Pearl Jam Sets a Ticking Clock Countdown on Website

first_imgThere’s a countdown. We don’t know why or what for but its causing a buzz. Having recently re-vamped their entire website, Pearl Jam has included a digital countdown on their main page that will end sometime next Monday. Some are speculating that the countdown is for the release of their new single which is reportedly to be called “Mind Your Manners”, but some full on tour dates would be just as welcome, if not more, as the only scheduled dates at the moment are their upcoming Chicago and Ontario Canada shows. I guess we will just have to wait until Monday, until then your guess is as good as ours.[via GlideMagazine.com]last_img read more

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George Clinton Shares Stories About Hiding A Crack Pipe From A Teenage Chelsea Clinton

first_imgNo name is more synonymous with funk music than George Clinton. Having led Parliament-Funkadelic, aka P-Funk, for decades upon decades, Clinton’s psychedelic influences helped to define a genre.Reflecting back on his years of success, Clinton sat down with the New York Post to share stories from his past, in advance of his forthcoming memoir, Brothas Be, Yo Like George, Ain’t That Funkin’ Kinda Hard on You?Clinton talks about his beginnings, playing in a band called The Parliaments, and the merging of that band and Funkadelic to create P-Funk. The article talks about the flamboyant costumes – Clinton says “I actually got freaked out when girls wanted me, because I figured they were weirder than me!” – and on-stage drug use, and even features a quote from Clinton about LSD’s effect on his digestive system. Clinton: “The thing about acid is that it ruins your stomach — it’s acid, after all. We were eating a lot of soul food at the time, too, so basically, we all spent hours in the bathroom and had more hemorrhoids than you could imagine.”The legend opens up about his use of crack-cocaine, unabashedly telling what is easily the best story in the interview: A teenage Chelsea Clinton came backstage after a show and asked for a picture. Startled by the Secret Service, George was forced to conceal a red-hot crack pipe in one hand while shaking the first daughter’s hand with the other. The subsequent picture was printed in People magazine. “You don’t give a f–k when you’re on crack.”Another time, he spent a night in jail with Sly Stone, as the duo were busted for possession in the parking lot of a Denny’s. And while drug use may have taken a toll on him financially – “I was running around and getting high. I didn’t pay enough attention to business” – the artist is still working on new music. He has an album out with Kendrick Lamar, with the same title as his memoir. The memoir is due out today, October 21st.last_img read more

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Gene Ween and Umphrey’s McGee To Join Forces At Summer Camp

first_imgUmphrey’s McGee announced today that they will perform alongside Gene Ween at this year’s Summer Camp Festival, taking place May 22-24 in Chillicothe, IL. “Godboner” (Umphs’ alter-ego) and the founding Ween guitarist will play a set of originals and covers. This year’s Summer Camp will also feature a number of Grateful Dead tribute sets from Keller Williams, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead and more.Earlier today we announced our official Summer Camp pre-party featuring members of Umphrey’s, The Motet and Digital Tape Machine aboard a yacht in Chicago.last_img read more

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Exclusive Video | Grateful Dead’s Bill Kreutzmann Sits In SuperGroup w/ Lettuce Members

first_imgGrateful Dead drummer Bill Kreutzmann has been doing a lot of sit-ins recently, from bucket drumming on the streets of San Francisco to joining an unsuspecting band for a cover of the Dead’s classic tune, “Scarlet Begonias.” Perhaps it’s no surprise that Kreutzmann continued his sit-in streak.The “Fantastic Four” concert, featuring an all-star lineup of Oteil Burbridge, Eric Krasno, Adam Deitch and Robert Walter featuring Cheme Gastelum (Dap Kings/Antibalas) at the Blue Nile in New Orleans, were in for a surprise, as Grateful Dead drummer Bill Kreutzmann joined in the festivities.During the show Kreutzmann exclaimed to his manager Benjy Eisen, “Do you see this? Do you see this!”, as he gushed over Deitch’s playing. After his sit-in Bill Kreutzmann was quoted by L4LM saying, “Adam Deitch is my current favorite drummer!”Adam Deitch currently plays in Lettuce, Break Science, and Pretty Lights Live Band. It is no surprise where Adam’s talent comes from, as both of his parents are remarkable musicians. His father, Bobby Deitch, is playing a Live For Live Music show with Adam Deitch in New York on May 19th at Webster Hall! His mother, Denise Deitch, recently sat in with Marco Benvento, Robert Walter, Skerik, and more in New Orleans! Watch Exclusive L4LM Pro-Shot Video footage below via Greg Aiello:last_img read more

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Foo Fighters Reportedly Rebooked For Major Headlining Gig A Year In Advance

first_imgAfter being forced to cancel their headlining slot at Glastonbury this weekend due to Dave Grohl’s broken leg, the Foo Fighters have reportedly already been slated to headline next year’s festival.Foo Fighters Want To Only Make Concept Albums From Now OnAccording to NME, an undisclosed source told The Sun, “Dave was beyond gutted about pulling out of Glastonbury, especially at such short notice. But [festival organizer] Michael [Eavis] was quick to book him for next year as he’s desperate for the Foos to headline. He knows they’ll go down a storm at Glasto. Dave agreed within seconds.”In the meantime, Florence and the Machine will take over for the band at the major UK festival this weekend while Dave Grohl recovers.last_img read more

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Harvard, Cambridge establish Joint Center for History and Economics

first_imgCrossing academic disciplines and the Atlantic Ocean, the Harvard University Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) and King’s College, Cambridge, have established the Joint Center for History and Economics (JCHE). The JCHE will facilitate and encourage interdisciplinary research and learning in the social sciences and the humanities.The Centre for History and Economics was established at King’s College in 1991. With the creation of the counterpart center at Harvard, these two leading research institutions will have the opportunity to exchange ideas and engage in mutually beneficial scholarly collaboration.“The Joint Center for History and Economics represents an exciting opportunity to explore the connections between the two academic disciplines, ” says Emma Rothschild, who co-founded the Centre at King’s College. The JCHE will make it possible for two world-renowned research institutions to engage in an exciting and productive relationship, and will provide a location for research students and leading scholars in the field to participate in a rigorous dialogue.Rothschild, one of the leading historians of the Enlightenment, has been a visiting professor of history at Harvard since 2004, and will join the Harvard faculty as a professor of history in July 2007. Rothschild will serve as the founding director of the JCHE at Harvard (see professorship announcement, this page).The JCHE will undertake substantial research projects focused on academic concerns within history and economics, including the history of economic and social thought, the application of economic concepts to historical problems, and the use of historical insights in economic analysis. The collaboration will also result in workshops, seminars, and exchanges of faculty and graduate students.The Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University and the Centre for History and Economics at King’s College have previously participated in cooperative research programs and academic exchanges. Since 2004, they have collaborated on the research project “Exchanges of Economic and Political Ideas since 1760,” supported by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This project is focused on political, economic, and social connections across national borders, and is concerned both with Atlantic history and with the history of Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean.Recent research projects at King’s College include “Globalization in Historical Perspective,” “The Rise and Fall of Historical Political Economy,” and “Religion and the Political Imagination,” which examines the historical foundations of political assumptions about universal secularization. Other research topics include global security across national borders, with a particular focus on the history of the United Nations.The JCHE will be administered from both sides of the Atlantic. The overall direction of the JCHE will be determined by a joint management committee, and executive oversight committees in both Cambridge, England, and Cambridge, Mass. Each committee will have responsibility for initiation and guidance of the activities of its own center. The Web site for the JCHE will be hosted on the Web sites for King’s College and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University.last_img read more

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University Hall rearranged, College expands some offices

first_imgMany University Hall offices were relocated this summer as part of an effort by Harvard College and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) to better meet the needs of students and faculty. These changes occur as plans take shape for the College to open additional offices in Holyoke Center.The College will renovate the fourth floor of Holyoke Center in the coming year, opening a suite of offices to serve undergraduates starting in the fall semester of 2009. Most College offices with limited student interaction will remain in University Hall.“The administrative structure of both FAS and the College has evolved substantially,” says FAS Dean Michael D. Smith. “In particular, several College offices that have expanded to better serve our students are now confined to spaces that no longer meet their needs.”One such group, the Office for International Programs (OIP), will move temporarily from University Hall to more spacious quarters at 2 Arrow St., relocating to the new student services center in Holyoke Center when construction is complete next summer. The number of students advised and supported by OIP in various ventures abroad has grown enormously in the past several years: Study abroad for Harvard degree credit has increased fourfold in recent years, from 160 students in 2001-02 to 640 students in 2007-08.“The OIP has grown by leaps and bounds, and we want to make sure they have the room they need to assist the increasing numbers of our students who elect to study abroad,” says College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds. “I am very excited that in a year’s time we will be able to offer our students a single convenient location in Holyoke Center with one-stop access to the OIP and other College offices.”Hammonds will spend the coming year weighing which other College services might logically join the OIP in Holyoke Center.As part of the current moves within University Hall, staff of the Office of Residential Life, the Office of Student Activities, the Harvard Foundation, and the Advising Programs Office — also greatly expanded in recent years — will be grouped on the lowest two levels of University Hall. Students will gain improved access to the Office of Student Activities, which will move into the space vacated by the OIP.The College’s Office for Administration and Finance will move to 1414 Massachusetts Ave., alongside the FAS Financial Office. This move, in turn, will prompt the Office of Career Services’ On-Campus Recruiting Program, currently at 1414 Massachusetts Ave., to return to 1033 Massachusetts Ave., where recruiting offices were located for several years earlier in this decade.The new configuration of offices in University Hall is intended to facilitate interactions between the College, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, FAS academic deans, and administrative offices.In recent months Smith has also reshaped the FAS’s Office of Faculty Affairs (formerly the Office of Academic Affairs) and has recast the role of the dean for administration and finance with the hiring of Brett Sweet. The reallocation of space in University Hall reflects the new priority assigned to these functions within the FAS leadership team.last_img read more

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Brigham face transplant recipient goes home

first_imgJames Maki, a 59-year-old who became the nation’s second face transplant recipient in April to repair injuries from a horrific subway accident, left Brigham and Women’s Hospital on Thursday (May 21), thankful for what he called a “new chance to build my life.”Maki, whose April 9 surgery at the Harvard-affiliated hospital received wide news coverage, appeared in public for the first time Thursday morning at a Brigham news conference. With him was Susan Whitman-Helfgot, the wife of donor Joseph Helfgot, who died at age 60 during heart transplant surgery.Maki expressed his gratitude to the Helfgot family and the doctors at the Brigham and said he hopes his story highlights the importance of organ donation. Maki, whose place of residence was kept confidential, asked for privacy as he continues his rehabilitation and takes steps to start his life again.“They did not know me. Clearly it was a deeply held belief in helping others that led them to their decision,” Maki said of the Helfgots. “I will be forever grateful.”Maki, a Vietnam veteran who moved to Amherst, Mass., from Seattle when he was in high school, was injured in 2005 during an accident at the Ruggles stop on Boston’s subway Orange Line. Maki fell onto the tracks and came in contact with the electrified third rail. The contact burned away much of the middle of Maki’s face, including his upper lip, hard palate that makes up the roof of the mouth, and his nose.Reconstructive surgery after the accident left Maki able to survive, but with a hole in his face where his nose used to be and difficulty speaking and eating.His partial face transplant gave him a new nose, hard palate, upper lip, nasal structure, facial skin and the muscles and nerves that move the skin and give it sensation.He received the transplant during a marathon 17-hour procedure that involved 35 doctors, anesthesiologists, nurses, and other clinical personnel working in two operating rooms to harvest the tissue and transplant it.Maki said the transplant is pain free and the first thing he thought when he looked at his new face was that his new nose looks like his old one.Whitman-Helfgot also spoke Thursday, describing her husband as someone who grew up in poverty but sought out an education, earning a doctorate. He became a father and worked in Hollywood as a marketing adviser on such films as “Iron Man,” “X-Men,” and “Spider-Man.” She declined to share details of the family’s discussions as they weighed whether to permit the transplant, but urged everyone in the room to sign up to become organ donors, saying her husband’s heart transplant failed because he had to wait too long for a donor heart.Seeing Maki, she said, helps take some of the sting out of losing her husband. She called Maki’s transformation “a miracle and a blessing.”Also speaking Thursday were Elof Eriksson, chief of the Brigham’s Division of Plastic Surgery and Joseph E. Murray Professor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Harvard Medical School; Bohdan Pomahac, a plastic surgeon at the Brigham and assistant professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School; and Richard Luskin, president and chief executive officer of the New England Organ Bank.Pomahac, who led the surgical team for Maki’s transplant, first met Maki the night of his injury, when he was the surgeon on call. The thought of doing a face transplant didn’t occur to Pomahac, since the first such operation, in France in 2005, hadn’t yet been conducted.Maki faces a lifetime on antirejection drugs to ensure his body doesn’t reject the donor tissue as foreign. Because those drugs suppress his immune system, they could make Maki more susceptible to infection. He may also face additional surgery to trim excess skin, Pomahac said, though that hasn’t been determined yet. It will take months before the swelling goes down and enough nerve regrowth occurs to give Maki sensation in his new tissue. After that happens, further steps will be considered, Pomahac said.“We will not let our guard down because we’re in uncharted water with [this] transplantation,” Pomahac said.The operation was just the second of its kind to be conducted in the United States and among just a handful worldwide. Since the first partial face transplant in 2005, similar procedures have been performed in France, China, and at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio.The recipient of the world’s first face transplant, Isabelle Dinoire, a French woman who had been mauled by a dog, visited Maki at the hospital recently. Leaders of the Brigham team had met Dinoire before, when they traveled to France in preparation for Maki’s surgery.Pomahac said it is likely that more such surgeries will be performed. He estimated there are several hundred people in the United States who could benefit — including more than 100 wounded soldiers. Face transplant surgery, he said, could become an infrequent but regular procedure performed in extraordinary cases.“Right now I strongly believe this is a way to treat the worst facial deformities,” Pomahac said.The Brigham has had a pioneering role in the history of transplantation. The first ever organ transplant was performed there in 1954 when Joseph Murray, today a professor of surgery emeritus at Harvard Medical School, transplanted a kidney from one brother to another. Murray won the 1990 Nobel Prize in medicine for his work on organ transplantation. In 2006 alone, more than 100 kidney transplants and 30 lung transplants were performed there.last_img read more

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Elimination looms as Truck Series drivers face Talladega

first_imgTALLADEGA, Ala. — With its high banking, speed and lurking potential for the “Big One,” Talladega Superspeedway is NASCAR’s largest — and arguably, one of the most daunting — tracks on the circuit.For Brad Keselowski Racing driver Chase Briscoe, coming here feels like “a lottery.” Throw in the fact that Saturday’s fred’s 250 at the superspeedway takes the Camping World Truck Series Playoffs field from eight to six, and that’s enough to unnerve even the most veteran of drivers.Let alone a rookie.“It’s as nerve-wracking as can be,” Briscoe said of Talladega on Friday. “I think here and Daytona are the two most nervous places I go to. I’m not going to sit here and act like I’m all tough. It is scary … because you do know what can happen, you know there’s going to be a huge wreck — you’ve just got to hope and pray that you aren’t in it.”In Briscoe’s lone restrictor-plate start earlier this season at Daytona International Speedway, he finished third. But even a finish like that doesn’t give him much solace.“I don’t think you can really lean on comfort from past success here because so much can happen,” he said. “It’s not so much as what you do as a driver here as it is just if you’re fortunate or not to make it through the wrecks … I think you’ve just got to go out there and be praying the whole race that you don’t get caught up.”Briscoe sits fifth in the current playoff standings, his Brad Keselowski Racing teammate Austin Cindric just behind him in sixth. Only eight points separate Cindric from the cutoff spot. Above them are locked-in winners Christopher Bell and Ben Rhodes, as well as Matt Crafton and Johnny Sauter.“I don’t think you could say that anyone’s comfortable, especially if you’re right around the cutoff line,” Briscoe said. “You look at how stage points are seriously affecting how the playoffs work; I mean, Chase is 10 above, I’m 8 above. And you can easily (earn) 10 or so on guys just by how you’re running in the pack.”GMS Racing’s Kaz Grala is seventh now, while John Hunter Nemechek rounds out the field in eighth. The NEMCO Motorsports driver certainly hopes stage points will bode well for his chances, as he’s currently 14 points behind Cindric.“We have some points to make up,” Nemechek said. “The stage points definitely play a factor into this year — if this was last year, it would be a must-win situation. … We’re just going to stay out and do the best we can. We stayed a lot at the shop this week, late nights working on our truck making sure that everything that’s in our control we eliminated all mistakes.“So, we just have to run our race, hopefully run up front, win stages and win the race.”last_img read more

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Kurt Busch: ‘We’re in negotiations’ on 2018 contract

first_imgRELATED: Key players in NASCAR’s Silly SeasonFORT WORTH, Texas — Fresh off his Coors Light Pole Award-winning run at Texas Motor Speedway, Kurt Busch offered a short statement on his contract status for beyond 2017.“No updates from me,” Busch said. “We’re in negotiations so days like today help quite a bit.”Stewart-Haas Racing co-owner Tony Stewart chimed in on the ongoing talks about the future of the No. 41 team on Sunday after SHR’s Kevin Harvick prevailed in the AAA Texas 500. Stewart noted that the organization plans to announce Tuesday the 2018 replacement for Danica Patrick in its No. 10 Ford; SHR has fielded Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series entries for Harvick, Busch, Patrick and Clint Bowyer in its four-car campaign this year.“We’re still working through all that, but obviously it’s pretty busy right now,” Stewart said. “Obviously, we’re going to have a big announcement next week for the 10 car and we’re still working on the 41 right now. But that’s our goal is to have Kurt back in that car for next year.”Busch posted a fast lap of 200.915 mph in the final round of group qualifying to notch his 22nd pole of his career. The 39-year-old Las Vegas native, who won the season-opening Daytona 500 in Ford’s first race with SHR in the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series, qualified for the 2017 Playoffs but failed to advance past the Round of 16.Busch confirmed that he was a free agent in August after SHR reportedly declined his contract option. The team tweeted out at the time that Busch was expected to return to the organization in 2018.RELATED: SHR expects Busch back in ’18 | Busch ‘optimistic’ about futureIn 18 seasons thus far, Busch won the 2004 championship and has 29 wins at the sport’s top level. In four seasons at SHR, Busch has five wins and has qualified for NASCAR’s postseason in each season with the Tony Stewart-Gene Haas owned organization.Contributing: Staff reportslast_img read more

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