You can do it! Goal setting for #GivingTuesday

first_imgNow create your own giving pyramid and think it through. If it feels ambitious but achievable, then it is a great place to start with a first year goal. If it seems too easy to achieve, boost the dollar amount. Too much of a stretch? Dial back.Leverage with matching fundsOne of the most powerful tools on #GivingTuesday is matching funds. Consider identifying a lead donor for your #GivingTuesday campaign who is willing to donate marketing fuel to your campaign engine, with matching funds.Even a small amount of matching fund dollars can provide significant benefit to a campaign. If you can raise as little as 5% – 10% of your total fundraising goal in matching funds, there are simple but effective ways to use this to amplify your campaign. These are a few ways to deploy the dollars effectively: · Match a % of dollar raised up to the amount of matching funds you have. So if you have $5,000 against a $50,000 goal, match $1 for every $10 raised until you reach your goal.· Match the first gifts every hour up to an hourly amount. So, if you have $10,000 in matching funds, match the first $1,000 each hour for the busiest ten hours of the day.· Match only gifts up to a certain amount. If one of your goals is number of donors, rather than just dollars, cap your matching funds at $100 or another amount that reflects your likely average gift.· Match gifts that further other objectives, like donors that set up recurring gifts. In this instance, consider doing a bonus match for a monthly donation, since these are an organization’s most engaged supporters over time. Your goal will be one of the most visible anchors of your #GivingTuesday campaign, so make it a motivator. It should be big and meaningful enough to get people excited to work hard. If it’s too attainable, it will feel like just another day at the office, and it will be hard to motivate your team.Everything you do for the next eight weeks depends on motivation and focus; set that goal today, and start planning your giving party on December 2nd! Party on!If you’re a fundraiser, you’re seeing news about #GivingTuesday everywhere.And the buzz is for good reason – #GivingTuesday is not only the launch of the giving season, but has become an international celebration of generosity. And your donors, prospects, staff and volunteers are likely to be hearing a lot about the big day – from you or someone. So, it’s time to solidify your #GivingTuesday plans.GivingTuesday, when done well, can have all the excitement and engagement of a great party, while building awareness and donations for your cause. It can also carry good feelings forward through the December giving season to boost your overall year-end fundraising efforts.What will make it a great day?Like a great party, the secrets to #GivingTuesday success combine great planning with a little magic. And like a party theme, your campaign goal is the part of the plan from which everything else stems. If you ran a #GivingTuesday campaign last year, you have a benchmark against which to think about 2014. If you’re in your first year, setting goals will be an educated best guess. Achieving your first year goal is where the (Planning + Luck) = Success equation comes in. Dollars are likely to be one of the key elements you measure, but it doesn’t need to be your only goal. These are a few goals to consider instead of, or in addition to, funds raised:· Number of donors· Number of new donors· Number of volunteers/hours (if you are including an activity)· Number of recurring donors· % Participation among key groups – like staffBuild a pyramidEven if you don’t have prior experience with #GivingTuesday, you can do some predictive planning around logical paths to your goals. Giving pyramids are a simple way to add a quantitative element to planning your dollar goal. They let you sanity check your goal by putting it on paper, rather than just guessing.How do you build a giving pyramid? Let’s take one example: Your nonprofit would like to raise $50,000 on #GivingTuesday. If you’re a small nonprofit, just eliminate zeroes from this example.Here is one illustration of how to predict a path to success with a giving pyramid:· $50,000 Goal· 8,500 donors in data file· 255 Donors if you achieve 3% participation (and you’ll definitely attract new donors too, so this should be a safe bet)So how might this set up in a giving pyramid? last_img