Richard Branson delivers dire no-deal Brexit warning

first_img Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May Likebonvoyaged.comThese Celebs Are Complete Jerks In Real Life.bonvoyaged.comUndoPast Factory4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!Past FactoryUndoFilm OracleThey Drained Niagara Falls – Their Gruesome Find Will Keep You Up All NightFilm OracleUndoZen HeraldEllen Got A Little Too Personal With Blake Shelton, So He Said ThisZen HeraldUndoDefinitionMost Embarrassing Mistakes Ever Made In HistoryDefinitionUndoPsoriatic Arthritis | Search AdsWhat Is Psoriatic Arthritis? See Signs (Some Symptoms May Surprise)Psoriatic Arthritis | Search AdsUndoUnderstand Solar$0 Down Solar in Scottsdale. How Much Can You Save? Try Our Free Solar Calculator Now.Understand SolarUndoMisterStoryWoman files for divorce after seeing this photoMisterStoryUndoLiver Health1 Bite of This Melts Belly And Arm Fat (Take Before Bed)Liver HealthUndo His warning comes after sterling hit a two-year low this week, declining below $1.25 yesterday amid poor economic data and political uncertainty. Joe Curtis Thursday 11 July 2019 11:16 am Virgin Atlantic, which recently led a purchase of struggling airline Flybe, has already counted serious losses since the Brexit vote, according to Branson, due to the pound’s drop in value. Main picture credit: Getty Richard Branson: Sterling could hit dollar parity in no-deal Brexit “All our costs are in dollars. Maintenance, plane costs, pretty well every cost is in dollars. And therefore, the bottom line hit of that was £100m a year, say,” he told the BBC. Share whatsapp British GDP grew 0.3 per cent in the three months to the end of May to surpass expectations of just 0.1 per cent growth, data showed yesterday. “The pound was at $1.53 when the referendum took place. The pound today it is at $1.22, $1.23, and the pound will collapse to parity with the dollar if there is a hard Brexit,” Branson told the BBC today. But economists warned of a “deteriorating picture” across UK services as the sector, which comprises 70 per cent of the economy, stagnated. Read more: UK economy beats expectations but experts warn on future growth Sir Ivan Rogers said last month that investors and voters have “underappreciated” such risks, in comments to the Times. Branson warned this would be “devastating” for Virgin brands, which cover rail, air travel, financial services and media, and could lead the company to pull investment out of the UK. Branson’s claims follow the UK’s former Brussels ambassador warning that markets have underpriced the UK’s exit from the EU without an agreement. “It obviously is going to result in us spending a lot less money in Britain, and just putting all our energies into other countries.” Tags: Richard Branson “Richard Branson doesn’t give up,” she told City A.M. “Ahead of the 2016 referendum he was preaching of the economic dangers, if not disaster, if the British people had the temerity to ignore his sage advice and vote for Brexit. A no-deal Brexit could cause sterling to crash until it hits parity with the dollar, according to Virgin entrepreneur Sir Richard Branson. Meanwhile Tory leadership frontrunner Boris Johnson has committed to leaving the EU without a deal on 31 October if he fails to secure a withdrawal agreement as the next Prime Minister. “He was wrong about that. Credibility shattered but undaunted, he’s back on Project Fear mark 2, warning of the perils of a no-deal Brexit. But I doubt if anyone is really listening – except the BBC. Life is moving on.” whatsapp Read more: Richard Branson’s Virgin Orbit to test satellite launch rocket However, Arbuthnot Banking Group’s economic adviser and Brexiter, Ruth Lea, dismissed Branson’s predictions.last_img read more

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Cheap use-at-home ‘wonder drug’ that could prevent Covid deaths moves to trial

first_imgHowever, scientists have warned that its efficacy is yet to be properly proven. Ivermectin has traditionally been used on livestock and to treat people with parasitic infestations, but has been credited with reducing Covid deaths in the developing world. whatsapp Results from initial, small-scale trials have been described as “promising”, though scientists and health officials have warned that further tests are needed. Cheap use-at-home ‘wonder drug’ that could prevent Covid deaths moves to trial The next batch of medicines it will assess includes ivermectin, which has been hailed as a Covid “wonder drug”, The Times reported. Share A cheap drug credited with dramatically reducing Covid-19 deaths has been moved to trial stage in the UK. (Getty Images) Also Read: Cheap use-at-home ‘wonder drug’ that could prevent Covid deaths moves to trial If successful, the drug would be a major breakthrough in efforts to find a medicine that tackles the disease at an early stage, rather than treating patients who are already seriously ill. More From Our Partners Astounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comKansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgLA news reporter doesn’t seem to recognize actor Mark Currythegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comMan on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comFort Bragg soldier accused of killing another servicewoman over exthegrio.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.com “It has potential antiviral properties and anti-inflammatory properties and there have been quite a few smaller trials conducted in low and middle-income countries, showing that it speeds recovery, reduces inflammation and reduces hospitalisation,” Chris Butler, professor of primary care at the University of Oxford and a co-chief of the Principle trial, told the newspaper. Researchers at Oxford University are carrying out a Principle trial programme aimed at finding a treatment that can counteract the disease at an early stage and could be used at home soon after symptoms appear. (Getty Images) Also Read: Cheap use-at-home ‘wonder drug’ that could prevent Covid deaths moves to trial James Warrington (Getty Images) The drug is currently only authorised in the UK to treat skin infection and inflammation. (Getty Images) Also Read: Cheap use-at-home ‘wonder drug’ that could prevent Covid deaths moves to trial whatsapp “But there’s a gap in the data. There’s not been a really rigorous trial.” The drug has been shown to block the entry of viral protein into the nuclei of cells, which could prevent the virus from replicated. Saturday 23 January 2021 4:22 pm Show Comments ▼ Tags: Coronaviruslast_img read more

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Gardentalk – Attacking greenhouse mold and mildew

first_imgFood | Gardentalk | JuneauGardentalk – Attacking greenhouse mold and mildewApril 12, 2018 by Matt Miller, KTOO Share:Garlic poke through the soil at the KTOO Agricultural Test Station and Garden of Science in late March 2018. (Photo by Matt Miller/KTOO)Before gardeners start moving seedlings into their greenhouse, it might be worthwhile to do little spring cleaning to get rid of any mold and mildew that may have accumulated over the fall and winter.The fungus can infest and kill your seedlings soon after being put in the greenhouse.Master Gardener Ed Buyarski said a bleach cleanser would be most effective in eliminating mold and mildew, but peroxide and other household cleaners are much safer.If you use vinegar, then be careful about spraying it around the greenhouse and wear a mask. Listen to the April 12 edition about greenhouse cleaning and garlic nurturing:Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2018/04/garden041218fin.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.As for garlic, Buyarski recommends covering garlic beds with plastic or sprinkle some wood chips to accelerate melting of any snow and warm up the soil.Remove the plastic when the garlic bulbs pop through the soil so they don’t get sunburned.Once garlic get a several inches tall, spray some liquid fertilizer on the leaves to boost their growth.And don’t forget to keep weeds under control since garlic and onions do not compete well with them.Share this story:last_img read more

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Alaska’s ‘him too’ moment: When politicians and allies come with accusations of their own

first_img• Contact the Alaska Network on Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault at 907-586-3650 or online  Public Safety | WesternAlaska’s ‘him too’ moment: When politicians and allies come with accusations of their ownOctober 27, 2020 by Kyle Hopkins, Anchorage Daily News and Greg Kim, KYUK – Bethel Share:From left to right: Former Alaska state Rep. Zach Fansler, his aide Benjamin Anderson-Agimuk and Willy Keppel, who is running for Fansler’s former seat. (Photo illustration by Shoshana Gordon/ProPublica; source images: Marc Lester and Loren Holmes/Anchorage Daily News, Facebook)Before sunrise one overcast morning in 2018, a woman sat in the parking lot of a Juneau urgent care clinic, her head ringing from a ruptured eardrum. The man who hit her was an Alaska state representative, Zach Fansler, who soon resigned from office because of the drunken encounter.Democrats in the region Fansler represented, which includes Bethel and other communities in Western Alaska, chose one of Fansler’s aides to become district party chairman and help select a replacement. That former legislative staffer and district party leader, 27-year-old Benjamin Anderson-Agimuk, is now charged with raping an 11-year-old girl.This is a political district where the U.S. attorney general met with village leaders last year before declaring a national public safety emergency, in a region where Alaska’s sexual abuse epidemic is statistically most pronounced, and more people have died of domestic violence during the pandemic than of the coronavirus itself.In some cases, the same self-professed agents of change are, according to police, also the abusers. Fansler once worked as a legal advocate for Bethel’s domestic violence shelter, Tundra Women’s Coalition, attended candlelight vigils and, as a member of the Jesuit Volunteer Corps, managed a “Teens Acting Against Violence” program. Anderson-Agimuk spoke in interviews about valuing Indigenous women and on Instagram posted calls for the protection of vulnerable Alaska children.“Just because someone puts on a good face in public, that’s almost one of the hallmarks of people who use abuse. They can be very charismatic and manipulative,” said Dr. Ingrid Johnson, an assistant professor and researcher for the Justice Center at the University of Alaska Anchorage.“A third of Alaska women have experienced sexual assault,” she said. For a crime that is often considered an act of power and control, it might not be surprising to see people who seek power in their professional lives to also be among the offenders.Rep. Tiffany Zulkosky, who replaced Fansler and who is the only Alaska Native woman serving in the state Legislature, said the accusations made her realize you don’t know people as well as you think.“It’s really unfortunate that women continue to experience mistreatment and then are also asked to clean up after men who behave unacceptably,” said Zulkosky, a Bethel Democrat who is running for reelection Nov. 3.Zulkosky’s opponent is a man who has been named in restraining orders by four women, was temporarily banished from a village and has been placed under a tribal court domestic violence protective order until 2022.The candidate, former Bethel City Council member Willy Keppel, says all the accusations made in the restraining orders are outright false or rooted in disputes over money and property.“I have my rough edges, there’s no doubt about that,” Keppel said when asked about his own court records and the conviction of Fansler and the felony sexual abuse charges against Anderson-Agimuk. “But I ain’t nothing like them two friggin’ idiots.”Anderson-Agimuk, who is now awaiting trial at the Yukon Kuskokwim Correctional Center, refused an interview request. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges against him. Fansler did not respond to emails, phone messages and Facebook messages. His attorney said Fansler had no comment.Fansler is one of three Alaska state lawmakers who resigned or abandoned reelection campaigns after accusations of harassment, misconduct or assault over the past three years. The former lieutenant governor quit in 2018 when a woman reported he propositioned her in a hotel. The state attorney general resigned in August, two hours after the Anchorage Daily News and ProPublica published an investigation revealing he’d sent inappropriate text messages to a female state employee.Separately, the state’s top elected Democrat, Anchorage Mayor Ethan Berkowitz, resigned on Oct. 13 after admitting to an “inappropriate messaging relationship” with a local television news anchor in a scandal that included a bizarre series of public accusations and a nude photo of the mayor shared across social media. (While the case resulted in yet another Alaska politician felled by his personal behavior, the anchor provided no evidence the mayor had committed a crime as she originally alleged.)Johnson, the university researcher, has been interviewing and surveying survivors of sexual violence statewide for more than two years. Social media support networks have arisen in places from Nome to Greensboro to encourage and protect those willing to come forward, an environment that might explain more cases exploding into view.“As women see powerful men being taken down, like Harvey Weinstein, etc., they start to see that maybe speaking out will do something,” she said.She noted that some of the recent cases that ended the careers of men in Alaska politics were noncriminal, involving harassment or consensual but inappropriate messaging. Nowhere in recent years have the accusations been more serious than against Fansler and Anderson-Agimuk in House District 38, an Iowa-sized area home to about 18,600 people. About a third of voters live in Bethel, with the rest spread across 29 surrounding villages.‘He was asking if I was gonna cry’Fansler in 2016. (Marc Lester/Anchorage Daily News)On Jan. 13, 2018, Fansler was in his first term representing the district and a few days shy of his 39th birthday when he met with friends at a Juneau bar known as the Triangle.One of the people in the group was a woman in her late 20s who’d been on one prior date with the Bethel lawmaker. They’d texted ahead of time and agreed to hang out that night. After an hour at the bar, Fansler and the woman parted ways, but they met up later that night at the hotel where Fansler was living while in Juneau for the legislative session.A transplant from Pennsylvania, Fansler was a Bethel attorney who had served on the City Council and as manager for a popular local sled dog race, the Kuskokwim 300, before his election to the Legislature. A friend had warned the woman that Fansler might have a drinking problem, she said in a recent phone interview. (The Juneau Empire first reported the encounter that followed. The victim is speaking here publicly for the first time since Fansler’s sentencing, though she requested anonymity.)Rep. Dean Westlake, another Democrat representing a rural district that includes the North Slope and several northwest Arctic villages, had resigned a month earlier. Seven women accused him of unwanted sexual advances, and comments and court records revealed he fathered a child with a then-16-year-old girl when he was 28. Westlake has apologized to the women but did not respond to questions about the sexual relationship with the teenage girl. He declined to comment when reached by phone for this story.The 2016 election victories of Westlake and Fansler had helped deliver Democrats leadership positions in a majority coalition in the 40-member Alaska House. The victories were portrayed at the time as a potential sea change in the world of Alaska politics, where more than 57% of registered voters have declined to publicly choose a party but Republicans win most statewide races.When Westlake stepped down under pressure from party leaders, Fansler even applauded the resignation as a necessary signal to survivors.“Hopefully it’s sending the message that this won’t be tolerated,” he told KYUK at the time.His date with the Juneau woman came three weeks later. After the night out with friends, the two went to Fansler’s hotel room but did not have sex, the woman said. Fansler was drunk.“I thought, ‘We’ll fall asleep and we’ll just fool around in the morning,’” she said.The pair kissed but remained clothed, the woman said. Fansler struck the woman on both sides of the head late that night in his hotel room.According to the charges, the woman told police that it felt as if the legislator hit her as hard as he could with both his right and left hands. Her face burned. She heard a ringing in her ears.“He was saying things after he hit me that, like, he wanted to beat me. He was asking if I was gonna cry, but it wasn’t in a concerned way, it was like in an excited way,” she said. “So I could tell this was part of sex for him.”In a charging document later filed against Fansler, prosecutors wrote that, “Throughout the course of the evening, there had been no discussions about the nature of the type of sexual activity Fansler liked, and Fansler had not requested any permission to engage in any sort of aggressive sexual activity.”Later, in a text, Fansler indicated his interest in BDSM, as if to explain the violence. But the woman said she never consented to any form of violent encounter. She said it has been hard to see the event described in public as “a romantic encounter” that somehow went wrong.“A ‘romantic encounter’ is quite the euphemism for someone trying to beat the shit out of me,” she said. “Those phrases don’t really describe how scary it was.”She received treatment for her ruptured eardrum a day later, according to a list of medical expenses the victim provided to prosecutors. (All told, treatment included at least seven visits to urgent care and audiologists for exams and hearing tests.) After police investigated and the case was referred for prosecution, she said she didn’t hear anything for months. “I had no idea what was happening.”Paul Miovas, director of the state Department of Law’s Criminal Division, said he personally contacted the victim in May 2018. One matter that complicated the investigation, he said, was that prosecutors needed to seize the lawmaker’s phone to obtain any messages he had exchanged with the woman.“Care had to be taken to not seize legislative communications that were privileged by law while searching for evidence of this crime, so it was a slightly more cumbersome and time consuming process,” Miovas said.In a plea deal, Fansler agreed to pay the woman’s medical bills as restitution, including visits to an audiologist. He admitted to a misdemeanor count of harassment.“I do not think it was harassment,” the victim said. “I think it was assault.”But she said she did not fight the prosecution’s plan to allow Fansler to plead to the lesser charge because what she wanted most was for him to admit he’d done something wrong.“He left Alaska, he said he was guilty, he paid restitution. That’s what I wanted,” she said.Miovas, the head of the state criminal division, declined to say why Fansler wasn’t charged with assault, citing “work-product privilege” held by prosecutors.“I will note that the case was thoroughly vetted with many very experienced prosecutors and we did speak and correspond with the victim multiple times prior to making any final charging decision,” he said.‘The colonized world teaches us to become aggressive’Upon Fansler’s resignation in early 2018, Alaska Democrats in the Bethel region selected Anderson-Agimuk to become the district party chairman and to begin looking over applications for a replacement.Not only was Anderson-Agimuk a rising star within the state party, he’d helped Fansler get elected by introducing him to voters and campaigning in villages, said Olivia Garrett, a former legislative aide for a House Democrat who first publicly raised concerns about Westlake.“The Young Democrats were very involved in the Fansler and Westlake races that year,” Garrett said.Anderson-Agimuk in 2018. (Loren Holmes/Anchorage Daily News)Western Alaska Democrats, led by Anderson-Agimuk, recommended Zulkosky for appointment by the governor. Like Fansler and Keppel, she had served on the Bethel City Council and in 2008 became Bethel’s youngest mayor at just 24. Zulkosky worked as rural director for former U.S. Sen. Mark Begich and is now communications director for the Bethel-based Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corp.Anderson-Agimuk, nine years younger than Zulkosky, was also raised in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta and was gaining momentum in state and party politics. He’d studied political science at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and, according to his LinkedIn profile, “organized Alaska Native outreach for Begich’s 2014 Senate campaign.”While remaining district party chairman, Anderson-Agimuk worked for Zulkosky as an aide from March 12 to Dec. 14, 2018. He served as her campaign manager when, as an appointed candidate, she had to run for election as Fansler’s two-year term came to an end.Meantime, the regional Association of Village Council Presidents and the statewide Alaska Federation of Natives each bestowed Anderson-Agimuk with awards for youth leadership. He spoke to statewide audiences about his efforts to overcome childhood traumas and succeed in state politics.“I know what poverty is. I know what hunger is. I know what addiction in the family is,” he told the crowd of the 2018 Alaska Federation of Natives convention. “But I also know what love is.”Zulkosky won the district, defeating a Republican challenger. A month later, Anderson-Agimuk left his job as a legislative aide and began working for the state Department of Commerce as a “local government specialist” in Bethel.He continued to serve as district party chairman for the Democrats, advocating on social media for Alaska Native children who grew up in foster care.“Escaping the traumatic situations of my childhood doesn’t take care of anything. If anything, our demons must stare us in the face, telling us, ‘now that you’re comfortable, you have the ability to face us, and take care of us,’” he wrote in a Feb. 6 Instagram post. “This is my responsibility. This is my journey as a Native man in this colonized world. If we don’t take care of what’s inside of us, the colonized world teaches us to become aggressive and hurt our own people.”Despite the seriousness of the charges filed in early April, the case against Anderson-Agimuk drew little statewide attention, arriving as Alaska scrambled to enact emergency measures to slow the spread of COVID-19.But even before the pandemic, 2020 began as a year of heartache in Western Alaska. The FBI arrested a well-liked Bethel elementary school principal in December on suspicion of sexual abuse of a minor. (A Daily News, KYUK and ProPublica investigation found the school district had allowed the principal, who has pleaded not guilty, to remain on the job despite repeated warnings and even prior police investigations.)In the village of Quinhagak, near Bethel, a 10-year-old girl went missing in March. Troopers say she was kidnapped, raped and killed by an 18-year-old. The defendant in that case has pleaded not guilty. Across the region, five people died from domestic violence within a 10-day span in June.Amid the tragedies, on March 5, Bethel police received a report of a 16-year-old girl passed out at a home across from the Russian Orthodox Church.The girl’s mother met a police investigator at the house and said Anderson-Agimuk had given her daughter alcohol and had sex with her. “When confronted, Benjamin just looked down and wouldn’t respond,” the officer wrote in an affidavit filed in superior court. “He told (the mother) that even if he did have sex with her she was 16 it was legal.”Anderson-Agimuk was taken to the police station as the investigator applied for a warrant that would allow him to take DNA samples. Before the warrant could be obtained, Anderson-Agimuk left the police station on the advice of an attorney. When police later tried to find him to serve the warrant, the district chairman could not be found.Anderson-Agimuk’s employment with the state Commerce Department ended a week later.On April 2, Bethel police received another 911 call. This time police found two girls lying on the ground in front of the local library. One girl was 11, about to celebrate her 12th birthday. She told police that she and the other girl, 14, had been drinking and smoking pot with Anderson-Agimuk, and that he had raped her.The younger girl said she’d protected the older girl from being sexually assaulted, according to felony charges filed against Anderson-Agimuk in superior court.Zulkosky said she’d seen no indication he was capable of such behavior and had heard no prior accusations of sexual assault or harassment made against him. She felt a “deep, deep sadness,” she said. “It was just really shocking and disappointing.”After prosecutors filed the charges of sexual abuse of a minor in April, Anderson-Agimuk’s sister wrote in a public Facebook post that her brother, like so many Alaskans, was a survivor of childhood sexual abuse.Anderson-Agimuk has pleaded not guilty to sexually assaulting the 11-year-old. The Bethel district attorney said police referred the earlier March 5 case, involving the 16-year-old, for prosecution and that case is still under consideration.A candidate for office this yearKeppel (via Facebook)Now Keppel is campaigning to represent the district in the future. While he has not been charged with a domestic violence crime or sexual assault, a tribal court in the village of Quinhagak on Aug. 17 issued a protective order barring him from interacting with a local woman for two years.He pleaded no contest to a felony drug charge in 1997 and has been named in requests for restraining orders by an Alaska Native village corporation and four different women, including a woman who told Bethel police he sexually assaulted her. Keppel denied having non-consensual sex with the woman and was not charged after a police investigation, court and Bethel Police Department reports show. The woman who filed the report declined to comment through her attorney.Keppel, who is certified to appear on the Nov. 3 ballot as the Veterans Party of Alaska candidate, said he’s never had sex with anyone without consent.Asked if he has ever committed an act of domestic violence, he said, “Not that I recall.”If you or someone you know needs help, here are a few resources: This story was originally published by the Anchorage Daily News and is republished here with permission. This article was produced in partnership with ProPublica as part of the ProPublica Local Reporting Network.Share this story: • Contact the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 800-656-HOPE (4673) or online  • Call STAR Alaska’s 24-hour crisis line at 907-276-7273 or its toll-free crisis line at 800-478-8999last_img read more

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McKesson reaches $175 million deal with shareholders over lax oversight of opioid shipments

first_img Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED About the Author Reprints Tags legalopioidsSTAT+ By Ed Silverman Jan. 27, 2020 Reprints Log In | Learn More Keith Srakocic/AP McKesson reaches $175 million deal with shareholders over lax oversight of opioid shipments What is it? [email protected] As pressure mounts on pharmaceutical wholesalers over their role in the opioid crisis, McKesson (MCK) agreed to pay $175 million to settle a lawsuit filed by investors who claimed the big distributor failed to properly oversee suspicious shipments of the addictive painkillers.Besides the payout, McKesson also agreed to take several steps to bolster corporate governance, including separating the roles of the chairman and chief executive officer, creating term limits for board members, reforming the board compliance committee, generating board reports concerning complaints about compliance issues, and toughening clawback policies for executives who fail to perform properly, according to the stipulation agreement.center_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Ed Silverman What’s included? Pharmalot GET STARTED Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. @Pharmalot last_img read more

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Pharmalittle: GSK to partner with CureVac on Covid-19 vaccine; Jazz to buy GW Pharma in $7.2 billion deal

first_imgPharmalot Pharmalittle: GSK to partner with CureVac on Covid-19 vaccine; Jazz to buy GW Pharma in $7.2 billion deal By Ed Silverman Feb. 3, 2021 Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Ed Silverman Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED [email protected] Tags pharmalittleSTAT+ Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What’s included?center_img Alex Hogan/STAT What is it? GET STARTED Log In | Learn More Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. @Pharmalot About the Author Reprints Hello, everyone, and welcome to the middle of the week. Congratulations on making it this far and remember there are only a few more days until the weekend arrives. So keep plugging away. After all, what are the alternatives? While you ponder the possibilities, we invite you to join us for a delightful cup of stimulation. Remember that no prescription is required. Meanwhile, here is the latest menu of tidbits to help you on your way. Have a wonderful day and please do stay in touch …AstraZeneca and Oxford University aim to produce the next generation of Covid-19 vaccines that will protect against variants as soon as the autumn, Reuters says. Asked when AstraZeneca could produce a next generation vaccine to tackle new variants, AstraZeneca research chief Mene Pangalos told a media briefing “as rapidly as possible. We’re working very hard and we’re already talking about not just the variants that we have to make in laboratories, but also the clinical studies that we need to run.”last_img read more

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North Korea designates Chagang Province as special zone, possibly to conceal…

first_img AvatarDaily NKQuestions or comments about this article? Contact us at [email protected] Proposal to shift “general markets” to “specialized markets” finds little support among N. Korean leaders The North Korean government has named Chagang Province a “Special Songun (military-first) Revolutionary Zone” and has reportedly created plans to designate the province a strategic region for the military. The region is mountainous, and harbors ideal terrain in which to conceal the country’s nuclear weapons. North Korea has widely publicized its intent to shut down the country’s nuclear program as demanded by the international community. This intent has been exemplified by an event scheduled for May 23 to close its nuclear site in Kilju, North Hamgyong Province, prior to the planned US-DPRK summit. There have been reports, however, that the North Korean authorities are making efforts to conceal the country’s nuclear weapons and associated material. “Designating Chagang Province as a Special Songun Revolutionary Zone was discussed during a lecture for members of the Ministry of State Security last month,” a high-level source in Pyongyang told Daily NK on May 18.The source reported that the “lecturer said that making Chagang Province a strategic foothold for the military in the face of modern warfare is the legacy of Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il […] He emphasized that the project must go forward without any issues because Kim Jong Un was doing it out of respect for his father’s and grandfather’s legacies.” Chagang Province has over 98% of its area covered by mountains. This renders it largely unsuitable for traditional industry, but North Korea has long developed military-related industries in the province for strategic reasons. The province is located on the border with China, and there are reportedly underground tunnels in which high-level North Korean officials, including Kim Jong Un, can escape across the border. There are also archives containing material on the Kim Il Sung, Kim Jong Il and Kim Jong Un regimes in underground bunkers in the region.“Nuclear weapons can be hidden anywhere, but the North Korean authorities have chosen, it seems, a place where even satellites will have difficulty locating them,” a source in Chagang Province said. “Hiding the nuclear weapons and material there also means the authorities plan to store them in a highly contained facility.”The North Korean authorities have already created airtight plans for storage, according to the source. The government is focusing on a plan to strengthen the ideological background of residents in the region to prevent any secrets from leaking to the outside world. The authorities also appear to be preventing free movement in the province as the area becomes fortified. “The North Korean authorities have ordered that an organizational system similar to that used in Pyongyang must be implemented in Chagang Province, and efforts to strengthen the ideological background of local residents so they meet the standards of those living in such a special zone must continue,” the Chagang -based source added.He also predicted that some residents would be expelled from certain areas of the province, stating, “Orders have come down that anyone who spent more than a year in hard labor must be expelled from major towns in the province to the countryside.” “The provincial police’s resident registration department will hold its annual investigation to confirm that each resident is living in the location they are registered in […] Chagang Province will become similar to Pyongyang, where ordinary people cannot gain entry very easily,” the Pyongyang-based source explained.“The North Korean authorities have created a new plan to build checkpoints to control the people, cars and supplies that enter and exit the province. For example, there is a checkpoint to be built on the road that runs between Huichon, Chagang Province, and Hyangsan, North Pyongan Province, that will be under the direct control of the Ministry of State Security.” News By Daily NK – 2018.05.23 11:01am NewsEconomy Chagang Province’s location on map of North Korea. Image: Daily NK SHARE Facebook Twitter News North Korea designates Chagang Province as special zone, possibly to conceal nuclear weapons North Korea Market Price Update: June 8, 2021 (Rice and USD Exchange Rate Only) RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News US dollar and Chinese reminbi plummet against North Korean won once again last_img read more

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Aston Hill mergers approved

IE Staff Toronto-based Aston Hill Asset Management Inc. said Friday that shareholders have approved a series of fund mergers. Shareholders of Aston Hill Senior Gold Producers Income Corp. (TSX: GPC) and Aston Hill Global Uranium Fund Inc. (TSX: GUR) have approved the previously announced proposed mergers of the funds into Aston Hill Global Resource & Infrastructure Fund, an open-end mutual fund. Related news Horizons proposes merger of two cannabis ETFs Facebook LinkedIn Twitter The last day for trading of the shares of the funds on the Toronto Stock Exchange will be March 28. The mergers are expected to be completed on April 4. Aston Hill is a wholly owned subsidiary of Aston Hill Financial Inc. (TSX: AHF). Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Keywords Fund mergers,  Closed-end fundsCompanies Aston Hill Financial Inc. New portfolios from IG Wealth Management CI Investments announces 30 fund mergers read more

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Boswell to head Competition Bureau crime division

first_img Facebook LinkedIn Twitter TD getting new head of private wealth, financial planning He initially served as associate deputy commissioner of the CMB, and later became the acting senior deputy commissioner of competition of the CMB when John Pecman was appointed as interim commissioner of competition in September 2012. At the OSC, Boswell represented staff of the commission both at its own hearings and before various courts; and provided legal advice on all aspects of enforcement, including the use of investigatory powers and tools. He was also previously an assistant crown attorney in Ontario, handling criminal prosecutions; and he has been in private practice as a civil and criminal defence litigation counsel, with a focus on regulatory and criminal matters. “I am very pleased that Matthew has accepted the position of senior deputy commissioner as he will bring a wealth of legal expertise in criminal law enforcement and regulatory matters, as well as litigation experience,” noted Pecman. Related news Share this article and your comments with peers on social media A former enforcement lawyer at the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) has been appointed to head the criminal division at the Competition Bureau, the federal agency announced Wednesday. Matthew Boswell has been appointed senior deputy commissioner of competition of the Criminal Matters Branch (CMB) at the competition regulator. Boswell first joined the Competition Bureau in January 2011 on a two-year secondment from the OSC, taking a leave of absence from his position as senior litigation counsel for the enforcement branch. center_img Keywords AppointmentsCompanies Competition Bureau PenderFund names new SVP for investments James Langton CETFA elects new board leaderlast_img read more

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Ontario launches consultation on financial planning

first_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news Expert Committee’s final report recommends new rules for advisors, financial planners James Langton Call for standards Ontario one step closer to regulating financial planners Keywords Financial planning,  Fxpert committee center_img Expert Committee’s proposed rules could have far-reaching implications The committee also asks for input on the regulation of planning, and whether proficiency, the use of titles, and compensation, among other things should be explicitly regulated; and, on the legal standards that should govern conflicts of interest.Lastly, the paper asks whether consumers should have access to a central registry of information on firms and individuals that engage in financial planning, including information on their complaint or discipline histories.“We are constantly looking for ways to protect consumers and strengthen our financial services sector. While many financial services are regulated, financial advisory and financial planning activities are not subject to comprehensive regulatory oversight. The work of the expert committee will ensure that regulatory oversight is being properly applied to this important sector and that Ontarians are protected, said, Charles Sousa, minister of finance.Ontarians can provide feedback online or in writing by Aug. 31. The expert committee is supposed to produce recommendations to the government in 2016.Earlier this year, the Ontario government named a four person committee to lead these consultations, headed by lawyer Malcolm Heins. The committee also includes professor Anita Anand; long-time industry executive and regulator Paul Bates; and former securities lawyer Lawrence Haber. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Ontario commits to move forward on regulating financial planners The expert committee that is reviewing the regulation of financial planning in Ontario launched formal consultations on Thursday with the release of a paper calling for input on whether everything from conflicts to compensation should be regulated.In the consultation paper, the expert committee seeks feedback on the appropriate definition of financial planning, and how planning differs from advice. last_img read more

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