A Morrell crusade

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

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Inbox: Credit where it’s due

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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What about conservatories in the Part L consultation?

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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Different ways to shorten the skills gap

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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Money where the mouth is

first_imgThe government’s mission to eradicate the UK’s most run-down housing estates by “knocking them down and starting again” took another step last week, with a call to estate regeneration promoters to express their interest in receiving help from the Lord Heseltine-led taskforce set up to drive the initiative.The ambition – to renew the country’s 100 most run-down “sink estates”, as the government terms them – has already proved controversial in relation to its potential social consequence. The prime minister, launching the initiative, made it central to a package of measures he claimed could “end poverty”, evoking a picture of brutal high-rise buildings and dark alleyways haunted by criminals. This bleak image is shamefully in evidence in the architecture of many of the UK’s poorest estates. And as Building reported in January, evidence abounds, too, of the link between run-down, hostile urban environments, and a poverty trap that lays generations of families to waste through a hopeless cycle of low incomes, limited education and low aspiration.But, as we reported then, the picture painted by the government of a fresh regeneration push as a fix to poverty ignores the complexity of the communities it is designed to help. Many contain close-knit social groups, particularly among elderly residents, which offer a source of emotional relief from financial poverty. The question of what happens to these communities as their homes are “knocked down” has so far barely been addressed by the government. Instead, the chair of one lobby group indicated this week, the alarming rhetoric from Whitehall has bulldozed the fear of God into tens of thousands of people.Now, on top of the social consequences, initial fears over the viability of the programme from a developer perspective are also looking increasingly well founded.Some housebuilders, such as Countryside, have welcomed the government’s initiative as offering a potential boost to their regeneration businesses. And it’s easy to see the allure of schemes that, if these regeneration experts navigate their complexities as they have proven they can, will drive a significant premium on selling prices within the developments.This bleak image is shamefully in evidence in the architecture of many of the UK’s poorest estatesBut notwithstanding this, the emerging detail of the support behind the government’s scheme offers little encouragement over the scale of its reach. The £140m seed funding announced by Downing Street – a paltry amount given it is spread over six years and 100 schemes – did at least look to have been supported by a £2.3bn loan package unveiled in the last Autumn Statement, to “help regenerate large council estates” and support “major housing developments”. However, Building was told by the communities department this week that just £290m of that would actually go to estate regeneration – and £150m of that has already been spent. So, we’re back to just the £140m.As well as raising questions over how many schemes can really be kick-started by the government, this funding crunch is also in danger of geographically restricting the projects that can be supported, due to the inescapable conclusion that schemes will need to be largely self-funding. This is possible where there are areas of deprivation close to existing house price hot spots, such as the South-east, but is much less likely elsewhere, as the money made on homes for sale is unlikely to offset the costs of the scheme.So if the government really wants to drive a top down, national regeneration push, it needs to much better co-ordinate its funding and its ambition. It also needs far greater harmonisation of its policies towards affordable housing, given that a significant factor undermining the viability of regeneration schemes is the increased cost its extension of Right to Buy will pass on to councils, who will need to compensate eligible leaseholders on estates before any redevelopment can get off the ground.In the meantime, pockets of regeneration will still happen, and there are other ways in which the housebuilding sector is helping to address the country’s housing problems, such as through developing prototypes for lower cost affordable housing.But there is no escaping the fact that the UK’s failure to provide enough good quality housing for its population is a problem on a national scale. And it’s a problem that will only find a solution when policy co-ordination rather than rhetoric is central to the government’s thinking.Sarah Richardson, editorlast_img read more

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A much needed boost for affordable housing

first_imgThe dust has now settled on the £1.4bn new money announcement to deliver 40,000 homes over the next five years. This means that there will be a total of £4.7bn for affordable homes. Government has confirmed that recipients will be able to build homes of any tenure, including a return to rents at below the 80% of market rents, which is a characteristic of the current programme.The distribution of the programme across the country is eye-catching. London will get at least £3.15bn to deliver 90,000 homes. It has already pressed the starting gun on its new programme, and it’s open to providers of all types, including housing associations, developers, local authorities and public/private partnerships and joint ventures.The GLA has also published an Affordable Housing Supplementary guidance, which provides guidance on affordable housing and tenure splits. It builds on an existing borough viability protocol and aims to provide stronger and more consistent review mechanisms. Schemes with at least 35% affordable housing will receive less scrutiny and hopefully faster progress through the planning system. This is all good news and has been welcomed by the private and public sector alike.The distribution of the programme across the country is eye-catching. London will get at least £3.15bn to deliver 90,000 homesThe sting in the tail is if there is less than 35% proposed. In these circumstances, there will be a full viability assessment; scrutiny by a new GLA viability team; the percentage of the affordable housing enshrined in the section 106; and a review mechanism applied at a number of stages. Not such good news.Registration for the new programme has now opened and the system will be open for new bids from the end of January 2017. There is an ambition to make allocations by May 2017 and to have all contracts signed by June 2017.It is an ambitious programme, but well crafted to ensure the best chances of delivery. The contracts are to be streamlined and there will be less prescription on delivery. If ever there was a statement of intent – this programme sets out its stall.Steve Douglas is a partner at Altairlast_img read more

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Grenfell calls for urgent action, so why are we still dragging our feet?

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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Prangl moves to power new heating plant

first_imgIt has worked on the combined cycle power plant in Mellach, the waste-to-energy combined heat and power plant inLinz.The plant in Linz is being constructed at the location of the existing Linz-Mitte district heating plant and will replace old plants that have been shut down. The upstream waste processing plant is being built on an adjacent piece of land at the tanker port. The power plant is designed to recover energy from around 150,000 tonnes of processed waste and the approximately 50,000 tonnes of sewage sludge generated by the Asten sewage treatment plant annually. After completion, the plant in Linz will supply some 37,000 households with electricity and around 11,000 households with heat.During peak periods, up to 27 devices, including mobile cranes, working platforms and telescopic stackers, have been in utilised simultaneously. A small sample of the fleet on site has been a 500-tonne telescopic crane, a 300-tonne telescopic crane and a mobile building crane. Sudden changes in the installation process have required rapid reactions, says the company.last_img read more

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Dinnadge joins CSS Group as vice president

first_imgThe appointment comes as the group reveals new services related to the global shipping and logistics services for new and used construction machinery and equipment.Dinnadge, who has lived and worked in the region since the 1970s, has joined the CSS Group from Barwil Unitor Ship Service, now known as Wilhelmsen Ship Service.Dinnadge is an alumni member of the INSEAD Business School, Fontainbleu, France and holds an honours degree in business administration. He is married and has four children. He speaks Urdu, Arabic and French.The shipping of all types of cargoes such as bulldozers, cranes, trucks plant equipment, project cargoes and other heavy industrial machinery requires a specialised freight and logistics service provider, considers the company. This is especially important in the Middle East region as infrastructure investment and developments continue to be high demand. CSS is one of the Middle East and the Subcontinent’s largest asset-based logistics organisations and manages purchase orders, ensures vendor compliance and physically consolidates cargo and control bookings and shipments.last_img read more

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Air Partner and An-225 join Japan relief efforts

first_imgThe Paris office of charter broker Air Partner chartered the aircraft to carry 145 tonnes of including blankets, food, water, medicines and respirators from Chateauroux in France to Tokyo Narita Airport, as part of France’s relief effort for Japan. The flight was organised by Antonov Airlines. Additionally, the load comprises a range of specialist equipment for relief teams such as pumps, compressors, generators, dosimeters (which measure an individual’s exposure to radiation), and radiometers (to measure the power of electromagnetic radiation).Richard Smith, Air Partner’s freight director, said: “The aircraft was ideal for the task as it allowed us to move the entire payload in one airlift which was commercially beneficial for the client. Following the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, Air Partner has been involved in assisting the Japanese relief effort from the outset. We flew one of the first relief and medical support teams into the region, as well as their equipment, and this latest flight is part of our on-going operations on behalf of governments, corporate companies and international charities.”Adds Antonov Airlines’ commercial director Valery Kulbaka: “Through our business, Antonov has longstanding relationships with Japan. We share everyone’s concerns for the wellbeing of those affected by these events. The An-225 (pictured below) will play its part in the relief effort.last_img read more

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