RIO 2016: TOP 10 handball stars which you won’t see in Brazil!

first_imgShareTweetShareShareEmailCommentsSix days before the official opening of the Olympic Games in Rio, Handball-Planet.com presents the list of the biggest handball stars which global sports community won’t be able to see in Brazil. Unfrortunately, the national teams of some most remarkable handball names weren’t good enough to qualify for the Olympics or they weren’t fit…Here is TOP 10 stars which are going to miss Rio:Laszlo Nagy (Hungary)Filip Jicha (Czech Republic)Kiril Lazarov (Macedonia)Momir Ilic (Serbia)Arpad Sterbik (Spain)Anders Eggert (Denmark)Joan Canellas (Spain)Julen Aguinagalde (Spain)Timur Dibirov (Russia)Mirko Alilovic (Croatia)The Men’s Olympic handball tournament starts on August 7. Pingback: RIO 2016: TOP 10 handball guys to watch at Future Arena! | Handball Planet ShareTweetShare ShareEmail 2 Comments 2 Comments Pingback: De 10 största stjärnorna du inte får se i Rio – handbollskanalen RIO 2016 POLL: Who will play at semi-finals?center_img Recommended for you Final placement between 5-12 place: Croatia, Slovenia, Brazil… Related Items:Handball Rio 2016, Men’s Olympic tournament HISTORY! Denmark take Olympic gold! Leave a Reply Cancel replyYour email address will not be published.Comment Name Email Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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Change to sales structure for global supplier First Line

first_imgFirst Line has announced a new level of sales management to strengthen its position as a global supplier of vehicle parts.Ian Boyle, previously UK Sales Manager, will take on the position of UK Sales Director and Andrew McCluskey, former Export Manager will become the new Export Director. Malcolm Rosher joins the company as Business Development Director.The new level is being implemented to strengthen the business, offering greater autonomy and direction to grow and develop as the company continues to expand.Managing Director, Dan Joyner, says: “Strengthening the sales management team demonstrates the current robustness and future commitment of our company. We want to be around for the next 30 years, so it’s important for distributors choosing suppliers to do so not only based on the cost of a part, but rather on the total business offer.”(L-R) Kevin Neaverson, Ian Boyle, Malcolm Rosher, Andrew McCluskeyFirst Line supplies its products to more than 60 countries around the world, with new opportunities being presented daily with its three brands; First Line, Borg & Beck and Key Parts.Kevin Neaverson, Global Sales Director, says: “This new layer of sales management will enable us to develop the business in new ways and will also benefit our many customers.”last_img read more

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AMBER Alert for 16-year-old girl from Crown Point cancelled

first_img Twitter UPDATE: The AMBER Alert for Madison Elizabeth Yancy Eddlemon has been cancelled as of Sunday, August 18, 2019 at 2:30 p.m.ORIGINAL STORY: The Lake County Sheriff’s Office has requested the activation of an AMBER Alert from Crown Point, Indiana.(Photo supplied/Indiana State Police)The victim, Madison Elizabeth Yancy Eddlemon, is a 16 year old white female, 5 feet 1 inches tall, 97 pounds, blonde hair with green eyes, and last seen wearing a black hoodie with white tribal and blue jeans with tears and shin high boots with a black lace choker.  Madison was last seen on Saturday, August 17, 2019, at 9:00 am in Crown Point, Indiana and is believed to be in extreme danger.(Photo supplied/Indiana State Police)The suspect, Alexander Martin Curry-Fishtorn, is a 22 year old white male, 5 feet 7 inches tall, 158 pounds, brown hair with brown eyes, and  driving a dark grey 2009 Chevrolet Cobalt with Indiana license plate number 645RIS.Anybody with information is asked to contact the Lake County Sheriff’s Office at 219-660-0000 or call 911. WhatsApp Google+ IndianaLocalNews Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Google+ Previous articleTesting rules established for Michigan’s hemp crop pilot programNext articleNorth Pointe Road shutting down through November in Warsaw Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Pinterest Pinterest AMBER Alert for 16-year-old girl from Crown Point cancelled By Jon Zimney – August 18, 2019 0 1145 Facebooklast_img read more

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Warning signs which cannot be ignored

first_imgImposing a crude model of economic efficiency on all world economies and neglecting the social costs is a recipe for a political backlash.The unintended consequences of many existing policies, such as the Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MAI) or excessive market harmonisation within the EU, could be the re-emergence of the very classical protectionism they seek to prevent.The growth of the far right in many European countries is a warning sign which should be taken seriously by liberal parties, whether they be of the left or the right. It is a warning sign that the relentless pursuit of economic efficiency without regard to enduring human needs and social cohesion produces recurrences of atavism. Rather than confusing globalisation with a single form of capitalism, we should recognise that it requires a regime under which different types of capitalism can coexist harmoniously to mutual profit.However, that means a shift in the dominant economic philosophy which many transnational organisations implement.They see economic reform as always tending to replicate the same practices and institutions throughout the world. That is Utopia. It will always come up against the fact that different capitalisms represent different historical conditions and circumstances today.This is a legitimate criticism of the International Monetary Fund. The IMF seems to have broadly the same solution to what appear to be radically different economic problems, which reflect the specific histories and circumstances of particular peoples, governments and capitalisms.There have surely been enough policy disasters by now, and sufficient examples of such universal prescriptions failing to meet the specific needs of reform in particular contexts, for us to be sceptical of this approach.In Indonesia, it is argued that IMF prescriptions for greater accountability and openness in both the government and the economy were benign since they dislodged an oppressive tyranny. A wooden, one-eyed insistence on the simple Atlantic pieties of free market economic philosophy is a poor basis of thought with which to confront the risks of a Europe in which the radical right is back on the march.These policy errors are rooted in a misunderstanding of the process of globalisation. Today, the term is used to mean what has happened over the past decade: the spread of free markets and the world-wide deregulation of trade and mobility of capital.Some like to think that the catalyst for this was the fall of the Berlin Wall or the adoption by Deng Xiaoping of market reforms in China or policies of liberalisation applied in western countries.But, for me, none of these explanations gets to the root of globalisation, which is the spread of industrial production from its heartlands in north-western Europe, North America and Australasia throughout the world.The underlying historical process of globalisation goes back centuries and it represents the world-wide diffusion of new technologies. Globalisation and a global free market are separate phenomena. The global free market is merely one way of creating globalisation and probably quite a short-lived one at that.A global free market, modelled on 19th century England and the Anglo-Saxon countries in the 1980s, carries with it important social costs and less stability than conventional opinion perceives. Free markets are not self-regulating. They need management, not only to limit their impact on cohesion but also because speculative bubbles can develop followed by devastating crashes. It is true that the Suharto regime was opaque and oppressive, but it is also true that the incomplete transition which has occurred took place at the cost of economic ruin for much of the population, a fact which will make the task of any successor regime enormously more difficult.The misreading of our contemporary circumstances is exemplified by Francis Fukuyama in his famous essay The End of History. He concludes from the fact that the conflict between two Enlightenment western ideologies, Liberalism and Marxism, has ended, so history has ended.In fact, the ending of the bipolar world has not in any sense been followed by global tranquillisation.On the contrary, the classical origins of war and competition, which had always been there even during the Cold War, have re-emerged very palpably and painfully in the form of conflicts over territory, ethnicity, religion and the control of natural resources. If anything, we have seen a return to history.Fukuyama also assumed that legitimate regimes all over the world would be exemplars of a single ‘democratic capitalism’. But there are several capitalisms and, under the impact of globalising competition, they are all mutating. In many cases, globalisation is producing not democracy but weak or collapsed states or semi-criminalised regimes.It is a great error to imagine that the spread of democracy over the past nine years is irreversible. People said that about its spread before the First World War, about Communism after the Second World War and about the expansion of Fascism between the wars. All those predictions turned out to be erroneous.center_img It is not going too far to say that in some European countries there is now a palpable risk that the classically flawed political responses to economic insecurity that we saw in the Thirties, such as scapegoating foreigners and minorities and growing hostility to concepts of freedom, could be reproduced in a different form now.Of course, unlike the Thirties, there are practically speaking no totalitarian regimes in the world and few mass movements, since we live in a period of mass political demobilisation.Yet, like the Thirties, anti-liberal parties, which had been on the margins excluded from the mainstream of political life, are starting to set the parameters within which the mainstream parties frame policy. We are not far from that situation in Austria or even in France, where the centre right is unravelling, and recent statements from the Bavarian Christian Social Union (CSU) suggest that even in Germany, mainstream politicians are trying to appease the far right.This is a dangerous and combustible brew for European countries.Of all the factors which contribute to this, none is more important than mass unemployment. If it were to be the case, and let us hope that it is not, that the first few years of the euro saw a further increase in joblessness, there would be a serious risk that European institutions would become identified by significant sections of the electorate with mass unemployment.This would compromise the capacity of European institutions to respond to shocks. Within the EU itself, attempts to construct a single type of market economy across the continent is a hubristic goal. It either cannot be achieved or the costs of achieving it are higher than is commonly imagined.The European institutions presuppose that a single model of economic activity is appropriate within all the EU member states but, even as it stands now, the Union is exceedingly diverse.It encompasses the UK, which has long had an individualistic and outward-looking capitalism reinforced by 18 years of neo-liberal policies, along with the German Rhine model which, though reforming itself slowly, is still not converging with Anglo-Saxon capitalism, and Italian capitalism which, in the strong role it assigns family firms, is more like the Chinese variant than the Dutch, German or British models.For these reasons, I plead for a different economic model, one which accepts globalisation, is not Luddite and does not share the approach of some Greens, but which seeks to make globalisation work for human emancipation and well-being.The framework for achieving this should be plural, embody different cultural traditions and capitalisms and, above all, should not be confused with the Utopian project of constructing a universal free market.John Gray is Professor of European Thought at the London School of Economics. He has recently published “False Dawn”, a critique of globalisation.last_img read more

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So much power, but nobody appreciates the work of an MEP

first_imgThe lack of attention leads to meagre turnout at the polls. Clegg says: “Sometimes, as I have voted to make sweeping changes to swathes of EU legislation affecting the UK, I have felt a little squeamish that I am doing so on a shaky mandate from British voters – only one in four bothered to vote in the last Euro elections. Perhaps, one day, MEPs will receive the popular mandate they deserve.” Perhaps, but not if the good ones keep leaving.Another thoughtful opinion piece comes this week from Richard Holbrooke, the former US ambassador to the United Nations, who puts his finger on the key issue left on the table for the upcoming EU summit in Copenhagen: Cyprus.“At stake are three things,” he writes in the Washington Post. “Cyprus’s application for EU membership, Turkey’s desire to start talks on its own EU membership, and the long-stalled talks on the future of the divided island of Cyprus itself.” The first is a done deal, but the other two are trickier, especially after Valéry Giscard d’Estaing’s infamous Le Monde interview in which he declared that Turkey was “not a European [i.e. Christian] nation” and its entry into the EU would be “the end of the European Union”. Retorts Holbrooke: “Merci, M. Giscard. By saying in public what many Europeans have long said in private, Giscard inadvertently did the Turks an enormous favour. Since his comments, almost every other public figure in Europe has been scrambling to disagree with Giscard, and to deny that anyone in Europe could possibly harbour racist feelings toward Turks or other Muslims.”He concludes: “If all goes perfectly, Cyprus will be invited into the EU at Copenhagen, Turkey will be given a starting date for its negotiations, and the two parts of Cyprus will start serious talks on the basis of the UN plan. That would be a real trifecta – a tall order for just three weeks.”On the lighter side, Milan’s Corriere della Serra uncovers an Italian effort to police restaurants abroad, where, as anyone who’s ever been served that Brussels classic dish of pasta covered with a mountain of Emmental cheese knows: “Italian restaurants are not quite as Italian as they should be”. The paper reveals that the Italian government and Confcommercio, the country’s retail and restaurant federation, have launched a “Made in Italy” gold standard for “foreign-Italian” restaurants, so consumers can tell “whether or not what they are paying for is actually good enough to grace an Italian dinner table”. Those are the provocative opening lines of an op-ed column published by MEP Nick Clegg in The Guardian this week. As reported last week, he’s decided not to seek re-election, and, in the fine tradition of politicians leaving office, is getting some things off his chest. This doesn’t make him popular with fellow deputies, but it sure makes for good reading.He writes that while “MEPs are now arguably the most powerful parliamentary lawmakers in Europe”, they get frustratingly little respect or attention. “Largely unknown, usually invisible and widely unloved, MEPs possess considerable clout in legislating on everything from greenhouse gases to banking regulation,” argues Clegg. “Such extensive authority based on such a tenuous relationship with voters is not healthy.” It makes them strong legislators, but weak politicians. Furthermore, “…many of the Parliament’s greatest achievements remain largely unreported. In the environmental field, for instance, MEPs have consistently forced reluctant governments to accept higher standards than they would have adopted if left to their own devices”. In other culinary protectionism news, France’s L’Humanité reports that legendary actor Gerard Depardieu is looking to expand his wine business into Languedoc, where the locals have been fighting against investment from foreign vintners hoping to – gasp – spur the local economy. “The Languedoc wines really say something about this land – they take us back to the ancestral values of the land and its people,” Depardieu claims. He compares last year’s battle by villagers in Aniane to keep out a California wine producer with the Gauls’ fight against the Romans in the film Astérix & Obélix: Mission Cléopâtre, in which he starred as Obélix. Sounds like a job for the local MEP.last_img read more

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Michael Gove: ‘Narcissistic’ Donald Trump won’t serve second term

first_imgIn a wide-ranging interview, Gove also expressed regret for running in the Conservative leadership contest in the aftermath of the U.K.’s referendum on leaving the EU. He also responded to allegations of sabotaging Boris Johnson’s leadership bid, having previously pledged to support the now foreign secretary.“With the benefit of hindsight, I should have not been so quick to say that I was going to support Boris in the first place and probably should never have run myself,” he said.Gove also confirmed that he no longer speaks to former Prime Minister David Cameron, despite the two being longtime friends.When Theresa May became prime minister, she sacked Gove from the cabinet and he returned to the backbenches, as well as to writing a column for the Times. Also On POLITICO The man who invented Trumpism By Naomi O’Leary Germany’s gamble to break even with Trump at G20 By Johanna Treeck Leading Brexiteer and former British Justice Secretary Michael Gove questioned Donald Trump’s character and said he wouldn’t make it to a second term.In an interview with Christian Today published Thursday, Gove, who interviewed Trump for the Times of London shortly after he took office, said of the U.S. president: “He is someone who is clearly narcissistic or egotistical enough to want to be seen as a success.” But Gove said he believed Trump would either resign or lose the 2020 election.“My hunch is that he will see through this term and then he will lose the next election. Knowing that he might lose, he might find some means of quitting while he thinks he is ahead,” Gove said.last_img read more

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Gene Ween and Umphrey’s McGee To Join Forces At Summer Camp

first_imgUmphrey’s McGee announced today that they will perform alongside Gene Ween at this year’s Summer Camp Festival, taking place May 22-24 in Chillicothe, IL. “Godboner” (Umphs’ alter-ego) and the founding Ween guitarist will play a set of originals and covers. This year’s Summer Camp will also feature a number of Grateful Dead tribute sets from Keller Williams, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead and more.Earlier today we announced our official Summer Camp pre-party featuring members of Umphrey’s, The Motet and Digital Tape Machine aboard a yacht in Chicago.last_img read more

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University Hall rearranged, College expands some offices

first_imgMany University Hall offices were relocated this summer as part of an effort by Harvard College and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) to better meet the needs of students and faculty. These changes occur as plans take shape for the College to open additional offices in Holyoke Center.The College will renovate the fourth floor of Holyoke Center in the coming year, opening a suite of offices to serve undergraduates starting in the fall semester of 2009. Most College offices with limited student interaction will remain in University Hall.“The administrative structure of both FAS and the College has evolved substantially,” says FAS Dean Michael D. Smith. “In particular, several College offices that have expanded to better serve our students are now confined to spaces that no longer meet their needs.”One such group, the Office for International Programs (OIP), will move temporarily from University Hall to more spacious quarters at 2 Arrow St., relocating to the new student services center in Holyoke Center when construction is complete next summer. The number of students advised and supported by OIP in various ventures abroad has grown enormously in the past several years: Study abroad for Harvard degree credit has increased fourfold in recent years, from 160 students in 2001-02 to 640 students in 2007-08.“The OIP has grown by leaps and bounds, and we want to make sure they have the room they need to assist the increasing numbers of our students who elect to study abroad,” says College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds. “I am very excited that in a year’s time we will be able to offer our students a single convenient location in Holyoke Center with one-stop access to the OIP and other College offices.”Hammonds will spend the coming year weighing which other College services might logically join the OIP in Holyoke Center.As part of the current moves within University Hall, staff of the Office of Residential Life, the Office of Student Activities, the Harvard Foundation, and the Advising Programs Office — also greatly expanded in recent years — will be grouped on the lowest two levels of University Hall. Students will gain improved access to the Office of Student Activities, which will move into the space vacated by the OIP.The College’s Office for Administration and Finance will move to 1414 Massachusetts Ave., alongside the FAS Financial Office. This move, in turn, will prompt the Office of Career Services’ On-Campus Recruiting Program, currently at 1414 Massachusetts Ave., to return to 1033 Massachusetts Ave., where recruiting offices were located for several years earlier in this decade.The new configuration of offices in University Hall is intended to facilitate interactions between the College, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, FAS academic deans, and administrative offices.In recent months Smith has also reshaped the FAS’s Office of Faculty Affairs (formerly the Office of Academic Affairs) and has recast the role of the dean for administration and finance with the hiring of Brett Sweet. The reallocation of space in University Hall reflects the new priority assigned to these functions within the FAS leadership team.last_img read more

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Zimbra undergoes changes

first_imgSince spring break, Saint Mary’s students, faculty and staff have encountered more Zimbra outages, as the service experienced sporadic shortages and dysfunction. Similar shortages and minor outages have plagued the College since February. A major shortage occurred last month when Zimbra functioned unreliably for several days in a row. Once the email system began functioning properly again, the Department of Information Technology sent emails to students and faculty with advice on how to combat slow servers. Recommendations included emptying trash and junk folders regularly, limiting the number of attachments sent in emails and sending messages through Blackboard instead of Zimbra. Chief Information Officer [CIO] Michael Boehm said working through technical difficulties requires cooperation from everyone. “We can all do our part by lightening the load on the email server, which can only help with service,” he said. However, unresponsive servers continue to disrupt communication between students, professors and the College. Junior Annie Root said she recognizes the problems are not easy fixes, but she is frustrated with frequent technical difficulties. “I understand that Information Technology is working as diligently as possible to fix the problems, but it’s so frustrating to have Zimbra constantly out of service,” she said. “I rely on email to work on group projects and talk with my professors and for work. It’s aggravating to have Zimbra not work and slows my productivity.” Junior Meghan Feasel said Zimbra use is essential for everyday tasks, especially her job as an employee of the Alumnae Relations office. “We stay in contact with alumnae through emails. Therefore, our office runs mainly on Zimbra,” she said. “Lately, we haven’t been able to receive any emails. It’s not just frustrating, it’s detrimental.” In order to address these issues, Boehm said plans are in the works for improving Zimbra service in the immediate future. “In the short term, Information Technology has contracted with a Zimbra business partner for support, which will include an update to the software and remote monitoring and support,” he said. “This should resolve some of the issues that Zimbra continues to experience.” Some students have questioned whether Saint Mary’s should switch to another service provider. “I understand it isn’t an easy fix and the process is probably complicated, but I wish we would get rid of Zimbra and switch to [Google’s email service] Gmail,” Root said. “I think it would significantly improve things.” Although no email service change has been confirmed, Boehm said a switch could occur sometime in the future. While some students may support the implementation of Gmail, Information Technology is considering other options as part of its long-term goals to improve email services. “The College is investigating long-term solutions to improve email communication, which includes looking at a vendor other than Zimbra,” Boehm said. “As the CIO, I will lead the evaluation of the email system and the resolution efforts. Gmail is certainly an option.  We are looking at a number of products and vendors.”last_img read more

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The One. Now Available through Formigli Bikes

first_imgWant custom painted, matching bars and stem? Formigli can make it happen. The front of the One houses a 1 1/2″ to 1 1/8″ tapered steerer with a high modulus carbon fork. The One frame is constructed from T800 high modulus carbon fiber with a specialized lay up to offer both the stiffness and comfort Formigli was looking for. Calling it the highest performing and most comfortable bike Renzo has ever made, new carbon was employed to enable new shapes and tubes to create the bike. While the top tube and seatstays got smaller, the down tube and chainstays get bigger, all part of improving performance while smoothing out the ride.There is also the curved seat tube with an aerodynamic shape to both stiffen the frame and make it faster. The non integrated but proprietary seat post is included with the frame, and painted to match – naturally.Due to the custom nature of Formigli’s bikes, prices and geometries aren’t given. Have to know? Head over to Formigli and request a quote on a frameset or complete bike.Frame Specs: Are you looking for the One? Formigli thinks this is the one. The one road bike you need. It wasn’t long ago that Formigli was teasing their new One road bike, and as the company seldom releases new frames it’s a special occasion for fans of the brand, and custom carbon road bikes alike. Part aero road bike, part Gran Fondo bike, part race bike, Formigli claims the One offers a perfect blend of rigidity and comfort. As usual, the One is only offered as a made to order custom bike with your choice of colors in matte or glossy finish like the glossy McLaren F1 esque paint job above.More of the One, next.last_img read more

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