingly diverse.It encompasses the UK, which has long had an individualistic and outward-looking capitalism reinforced by 18 years of neo-liberal policies, along with the German Rhine model which, though reforming itself slowly, is still not converging with Anglo-Saxon capitalism, and Italian capitalism which, in the strong role it assigns family firms, is more like the Chinese variant than the Dutch, German or British models.For these reasons, I plead for a different economic model, one which accepts globalisation, is not Luddite and does not share the approach of some Greens, but which seeks to make globalisation work for human emancipation and well-being.The framework for achieving this should be plural, embody different cultural traditions and capitalisms and, above all, should not be confused with the Utopian project of constructing a universal free market.John Gray is Professor of European Thought at the London School of Economics. He has recently published “False Dawn”, a critique of globalisation.last_img read more

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