Bath Bus takes debut Euro 6

first_imgThe Bath Bus Company, part of RATP, has taken delivery of two new Volvo B5TL double-deckers, the company’s first Euro 6 vehicles.With a passenger capacity of 79, they will be used on tourist routes in the city, where strict operational rules apply. With UNVI’s Urbis 25 half-canopied upper deck for sightseeing, a “significant number” of adaptations have been made in response to feedback received from drivers and operational staff after experience with last year’s deliveries.Bath Bus Company MD Martin Curtis says: “Our team is particularly impressed with the adaptations to the design and layout, including increased cab space, wider entrance doors and changes to the wing mirrors and fuel filler. In particular, the twin-stair/two-door access enables much faster loading.”last_img read more

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Blair revives old memories

first_imgAt one point during last weekend’s Luxembourg summit row over the status of the new Euro-X single currency group, France’s Lionel Jospin suggested that the text under discussion be drafted in English to make it easier for UK Premier Tony Blair to understand. Blair promptly replied – in French – that this would not be necessary.A version everyone could live with was finally agreed upon, but not before Blair had insisted on putting his case for UK participation in the disputed group with what French President Jacques Chirac’s spokeswoman Catherine Colonna described as a “tenacity” which brought back fond memories of former Conservative British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.Luxembourg Premier and summit chairman Jean-Claude Juncker was apparently interrupted a record 13 times – mostly by Blair – as he tried to bring the Euro-X discussion to a close. As a result, what had originally been planned as a brief ten-minute chat ended up taking five hours. Despite the tense Euro-X exchanges, Blair gave a polished performance at his final press conference as he deftly sidestepped a cunning trap laid for him by a Romanian reporter who asked the UK premier to name Romania’s prime minister – not an unreasonable request given that, what with EU enlargement and the UK’s forthcoming Union presidency, the two men are likely to be in regular contact over the coming months.However, with a masterful display of the skilful politician’s ability to not answer the question, Blair replied that he had just been talking to the Romanian president and gave an in-depth account of what they had discussed.So fulsome was his description of their meeting that Blair managed to avoid giving the premier’s name, or that of the esteemed head of state with whom he had just held face-to-face talks.last_img read more

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WTO chief defiant on ‘excessive farm subsidies’ claim

first_imgLast weekend a row between Lamy and WTO Director-General Supachai Panitchpakdi entered the public arena, with the leak of a strongly-worded letter in which Lamy queried an allegation by Supachai that rich countries spend €245 billion per year on agricultural support.Lamy had described it as “extremely annoying” that Supachai had quoted the €245 billion sum, which he claims is a “very contestable” statistic used by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The French commissioner said that amount did not accurately reflect the sum actually paid out to farmers, as it had been adjusted to also take account of such factors as tariff barriers. The “honest figure” for subsidies paid by rich countries would be €82bn per year, €37bn of which is accounted for by the EU. But a senior WTO source said his boss has no intention of backing down. The source added that Supachai has “responded forcefully to a number of points” raised by Lamy in a subsequent letter to the Frenchman. In particular, the former deputy premier of Thailand referred to a clause in the Doha Declaration, agreed in November 2001 at the WTO ministerial in the Qatar capital. Paragraph 13 of the declaration, which deals with agriculture, commits rich countries to “reductions, with a view to phasing out, all forms of export subsidies”.The onus on rich countries to cut subsidies is “all spelled out very clearly”, said the source, who acknowledged there is “obviously a disagreement” between the two men on the actual level of subsidies now being paid. Anti-poverty campaigners, who believe that EU agricultural subsidies are discriminating against farmers in poor countries, have rallied to Supachai’s defence.“In 2002, the EU handed out €3.4bn in export subsidies alone to help farmers dump excess produce overseas,” said Jo Leadbeater from Oxfam. “Lamy knows this and no amount of bluster will change the facts.”last_img read more

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Hendrick Motorsports, Byron reveal Liberty No. 24 paint scheme for 2021

first_imgHendrick Motorsports and Liberty University debuted their 2021 look for the No. 24 Chevrolet on Wednesday, unveiling the Liberty-sponsored ride for William Byron in the NASCAR Cup Series next year.Liberty has been a primary sponsor of Byron at each stage of his NASCAR national-series career, following him from the Camping World Truck Series to the Xfinity Series and eventually the Cup Series with HMS for his rookie year in 2018. Liberty was the primary sponsor of the No. 24 Chevy for 11 races last year.RELATED: William Byron’s 2020 paint schemes in reviewByron has been a student at the Lynchburg, Virginia-based school, studying online as he balances his course load with his racing career. The Liberty University News Service indicated Byron has targeted a December 2021 graduation.Byron, 23, notched his first Cup Series win last season, carrying the dark blue and red Liberty colors to victory at Daytona International Speedway in the regular-season finale.last_img read more

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Siren Swan Song for Senior NY EMT

first_img“He’s been on the streets for 42 years and that’s just unheard of,” noted SIUH EMS supervisor William Goffin. Duchin, 62, of Dongan Hills, received a lights-and-sirens escort as he drove his ambulance, truck 5525, into the ambulance bay behind Staten Island University Hospital, Ocean Breeze, for the last time. “Enjoy it. But retire after 20 years.” A gala in his honor will be held Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in the Staaten, West Brighton. An EMT at the hospital since 1966, when it was called Staten Island Hospital and located in Tompkinsville, Duchin was greeted at the end of his tour – exactly 11:30 p.m. – by more than 40 applauding well-wishers, including colleagues, supervisors and longtime friends. Duchin, who also celebrated his birthday yesterday, graduated from McKee High School. He started his career in 1963 at the former St. Vincent’s Hospital, now Richmond University Medical Center. In fact, Duchin, recollects that he was among the first four EMTs in all of New York City. Paramedic and buddy Jim Martin recalled how he, his mother and his father all have worked with Duchin. For more information, call Jim Martin at 917-921-1068.Doug Auer covers police and fire news for the Advance. He may be reached at [email protected] He did a brief stint in the U.S. Air Force, assigned to aircraft maintenance, but lost his hearing due to jet noise and was discharged. “I was 9 years old when he started here,” said senior paramedic and Duchin’s good pal, Bob Garzone. Now, Duchin is looking forward to relaxing and traveling. “Only 18 years, I shouldn’t even talk to him, he’s only a rookie,” joked Duchin. NEW YORK — After 42 years of helping save lives, Michael Duchin stepped out of his ambulance last Thursday night and into retirement. Not to mention the countless injuries he has treated night after night. Duchin has been with SIUH ever since. In that career span, Duchin has helped deliver 52 babies, saved a man and baby from drowning in the waters off Stapleton in 1985 and helped rescue a father and son from an apartment fire in the 1990s. His advice for those following in his footsteps: “I’ve really enjoyed helping people and it’s such a nice job,” Duchin said during a ceremony in the EMT crew room in the hospital. Some present playfully referred to him by his well-deserved nickname, “Old School.” To put the length of his career in perspective, Duchin passed on the honorary title of “senior man” to SIUH EMT Benny Gatto, who has 18 years on the job.last_img read more

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How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThe current educational system in the US was constructed almost two centuries ago to meet the needs of the industrial age. Now that our society and economy have evolved beyond that era, our schools must also be reinvented.We can see what the future looks like in places like Mexico where one teacher fueled his low-income students to rise to the top of the nation by letting go of the reigns of teaching, to allow for child-led natural learning.Or we can look to Finland, where they adopted this new philosophy nationwide—with outsize results. In the 1990s, Finland pared the country’s elementary math curriculum from about 25 pages to four, reduced the school day by an hour, and focused on independence and self-directed learning based on their innate curiosity. By 2003, Finnish students had climbed from the lower rungs of international performance rankings to first place among developed nations.(READ the featured story in Wired)Photo credit: One Laptop Per Child projectAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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New 24-Hour Vending Machine Dispenses Clothing and Blankets to the Homeless for Free

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreAs winter approaches, this new vending machine is being stocked with warm blankets and clothing for the homeless – and all of it can be accessed for free.The vending machine is readily available to the 200 homeless people who are currently living in Muncie, Indiana. All they have to do to access the supplies is register with local community services.Once registered, they are given vending machine tokens that can be used to take the goods for free. RELATED: Simple Solution Provides the Homeless With Housing and Jobs in One Fell SwoopAll the machine’s contents were donated by local residents who want to offer their support to the needy.“We know that they are out there. Some are in shelters, some are in different living situations,” Karee Buffin with the Bridges Community Services Fund told RTV6.“We really want to use something like this to reach out to people. It does demonstrate that our community cares.”(WATCH the news coverage below) – Photo by RTV6Help Your Friends Warm Up With This Wonderful News By Sharing It To Social MediaAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s launches mental health initiative focusing on first-year experiences

first_imgEditor’s Note: An earlier version of this article misstated the use of a wellness initiative survey and incorrectly listed Becky Lindstrom and Shay Schneider as faculty members.Saint Mary’s decided to make significant changes to how mental illness is addressed on campus. The College created two new administrative positions to address mental health concerns. With the help of new staff members Becky Lindstrom and Shay Jolly Schneider, the College launched a new wholeness framework designed to address the physical, mental and emotional needs of its students, particularly through restructuring the first-year experience. Lindstrom, a registered life coach, joined the faculty on a two-year contract to help address increasing concerns about wellness and health on campus.“I was brought in by Saint Mary’s late last year to help the school address the rise in stress and anxiety among students,” Lindstrom said. “The initial conversation was about creating a peer coaching cohort, so bringing in a life coach was the logical first step. Since the start, it has gotten so much bigger. There are so many other pieces involved.” Schneider, the new director of retention and first-year experience, said she knew she needed to reach out to new students to address anxieties and improve overall well-being. “I work closely with our first-year programming, whether that be through orientation programs, Belles Beginnings, preview days or the first-year experience course [otherwise known as Sophia Program in Liberal Learning] and the peer mentor program,” she said. “We saw that mental health was one of the main reasons that students were choosing to leave. We realized that the retention piece was not missing anything, but there was something we could do better.”This led Lindstrom and Schneider to combine forces to initiate campus-wide changes, starting with improving some aspects of the freshman experience and educating upperclassmen on how to provide appropriate support and resources. “When [Lindstrom] was brought in, we talked about launching this peer coaching program which we are working on,” Schneider said. “We are looking to recruit members during the fall semester with a formal launch in the spring.”  Lindstrom and Schneider also looked at the first-year program and decided to make some new changes.“In the past, we’ve gotten feedback from first-year students and peer mentors that they felt there was a lack of connection between the two groups,” Schneider said. “Peer mentors didn’t feel like they were having the best opportunities to build relationships with their first years and vice versa. We saw this as an opportunity to reboot our peer mentor program and bring some fresh energy into that.” As new ideas began to develop, Lindstrom created a new wholeness framework to integrate into the SPLL course. “The framework is essentially the idea that if you’re going to educate the whole student, you have to help them help themselves by taking care of physical health, mental wellness and faith and spirituality,” Lindstrom said. “You also need to have the emotional resilience to be able to be aware of what you need to feel fulfilled. So we are trying to build that idea of inherent self-worth in addition to self-awareness and fulfillment.”She said the framework stresses the values of identity and community in the hopes that it will give students resources to succeed.“The framework is truly about developing the person and what it means to be a Saint Mary’s woman,” Schneider said. “We don’t want anyone to feel like they’re just checking off boxes through a program. It’s something that will ultimately help you to help yourself.”  While the programs are specifically geared towards freshmen, many upperclassmen have also been provided with the framework. Lindstrom and Schneider said they hope upperclassmen involvement will help the program spread to the populations they can’t reach. “The focus was to start with the incoming freshmen hoping that this year, these students will become sophomores — who will then eventually become juniors — and within four years, this will be something that’s known around campus,” Lindstrom said. “While we won’t be doing anything for the sophomores, juniors and seniors directly, we’re hoping that within that leadership community of upperclassmen, this program will spread organically.” Peer mentors working with freshmen have noticed a positive change in the restructuring of the first-year program.“I think the wellness program is so helpful, I wish I had it when I was a freshman,” senior peer mentor Liz Ferry said. “It helps us to frame the conversation, not only how to be a good student, but also how to be a good person and how to focus on your mental health, academics and spiritual well-being. That is all part of your experience at Saint Mary’s.”Junior, peer mentor Carin Kaminski thinks the new framework provides practical activities to help overall well-being.“This year we have some new ways to help freshman deal with stress,” Kaminski said. “We introduced this self-planning goal program called WOOP. Also, we have different weeks dedicated to self-awareness, community, how to handle stress and how to get involved on campus.” Kaminski also thinks it puts the freshmen in a better position to utilize the resources the College has to offer. “I think these freshmen know a lot more than what we did,” she said. “I am telling them everything from the bus schedule to all that our academic offices, counseling and health and wellness center have to offer. I just think we’re giving them all the resources that we possibly know, and because of this, they are a lot more prepared than we were.” While many of the program activities are just being introduced, first years are taking the program seriously.“Right now in my SPLL class we’re discussing the basics of college — time management, stress and how to manage it all,” first year Abby Brown said. “When we’re discussing all of this, I take it seriously.”The College hopes the new wellness initiative will have significant short and long-term impacts for the school. Lindstrom said she hopes her presence at the College will ultimately allow this project to grow. “Short term goals have to be simple and effective,” she said. “We hope to show results for the students so that it gives them the momentum to keep doing it. In the long term, I hope the students will take ownership so that when they graduate, it won’t just be about how to be Saint Mary’s students. It will help them live their lives.”For Schenider, creating a better future for Saint Mary’s students is a personal goal. “As an alum, I think about the things I wish that I had as a first year student,” she said. “It’s not that Saint Mary’s is missing anything, it’s that we’ve seen a concern and given this initiative structure. I’m just really grateful for the opportunity to be part of setting the groundwork and hopefully leaving this legacy of what could truly be a student experience unlike any other.” Tags: first-year experience, Mental health, wholeness frameworklast_img read more

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Which player was key to Lancers’ state football run? No one

first_imgThe Lancers came off the field Friday after securing the team’s first-ever trip to the state title game.As his team began celebrating on the field after the Lancers’ 37-27 defeat of Olathe North Friday, a friend of coach Dustin Delaney ran up to him and shouted the word “unbelievable” over and over again.And when asked what differentiated his team from those who had been eliminated from a shot at the title, Delaney himself used the word again.“Unbelievable teamwork,” Delaney said. “We’ve had new kids step up every single night. And we’re the ultimate concept of team. All our kids will do anything for each other. The reward is that we get to go to state.”Indeed, one of the defining aspects of this year’s SM East team is its lack of a true “star.” A check of individual season stats through the Sectionals round produces a notable lack of SM East players at the top of any category. Luke Taylor was among the top three running backs in the league with 1,102 yards and 11 touchdowns – but the Lancers don’t have a player among the top five in passing or receiving yards.Yes, there are players whose names found their way into the box score more frequently than others over the course of the season. But, from game to game, it seemed an entirely new set of players would account for the key plays that secured the win.SM East doesn’t beat Olathe Northwest without Alec Dean pulling in a bobbled ball after Christian Blessen’s Hail Mary. SM East doesn’t beat Olathe North in the regular season without Dominique Atkinson’s fourth quarter safety. SM East doesn’t beat SM South without Luke Taylor running in for an overtime touchdown. And if the Lancers are going to finish the mission they started and bring home the first football title in SM East history, you’d better believe it’s going to be a true team effort on Saturday.Congrats on an amazing season so far, Lancers. Go beat Derby together. Goin to STATE from Brian Libeer on Vimeo.last_img read more

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JoCo district attorney charges 3 juveniles in connection to Prairie Village shooting death

first_imgA day after announcing 1st degree murder charges against a man for the shooting death of a teen in Prairie Village earlier this month, Johnson County District Attorney Steve Howe has announced additional charges against three juveniles.The charges include:Premeditated 1st degree murder and attempted robbery against a 17-year-old from Kansas City, Kan.1st degree murder and attempted robbery against a 16-year-old female from Mission1st degree murder and attempted robbery against a 17-year-old-male from Merriam.The Johnson County District Attorney’s office does not release the names of minors charged with crimes. Their cases are handled in juvenile court.On Wednesday, Howe’s office announced that law enforcement had arrested Jesse M. Monreal, 35, and charged him with 1st degree murder and attempted robbery stemming from a shooting May 5 that left a teen dead in Prairie Village. The deceased was identified as Kiven M. Maquial of Mission. He was 18.last_img read more

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