More than 2 GW-AC of solar PV under construction in Chile

first_imgMore than 2 GW-AC of solar PV under construction in ChileChile’s Center for Renewable Energy has put out its latest report, which documents the dramatic growth of solar PV in the nation. Chile is easily the leading Latin American solar market at present, but is set for a slow-down in coming years. August 18, 2015 pv magazine staff Finance Installations Markets Markets & Policy Share On Tuesday, Chile’s Center for Renewable Energy (CER) published its August report (in Spanish), which shows ongoing, rapid growth in Latin America’s largest solar market. Chiefly, CER figures show 2.09 GW-AC of solar PV currently under construction, representing 88% of the capacity of “non-conventional” renewable energy (ERNC) being built. ERNC is a term used in Chile that explicitly excludes large hydroelectric plants. Additionally, CER reports that concentrating solar power (CSP) makes up 4% of the 2.378 GW-AC of ERNC being built. Abengoa officially began construction of Latin America’s first commercial-scale CSP project during July 2014, the 110 MW-DC Cerro Dominador in Northern Chile. GTM Research estimates the amount of PV under construction at only 2.1 GW-DC (1.6 GW-AC), however Senior Solar Analyst Adam James notes that his company’s criteria for classifying projects involves additional verification. He estimates that Chile will install an unprecedented 1.1 GW-DC of solar PV over the course of 2015, making it the seventh-largest PV market globally. “Market growth in 2015 is coming from a range of sources, with solar projects competitive in the merchant electricity market, in the bilateral contract market with commercial consumers, and in the government’s tender processes,” notes James. James expects Chile’s market to decline in 2016, citing “broader electricity market conditions.” However, he also expects solar to feature prominently in government auctions. According to CER, new renewable energy capacity may already be bringing down costs. The agency’s report finds a decline both annually and month-over-month in costs on both the SIC and Northern Grid (SING). Overall, CER estimates that ERNC represented 10% of the nation’s electricity generation in July, with PV representing 1.5% of overall power produced. In June, ERNC produced more than double the amount of electricity required under law. And when all of the PV and CSP currently under construction is completed, these figures will be much higher. Update: This article was updated at 15:00 EST on August 18 to feature a quote from GTM Research. 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Florida Regulators Reject Cost Recovery Plan for Turkey Point Nuclear Build

first_img Suitors for halted Bellefonte nuclear project ask TVA to consider climate in reviving sale Previous articleWorld’s First Floating Wind Farm Begins OperationsNext articleMediator Trying to Find Solution to Wind Energy Dispute chloecox Twitter Optimizing Plant Performance: The April POWERGEN+ series activates today Facebook New Jersey utility regulators extend zero-carbon breaks for PSEG nuclear power plants Florida Regulators Reject Cost Recovery Plan for Turkey Point Nuclear Build The Florida Public Service Commission has rejected a $49 million cost recovery proposal for continued development of the Turkey Point Nuclear expansion. By Editors of Power Engineering By a 4-1 vote, the commission ruled Florida Power & Light does not have a required feasibility analysis to show the two new reactors will benefit customers, and that the utility cannot collect costs incurred after 2016, the Palm Beach Post reported. NuclearNew ProjectsReactors Linkedincenter_img Twitter Development of the 2,200-MW Turkey Point Units 6 and 7, originally proposed in 2006, has stalled in recent years, with FPL asking for a deferral in its required annual financial analysis in 2015, 2016 and this year. As of August, FPL has spent $315 on the development of the new units, with another $90 million to be spent during the next five years. The total estimated cost of the project is $17.8 billion. By chloecox – 10.18.2017 Facebook TAGSFPL If built, the project would use two AP-100 reactors from Westinghouse, which has filed for bankruptcy and exited nuclear construction. Linkedin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR No posts to displaylast_img read more

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AP Interview: Buttigieg discusses his plan to tackle racism

first_imgIndianaLocalNationalNews WhatsApp Democratic presidential candidate Mayor Pete Buttigieg, from South Bend, Indiana, and civil rights leader Rev. Al Sharpton, right, President of National Action Network, hold a lunch meeting at Sylvia’s Restaurant in Harlem, New York, Monday, April 29, 2019. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, Pool) By ERRIN HAINES WHACK AP National WriterPete Buttigieg has a message for white liberals who decry racism: “Good intentions are not going to be enough.”The Democratic presidential candidate and South Bend, Indiana, mayor is combating perceptions that he’s out of touch with black people and will struggle to win their votes. On Thursday, he unveiled his most detailed proposals yet, which he says are aimed at addressing the systemic racism that affects the black community. And he’s pairing that with candid talk aimed at white Democrats.“White Democratic voters want to do the right thing but maybe haven’t fully thought about what that means or what that requires of us,” Buttigieg said in an Associated Press interview. “The reality is America as a whole is worse off when these inequities exist.”Buttigieg, 37, was virtually unknown in national politics when he launched his campaign but has gained ground with a compelling narrative as a young, gay military veteran offering generational change in the White House. He raised $24.8 million during the second quarter, a stunning sum that topped other leading Democrats, including former Vice President Joe Biden and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.But his rise has coincided with questions about his handling of race in South Bend. He was criticized for firing the city’s first black police chief early in his career and has admitted he hasn’t done enough to improve the lives of black residents .Buttigieg left the campaign trail last month after a white police officer fatally shot a black man the officer said was armed with a knife. Some South Bend residents criticized him for being more focused on his presidential prospects than developments back home.Under scrutiny, Buttigieg has been aggressive in directly tackling racism on the campaign trail. In Iowa last week, he shot down a question from a white man who suggested the best way to address crime in his hometown is to “tell the black people of South Bend to stop committing crime and doing drugs.”Buttigieg responded that “racism is not going to get us out of this problem.”“The fact that a black person is four times as likely as a white person to be incarcerated for the exact same crime is evidence of systemic racism,” he said. “With all due respect, sir, racism makes it harder for good police officers to do their job, too. It’s a smear on law enforcement.”In the AP interview, Buttigieg said he’s in a unique position to talk about race.“As the urban mayor who, for better or worse, may be the white candidate called on most often to discuss matters of race in this campaign, I want to make sure that every kind of audience is very clear on where I stand and, most importantly, what it is we can actually do,” he said.The mayor has dubbed the proposals the Douglass Plan . It’s named for black abolitionist Frederick Douglass and modeled after the Marshall Plan, which helped Europe recover after World War II.The plan addresses disparities in health, education, wealth, criminal justice and voting rights. Buttigieg says it’s a “complement” to the push by Democrats in Congress to study reparations to determine how to compensate the descendants of slaves.“This is my entry, as specifically as possible, about what we can do across all these different areas of American life where the black experience is very much like living in a different country,” he said.He said he will promote the plan before both black and white audiences in early primary states, but it’s unclear whether that will be enough to resonate with black voters. One measure of his commitment will be how he spends the nearly $25 million he raised in recent months, including whether he’ll staff up in South Carolina, which holds the first primary where black voters are crucial.Buttigieg has sought to build connections with black voters and recently appeared with the Rev. Al Sharpton and the Rev. Jesse Jackson and at the Essence Fest in New Orleans.Sharpton, who has criticized homophobia, has said Buttigieg could face skepticism from older black Americans uncomfortable with the idea of a gay president. Buttigieg said the most important thing is for voters to get to know him as a person, but he acknowledged the challenges posed by his historic candidacy.“Many of the older generation activists that I’ve worked with in many ways are more patient on some of those institutional questions but have less comfort with the form of diversity that I represent,” he said. “It’s just a reminder that people are different, and you’ve got to meet them where they are. But at the end of the day, what I learned at home politically is the most important thing on a voter’s mind is how is your election going to impact their lives.” Twitter By Associated Press – July 11, 2019 0 316 WhatsApp Pinterest Google+ Google+ Previous articleSouth Bend to share the cost of lamp lighting programNext articleOne of Elkhart County’s “Most Wanted” is in custody Associated PressNews from the Associated Press and its network of reporters and publications. 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Harvard, Cambridge establish Joint Center for History and Economics

first_imgCrossing academic disciplines and the Atlantic Ocean, the Harvard University Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) and King’s College, Cambridge, have established the Joint Center for History and Economics (JCHE). The JCHE will facilitate and encourage interdisciplinary research and learning in the social sciences and the humanities.The Centre for History and Economics was established at King’s College in 1991. With the creation of the counterpart center at Harvard, these two leading research institutions will have the opportunity to exchange ideas and engage in mutually beneficial scholarly collaboration.“The Joint Center for History and Economics represents an exciting opportunity to explore the connections between the two academic disciplines, ” says Emma Rothschild, who co-founded the Centre at King’s College. The JCHE will make it possible for two world-renowned research institutions to engage in an exciting and productive relationship, and will provide a location for research students and leading scholars in the field to participate in a rigorous dialogue.Rothschild, one of the leading historians of the Enlightenment, has been a visiting professor of history at Harvard since 2004, and will join the Harvard faculty as a professor of history in July 2007. Rothschild will serve as the founding director of the JCHE at Harvard (see professorship announcement, this page).The JCHE will undertake substantial research projects focused on academic concerns within history and economics, including the history of economic and social thought, the application of economic concepts to historical problems, and the use of historical insights in economic analysis. The collaboration will also result in workshops, seminars, and exchanges of faculty and graduate students.The Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University and the Centre for History and Economics at King’s College have previously participated in cooperative research programs and academic exchanges. Since 2004, they have collaborated on the research project “Exchanges of Economic and Political Ideas since 1760,” supported by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This project is focused on political, economic, and social connections across national borders, and is concerned both with Atlantic history and with the history of Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean.Recent research projects at King’s College include “Globalization in Historical Perspective,” “The Rise and Fall of Historical Political Economy,” and “Religion and the Political Imagination,” which examines the historical foundations of political assumptions about universal secularization. Other research topics include global security across national borders, with a particular focus on the history of the United Nations.The JCHE will be administered from both sides of the Atlantic. The overall direction of the JCHE will be determined by a joint management committee, and executive oversight committees in both Cambridge, England, and Cambridge, Mass. Each committee will have responsibility for initiation and guidance of the activities of its own center. The Web site for the JCHE will be hosted on the Web sites for King’s College and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University.last_img read more

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Children Get Toys from Santa in Event Honoring Slain FDNY EMT Yadira Arroyo

first_imgYadira Arroyo (Photo/FDNY) John Annese New York Daily News Arroyo, a 14-year veteran, was killed by a career criminal who stole her ambulance and struck her with it on March 16, 2017 in Soundview. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. “We were supposed to do this between 2 and 5:30. By 1 o’clock the lines were around the corner, so we started right away,” said former EMS union head Israel Miranda, who helped organize the annual event and lined up an anonymous angel donor. “I think the reason the weather was so good was because she was looking down on it, I really do,” Miranda said. ___ Visit New York Daily News at www.nydailynews.com (MCT) Pandemic or not, Santa Claus delivered thousands of toys to children in the Bronx — all in the name of slain FDNY EMT Yadira Arroyo. (c)2020 New York Daily News Arroyo’s family members dressed like Santa and Mrs. Claus and handed out toys to more than 2,000 children who lined up with their families outside the playground named after the heroic first responder Wednesday afternoon.last_img read more

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Howard Hall hosts annual Totter for Water

first_imgNew students on campus might wonder why there will be a teeter totter in the middle of South Quad on Thursday and Friday. Each fall, the women of Howard Hall spend 24 hours riding the totter to help raise money for projects dedicated to clean water access in communities across the globe as part of the dorm’s annual Totter for Water event.At 6 p.m. Thursday, Howard’s residents will begin taking shifts operating the totter and continue their work throughout the night. Students will have the opportunity to ride the totter if they desire and are encouraged to help Howard in their fundraising goals. This year, sophomores Eileen Leach and Sarah Walters are planning the event.Leach and Walters said the dorm is hoping to raise $25,000 at this year’s event — about $7,000 more than last year. To accomplish such a task, they began the planning process before they arrived to campus.“Sarah and I have been working on the project for several weeks now, we contacted the organization, made t-shirt designs and poster designs,” Leach said.Students working on the event attempt to involve all members of the Notre Dame community. The money Howard fundraises comes from student donations on the day of the event, from both online donations and from selling succulents on South Quad. Anyone interested in donating can give to the cause on the Student Shop ND website. There will also be other forms of entertainment on Thursday night, Leach said.“This year we are having a bouncy house on Thursday as well,” she said.Leach explained that all of the money Howard raises from the event this year will benefit a community in Ecuador.“In the past the money has gone to build wells or develop water systems for schools,” she said. “We have worked with Engineers without Borders in the past and that’s also who we’re working with this year — the Notre Dame chapter. They are going to be traveling to San Pedro de Suma, Ecuador, to build a water chlorination system, specifically for a school in the region.”Sophomore Catherine Connell said she participated last year after noticing the presence of a seesaw on the quad.“I saw a teeter totter on South Quad, so some friends and I went to see what was going on,” she said. “We ended up riding the totter and buying succulents. It was a fun opportunity to break from studying and also help a good cause.”Alix Basden, a Howard sophomore who said she will be riding the totter at midnight, said the event helps the dorm grow in community.“Howard is the single most intentional community I have ever been a part of,” she said. “It is a strong sisterhood. [With Totter], we create an international community and partnership.”For instance, last year Basden shared her totter shift with someone she didn’t know particularly well at the time. Now, that situation has changed.“It’s pure fun to be out on that seesaw,” Basden said. “Last year, I did the 1 a.m. shift. I went to the Totter with a girl I wasn’t that close with at the time, and we rode the Totter for 30 minutes together. Now she’s my roommate.”Tags: Community, ecuador, Howard Hall, totter for waterlast_img read more

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EB17: DT Swiss fills out 2018 Road Revolution with Cross & Track updates

first_imgDT Swiss started a Road Revolution campaign to completely revamp their road wheel line ups almost a year ago with the introduction of the Endurance ERC 1100 wheels developed in the wind tunnel with SwissSide. Next came the Aero focused make-over topped by the ARC 1100 wheels and the Performance all rounder race wheels with the PRC 1400. Just two segments remained Cyclocross and Track, so DT has revamped the C & T series wheels to finish off the overhaul.#RoadRevolution18While the new Endurance & Aero categories were all about developing the newest integrated tech and most aerodynamic solutions for their segments, the overhaul of the rest of the road line has put a lot of effort into better defining a structure and intended use for each road wheel offered.Road Revolution breakdownThe new five categories each have their target use type, their own rim internal width & ideal tire width range. The each identify design priorities that mesh with those use groups.Another key point is a unified naming convention. While the previous names were all over the place making is just as difficult for a consumer to know what they were getting as it was for a product manager trying to decide on an OEM spec wheel on a new bike.Now every road wheel name starts with the first letter of one of the five categories, then a more ‘race’ wheel will add on an ‘R’ and a carbon rim will add a ‘C’. The numbers then denote the hubs, with 1100 getting SINC ceramic bearings in a top-level low-profile Dicut hub (based on 180s), 1400 getting steel bearings in the same hub shell (based on 240s), 1600 stepping down to the machined hubs still with star ratchet internals from the 350s, and 1800 dropping to hubs with a classic 3-pawl engagement. With that you can sus out the full spec details, just from the name of the wheel.Cross Roadcourtesy DT SwissDT is calling the cyclocross segment Cross Road in part because so many of the wheels they build are just as likely to end up on a gravel or adventure bike, as they would on an actual cyclocross bike. While we look at their Endurance wheels like the ERC 1100 as being gravel capable (and have gotten them plenty dirty along the way),  gravel riding officially falls into the Cross Road category according to DT.CR 1600 Spline 23Cross Road wheels are “inspired by the tough world of cyclocross” but really open for any kind of mixed-surface riding you might task a 700c wheelset of tackling. Dirt roads, muddy forest paths, even singletrack.1600 hubFor the time being Cross Road gets just two wheelsets – the CR 1600 Spline & C 1800 Spline – which use the same 23mm deep aluminum rim, now 22mm wide inside/26mm outside.C 1800 Spline 23The difference is the hub internals, with the star ratchet CR 1600s selling for $762/578€ from 1728g, and the classic 3-pawl C 1800s retailing for $538/408€ from 1745g.1800 hubBoth wheelsets are disc brake only and tubeless ready. Currently there are no carbon Cross Road wheels, nor are there any tubulars. But we’ve talked with DT Swiss about those gaps, and they seemed cagey on details, but it is pretty clear that they are working on more new wheels to fill out the category now that the whole update of the road wheel structure is finalized.TrackTRC 1400 Dicut 65Track keeps it simple. At the top end these are wheels destined to spend their life leaning into banked left turns on the velodrome, whether that is smooth wood inside or deteriorating concrete outside. The rise of fixed gear crit racing has also supported the continued growth of top-level fixed racing off of the velodrome, but still on track wheels.Then rounding out the lower end of the Track family is the continued need for urban fixed gear and singlespeed bikes searching for the deep track look, but in a more affordable & reasonable wheelset for rolling through city streets.T 1800 Classic 32There are just two dedicated new track wheels as well – the TRC 1400 Dicut & T 1800 Classic. In fact the premium TRC wheels are available in either $2857/2168€ clinchers (1698g) or $2672/2028€ tubulars (1528g) both in a 65mm deep carbon rim profile borrowed directly from the PRC wheels and fixie hubs based on 240s. The T 1800 Classic sticks with a 32mm deep, 18mm internal tubeless-ready alloy rim for a $630/478€ pricetag and life on the streets at 1896g.DTSwiss.comlast_img read more

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How ignoring mobile device security increases your risk

first_imgEnticed by the promise of increased performance and employee flexibility, financial institutions are rightfully beginning to allow employees to bring personally-owned devices into the workplace. Moving into the fully mobile workforce era, we see the trend continue to move into the hands of the consumer. While controlling the enterprise used to be a fairly simple endeavor, financial institutions are now faced with a never-ending onslaught of devices that are smaller, faster and more capable than even the computers sitting on the desktop. Without effective risk strategies, this poses a significant threat to any financial institution that allows Bring Your Own Devices (BYOD) into their environment.Recent Forrester Research studies show that three out of four professionals use personal devices to access corporate data, with 53 percent of all employees bringing some sort of personally-owned device to work each day. Combine that with the statistics that show over 70 million mobile devices are lost or stolen each year, with about 46 percent of devices in the workplace being completely unmanaged, it is clear that we have a very large problem.First, let’s fully understand the risks. Today’s typical smartphones are not just phones. They are cameras, voice recorders, scanners, calendars, clocks, navigation systems, gambling devices, portable movie theatres, bookstores, magazine racks, games, and computers. The major issue is that the company’s data is now being stored and transmitted using these devices that the employer does not control, which is sometimes in direct conflict with governmental regulations and recommendations that ask us to carefully protect the privacy and security of sensitive, personal and financial information.New software, known as Mobile Device Management (MDM) can assist with these risks, and amidst this extreme mobile era, should be considered a mandatory first step if you allow personally-owned devices to have access to your corporate data or network. But equally important, a comprehensive review of policies and procedures is needed to ensure that not only are employees required to behave correctly in respect to protecting this data, but also to protect the company from employee litigation. Many financial institutions are finding gaps in policies and procedures regarding appropriate use of technology because the rules were based on the functionality of devices that existed when the policies and procedures were initially drafted. Policies and procedures should no longer be specific to just the hardware being used, but also should address the broad range of activities for which these devices can be used.We have to keep in mind that not only do we have issues with keeping our corporate and clients’ data safe, but we also now have the added issue of these devices being used for both personal and work purposes. This opens financial institutions to risk not just from loss of company data, but also to litigation risk from employees who have expectations of privacy on a device that is owned by them. The U.S. courts have consistently held up employees’ rights when employers have attempted to gain access to an employee’s personal device. This has implications for record management regulations, privacy of employee data, overtime for employees using a dual-use device, and access to the employee’s device during litigation holds and investigations.In order to adequately mitigate the risks associated with BYOD programs, we of course first need to implement strong technical controls using MDM software. This software generally covers device restrictions, encryption, strong passwords and the ability to locate the device and remotely wipe the data from it. But we also need to move beyond simple technical controls and develop a full RiskManagement program around BYOD.
At a minimum, action items should include:Implement MDM software with strong technical controls.Develop employee agreements that cover not only the acceptable use of the device, but also reserve the right of the institution 
to access or wipe the device as needed.Implement operating procedures that ensure all devices are indeed covered and are being used appropriately.Develop and deliver mandatory employee training to teach employees how they should handle the loss or theft of the device 
and covers the aforementioned policies.Develop a risk management approach to mobile device security.Policies that will likely need to be modified to successfully mitigate risk are:Employee AgreementsAcceptable Use PoliciesCompliance and Ethics PoliciesData Privacy and Security PoliciesRecords Management PoliciesLitigation Hold PoliciesConfidentiality PoliciesEntering into the Bring Your Own Device era can be dangerous territory, but with a strong risk management approach and appropriate technical tools, it is possible to achieve the promise of increased employee productivity while mitigating the risks associated with mobile devices.D+H provides several tools to assist in creating a solid Mobile Device Management program Compushare C3 and Compushare Mobile Device Management. 57SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Karn Griffen Karn Griffen leads the architecture team for the Compushare suite of products at D+H. Under Griffen’s lea dership, his team provides design and development expertise for the cloud … Web: www.dh.com Detailslast_img read more

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Here’s An Easy Way To Improve Your Writing Immensely

first_imgBusiness Insider Australia: Great writing requires clear thinking. Just ask Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon. “There is no way to write a six-page, narratively structured memo and not have clear thinking,” he has said. Writing, even though you’re most likely a long way removed from your college essay days, remains a key skill for success.Which is what makes new research out of George Mason University relevant to you. Something that you are probably doing every day is making you a much worse writer than you otherwise would be, the findings revealed.What is this simple activity that severely dips your writing skill? Simple, everyday interruptions.Read the whole story: Business Insider Australia More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Separate brain circuits for taste and calories helps explain the power of sugar

first_imgShare on Facebook Sugar’s sweetness and calorie content combine to give it lethal power to destroy diets, many scientists have assumed. However, new study by Yale University researchers says the brain responds to taste and calorie counts in fundamentally different ways. And only one of these responses explains why most New Years’ resolutions have already disappeared under a deluge of Boston Crème Pies.It’s the brain’s desire for calories — not sweetness — that dominates our desire for sugars, according to the study appearing Jan. 25, 2016 in the journal Nature Neuroscience.“It turns out the brain actually has two segregated sets of neurons to process sweetness and energy signals,” said Ivan de Araujo of the John B. Pierce Laboratory and senior author of the study. “If the brain is given the choice between pleasant taste and no energy, or unpleasant taste and energy, the brain picks energy.” Share on Twitter Pinterest LinkedIncenter_img Share Email Both sweet taste and nutrient value register in the striatum, an ancient region of the brain involved in processing rewards. Humans have a sweet tooth as one way to ensure we eat enough to give our large brains enough calories to operate at peak efficiency. However, the Yale team studying the brains of mice showed that signals for taste and nutrients are processed in two separate areas of the striatum, the ventral and dorsal, respectively. Signals about the value of taste are processed in the ventral striatum while nutritional value was processed in the dorsal striatum. The dorsal striatum remained responsive to energy even when calories fed to mice were paired with a very aversive taste.The researchers then asked which signal had more control over eating behavior. Mice fed both sugar with sweet taste but no calories or sugar that contained calories but was altered to taste horribly preferred the sugar with energy. When neurons in dorsal striatum were activated by light a technique called optogenetics, mice also ate copious amounts of bad-tasting sugar.“The sugar-responsive circuitry in the brain is therefore hardwired to prioritize calorie seeking over taste quality,” de Iraujo said.The authors hope findings help spur new strategies aiming at curbing excess sugar intake.last_img read more

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