Sierra Club List of Successes in 2009

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThe Sierra Club, its volunteers, supporters, and petitions, helped demand progress in conservation policies across the U.S. in 2009. Here are some of the big successes by the numbers:     * 26 coal-fired power plants were abandoned or defeated     * Congress protected two million acres of new parks, wilderness areas, and wild rivers     * The grizzly bear earned greater protection     * Tens of thousands of actions were taken leading to key climate-change rulings in DC, like tougher auto efficiency standards.     * The Obama administration ruled that greenhouse gases threaten public health and should be regulated     * The Sierra Club held nearly 1,000 house parties for the Coal Country documentary, and called for an end to mountaintop-removal coal mining.     * The Sierra Club took 90,000 kids fishing, thanks to partnerships with the Federation of Fly Fishers and Trout Unlimited. Watch the Sierra Club celebrate the 2009 successes in this video via YouTube… AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Read More →

Anthropology professor’s study analyzes Irish immigration

first_imgIan Kuijt, professor of anthropology at Notre Dame, presented his findings regarding the importance of the hearth and its connection to the narrative of Irish immigration in the Snite Museum of Art on Saturday.Kuijt’s research, titled “The Empty Hearth: Archeological Insights into Irish America,” centered on the documentation and analysis of archeological findings on Inishark, an island located approximately eight miles off the coast of the mainland and abandoned in 1960 in less than 24 hours.The hearth is a fundamental concept in Irish narrative, Kuijt said.“The hunts, the home and the life within the home, is centered on the hearth and the kitchen itself,” Kuijt said. “I’ve used the metaphor of the hearth, as a context under which we can think about histories, stories and narratives of memory. I want to think in terms of personal stories and personal changes at the small scale, and trying to think in some ways about the archeology of the famine within the context of the changes that take place in communities.”Kuijt said the evidence found in the hearths provide insight into the complex stories of families facing the impacts of mass emigration from such a remote island.“It is both horribly interconnected with the mainland, yet it is very separate”, Kuijt said. “In some ways, they take very different trajectories, and these trajectories are very powerful in terms of understanding the immigrant experience, understanding the mobility of people between islands and understanding the mobility towards America.”According to Kuijt, the study’s record of the position and state of Inishark’s buildings as well as the presence of valuable remnants of ceramics and pottery suggest that the island’s inhabitants were well connected. Kuijt said the remains in the hearths also reveal population and housing trends on the island leading up to its abandonment.“These are interesting buildings, first of all because they are rarely preserved; second of all, because they provide this sort of hybrid technology, well-made technology for this point in time”, Kuijt said. “This is a place that’s largely viewed as being a marginal context, yet this is showing us that these people had access to trade markets. There are all kinds of interconnections.”Kuijt’s research documented descendants of the families whose hearths he originally examined, he said. The remains of the hearths and the stories of Inishark’s descendant’s revealed the sacrifice and fragmentation present in the process of immigration, indicating that the abandonment of Inishark had a lasting and profound impact on newer generations.“The big picture out of all of that is that when you think about what’s gone on, these are stories of survivorship, of people surviving under very adverse circumstances,” Kuijt said. “Some of the most powerful stories we can think of is that this is the human condition — of people overcoming circumstance for the next generation.”Tags: Irish Studies, Saturday Scholars, Snite Museum of Artlast_img read more

Read More →

NAHBS 2012 – Paul Brodie’s Whippet, Victoria, Ventus, Dominguez & Pitz

first_imgVictoria CyclesThe name Victoria Cycles’ may conjure up historic posters of pinup girls on bikes, but the modern incarnation is named after builder Dave Hill’s wife. His bikes are brazed and lugged steel and often feature curved and/or twin tubes. A couple that caught my eye were the classic tandem above and mountain bike below.VentusVentus Cycles’ builder Mark Kargol builds titanium bikes alongside custom paint work for frames, components and helmets. This road bike sported a very classic look thanks to excellent component selection, but the frame is thoroughly modern and the drivetrain is brand new…it’s a current generation Campagnolo group polished to match the retro theme. Paul Brodie’s Whippet caught plenty of eyeballs. It’s a replica 1888 Whippet bicycle, designed with seven pivot points to help insulate the rider from road shock before the invention of pneumatic tires. Lots of photos and the story, plus bikes from Victoria, Ventus, Dominguez and Pitz, further down…center_img DominguezVincent Dominguez had a few interesting bits on his lone display bike, like flattened chainstays right at the rear……dual seat post bolts and some long internal shift cable tunnels springing out of the downtube.Pitz!Pitz! is a small Italian builder that works solely with steel. Their road bike was fairly straightforward with a small flourish to accentuate their logo:last_img read more

Read More →

Odds & Ends: Joel Grey to Sign & Chat About His New Photography Book & More

first_imgJoel Grey(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser for Broadway.com) View Comments Here’s a quick roundup of stories you might have missed today.Joel Grey to Sign & Chat About His New Photography BookTony and Oscar winner Joel Grey, the Fiddler on the Roof director who also happens to be a celebrated photographer, will take part in a conversation about his new book, The Flower Whisperer, at the NYC book store Rizzoli on July 25 at 6:00pm. The event will feature Grey being interviewed by his friend, acclaimed photographer Duane Michals, followed by a signing. Grey’s book captures his life-long love for nature’s beauty, with an array of images featuring lilies, tulips, roses and poppies. For further details on Thursday’s book signing, click here.Norm Lewis to Headline New York Pops Underground Cabaret ConcertTony nominee Norm Lewis has been selected as the star of the 2019 annual cabaret fundraiser of The New York Pops. The event, hosted by music director Steven Reineke, will be held at Feinstein’s/54 Below on September 23 at 5:30pm. Lewis is a Broadway veteran who earned a Tony nomination for his turn in Porgy & Bess; he also broke ground as the first African-American actor to play the title role in the Broadway production of The Phantom of the Opera. Proceeds from the fundraiser will support The New York Pops orchestra and PopsEd music programs, which reach more than 5,000 New York City students each year throughout the five boroughs of New York City.Claybourne Elder & Eric Rosen to Host Broadway Daddies Fundraiser for About Face Youth TheatreBroadway actor Claybourne Elder (Torch Song) and his husband, director Eric Rosen, have signed on to emcee Broadway Daddies, an upcoming fundraiser concert for About Face Youth Theatre, set to appear at Feinstein’s/54 Below on August 26 at 9:30pm. Elder and Rosen, who are fathers to two-year-old Bo, will headline an evening celebrating all the ways Broadway dads navigate show schedules, rehearsals, out-of-town tryouts, diapers, daycare, first words and college graduations—not to mention competitive dad jokes. The evening will feature songs and stories from Broadway’s hit shows and beloved performers, who happen to be fathers, including Tony nominee Bryce Pinkham (The Great Society), Ben Thompson (Waitress), Jack Noseworthy (Come From Away), Michael Williams (My Fair Lady), Cleve Asbury (How to Succeed), Raymond J. Lee (Groundhog Day), Andrew Kober (Beautiful) and Kevin Massey (Memphis). Rosen will direct the evening, which will feature music direction by Rodney Bush.Janine LaManna & More to Join SNL’s Heidi Gardner for Noises Off at Cape PlayhouseFull casting has been announced for the Cape Playhouse’s upcoming staging of Michael Frayn’s iconic farce Noises Off. The previously announced production, directed by Jeffry Denman, will run from August 7-17 at the historic theater on Cape Cod. New to the cast is Janine LaManna (Seussical) as Belinda, Craig Wesley Divino (Happy Birthday, Wanda Jane) as Tim, Taylor Galvin (The Marvelous Wonderettes) as Poppy, David Patterson (Les Liaisons Dangereuses) as Frederick, John Scherer (Sunset Boulevard) as Garry, Jeremy Webb (Burn This) as Lloyd and Philip Goodwin (The School for Scandal) as Selsdon. They join the previously announced Heidi Gardner (Saturday Night Live) as Brooke Ashton and Jennifer Cody (The Pajama Game) as Dotty.Robert Cuccioli, Teresa Avia Lim to Lead Off-Broadway’s Caesar and CleopatraGingold Theatrical Group has announced casting for its rare revival of George Bernard Shaw’s comedy Caesar and Cleopatra, set to arrive off-Broadway this fall. Artistic Director David Staller will helm the production, slated to begin previews on September 3 and open on September 24 for a limited engagement through October 12​​ at Theatre Row. Heading the cast in the title roles will be Tony nominee Robert Cuccioli and Teresa Avia Lim; they’ll be joined by Tony nominee Brenda Braxton, Claybourne Elder, Rajesh Bose, Dan Domingues and Jonathan Hadley. One of Shaw’s most famous and least known plays, Caesar and Cleopatra hasn’t been given a full NYC production in more than 40 years.last_img read more

Read More →

Children Want Factual Stories, Versus Fantasy, More Often Than Adults

first_imgNPR:Childhood is a time for pretend play, imaginary friends and fantastical creatures. Flying ponies reliably beat documentaries with the preschool set.Yet adults are no strangers to fiction. We love movies and novels, poems and plays. We also love television, even when it isn’t preceded by “reality.So, what happens as we make our way from childhood to adulthood? Do we ever reallyoutgrow a childlike predilection for make-believe? Or does our fascination with fiction and fantasy simply find new forms of expression?In a paper published earlier this year, psychologists Jennifer Barnes, Emily Bernstein and Paul Bloom set out to compare children’s and adults’ preferences for fact versus fiction in stories. Their results are surprising — and reveal something important about why we’re so drawn to fiction in the first place.Read the whole story: NPR More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

Read More →

X-ray to study micronutrients in human minibrains

first_imgShare LinkedIn Simone Cardoso, Associate Professor at the Institute of Physics at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, highlights the interdisciplinary nature of the study, which involved biologists and physicists. “This allows us to gather a wide range of scientific expertise to plan and perform the experiments”.The minibrains were up to 45-days old. The authors described the distribution of nutrients in two different stages of development: an initial one, of intense cellular proliferation (day 30); and at a second time point, when cells start to become neurons and organize themselves into layers (day 45).The results show that the concentration and distribution of micronutrients are related to the stage of development and similar to previous data obtained from postmortem brain samples.It is very clear that mothers’ diet during pregnancy has long-term effects on fetal development. The observed nutrients are essential for the appropriate formation of the brain. The lack of some of them during prenatal development is also related to memory deficits and psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. “This study reinforces how important minibrains can be as a model to investigate several aspects of brain development”, says Stevens Rehen, the principal investigator of the study and a researcher working at the D’ Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR) and at the Institute of Biomedical Sciences at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. Email Pinterestcenter_img Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Micronutrients and minerals play a key role during human fetal development. A study published in PeerJ this week describes the composition and distribution of some elements in human minibrains created in the lab.Until today, the study of nutrients in brains was restricted to postmortem or non-human tissue. Human brain organoids – tiny tridimensional structures created from human stem cells in vitro – helped to understand the dynamics of nutrients during neurodevelopment.Researchers analyzed human brain organoids, also known as minibrains, by synchrotron radiation, a sort of X-ray that allows the identification of the atomic composition of micronutrients. This technique consists of exciting tissue samples in order to quantify the unique photon signature of each atom. In doing so, they described how phosphorus, sulfur, potassium, calcium, iron and zinc are distributed during brain formation.last_img read more

Read More →

Human brain networks developing in adolescence related to evolutionary expansion

first_imgEmail Share on Twitter Share LinkedIn Pinterestcenter_img Adolescence marks not only the period of physical maturation bridging childhood and adulthood, but also a crucial period for remodeling of the human brain. A Penn study reveals new patterns of coordinated development in the outer layer of the cerebrum of the human brain and describes how these structural patterns relate to functional networks.The team found the convergence between structural and functional networks was inversely related to functional complexity. Motor, sensory, visual and functional networks aligned to distinct structural networks. This unique representation of brain maturation may open new opportunities for future studies into many psychiatric disorders that might begin during this age. A team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania publishes the findings this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Brain remodeling during adolescence supports the tuning of behavior and cognitive abilities, including reasoning, coordination, decision making, motivation, and regulation of emotions. Measuring these brain parameters during development is valuable for understanding both normal brain maturation and abnormalities associated with behavioral problems and psychiatric disorders. In contrast to the small sample sizes in this subject area’s previous research, this cohort of 934 youths ages 8-22 from the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort, a collaboration between Penn Medicine and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (led by Raquel E. Gur, MD, PhD, a professor of Psychiatry) offers the opportunity to evaluate these complex patterns of brain development. Share on Facebook Many previous studies have examined the structure and function of the brain, but there has been a gap between brain imaging studies and the biological processes that drive the development of brain networks. This team took high-dimensional, complex data that would otherwise be tough to understand – and boiled it down to a limited number of developing structural brain networks (18 in total).“In an era of big, complex data, it’s sometimes difficult to see what’s going on,” said Christos Davatzikos, PhD, professor of Radiology, and senior author on the paper. “So you look at this data and think there may be some relationships, but our brain and visual interpretation can only go so far. Now we have powerful multivariate methods that can put all the data together and see deeper what’s behind it, and find patterns never seen before.”To look deeper into these patterns of brain development, the team used a sophisticated technique called non-negative matrix factorization, to simultaneously analyze complex patterns of brain structure and identify patterns of development in adolescence. Unlike previous brain representations that relied on patterns of ridges and folds on the surface of the brain, called gyri and sulci, the team looked at how elements change together in a coordinated fashion.This approach revealed a set of structural brain networks that have clear functional and evolutionary significance. Indeed, the degree to which these structural networks change in adolescence is related to the rate of evolution, as measured by the expansion of the cortical areas, from the brain of a monkey.“The most plastic parts of the brain that change during adolescence are also those that make us most human,” said Theodore D. Satterthwaite, MD, assistant professor of Psychiatry and equally contributing senior author on the paper. “Without this method, we couldn’t see these coordinated patterns of change.”“Looking at the brain in a data-driven way, we see systematic relationships between certain regions,” said Aristeidis Sotiras, PhD, a research associate and first author on the paper. “This allows us to identify the moving parts of the brain, which opens new avenues for research into an individual’s risk for developing specific diseases based on understanding how these parts get broken during adolescence.”Similar to the use of height and weight growth charts in pediatrics, looking at which brain regions change significantly compared to a normal development baseline, could show how vulnerable someone is to a specific disorder. Deviations of processes that drive development and affect structural networks could lead to psychiatric disorders. Next, the team hopes to study the association between clinical symptoms and specific brain patterns.last_img read more

Read More →

Four groups get Longitude funds for point-of-care tests

first_imgThe Longitude Prize has named the latest winners of funding for the development of point-of-care diagnostic tests that will conserve antibiotics.The United Kingdom–based seed funding program, launched in 2014 to address the problem of antibiotic overuse and resistance, announced this week that four teams from India won the third round of Discovery Award funding, with each team receiving awards from £10,000 to £25,000 ($13,355 to $33,388) to work toward prototype development and validation of their tests. The Longitude Prize has now awarded funding to 29 different teams from around the world.Three teams focus on sepsisThree of the newly awarded teams are developing tests that could help reduce morbidity and mortality due to sepsis, a condition that occurs when the body’s reaction to infection triggers an inflammatory response throughout the body. IDI Group is developing an ultrasensitive magnetic biosensor to rapidly detect and identify endotoxins in the blood, an innovation that could help clinicians treat sepsis in its early stages and choose the right antibiotic therapy.NanoDX Healthcare is evaluating Septiflo, a low-cost, disposable kit that can detect bacteria in a drop of blood in under 10 minutes and stratify patients based on whether the bacterial infection is caused by a gram-negative or a gram-positive pathogen. The company says the device is intended for use in rural and urban settings and doesn’t require trained physicians or a microbiology laboratory.SpotSense is conducting validation of a non-invasive, sputum-based test for diagnosing neonatal sepsis, which accounts for nearly a quarter of all newborn deaths in India. The device tests for levels of sepsis biomarkers in neonatal saliva and then uses an algorithm to calculate a sepsis score. The team says the device can also be used to evaluate severity and guide antibiotic therapy and can be utilized by nurses or midwives without the need of a pathology lab.Companion AST, or cAST, is developing a new imaging device to perform rapid point-of-care diagnosis of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in urinary tract infections. The low-cost imaging tool generates antibiotic susceptibility reports directly from urine samples.Discovery Award funding is intended to help researchers develop their ideas and compete for the Longitude Prize, which will be awarded to the team that can develop a transformative point-of-care test that will improve antibiotic treatment decisions—and help conserve antibiotics—by either ruling out unnecessary antibiotic use or identifying the most effective antibiotic. The test needs to be accurate, affordable, rapid, easy-to-use in all global healthcare settings, and ready for clinical performance trials.Winners of the Longitude Prize will receive £8 million ($10.7 million).  See also:Dec 20 Longitude Prize blog postlast_img read more

Read More →

PEEC: Registration Opens For Kids Outdoor Clubs

first_imgPEEC is offering two small-group clubs Forest Explorers and Art in Nature Club for kids in 1st, 2nd and 3rd grades. Sign up for today at peecnature.org/events. Courtesy/PEECPEEC News:Get your kids outside this October with the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC).Space is available in both of PEEC’s outdoor clubs, Forest Explorers and Art in Nature Club. Both programs are for students in 1st, 2nd and 3rd grades and will meet once a week. Forest Explorers will meet 1-4 p.m. Wednesdays, starting Oct. 7 and ending Oct. 28. This 3-hour drop-off program provides the opportunity for kids to go on hikes from the Los Alamos Nature Center for self-directed play in the canyons, creeks and surrounding forest. Children will build forts, make observations and learn to identify different plants and animals. The program encourages children to have fun while working cooperatively, building gross motor skills and learning more about the local ecology.Art in Nature Club is a partnership between PEEC and Fuller Lodge Art Center. This club will meet 4-6 p.m. Tuesdays, starting Oct. 6 and ending Oct. 27. Children will gather in small groups to do nature-based art projects outdoors at the nature center. Participants will use natural materials as media and inspirations to create art while connecting with nature and each other. “This week’s PEEC camp has been positively therapeutic and very enjoyable for my child. He’s raved about the instructor and the handful of kids he’s met,” said the parent of one of PEEC’s small-group summer camp participants.Visit peecnature.org/events to learn more about each club, read specific guidelines and sign up! Space is limited in both programs, so please register soon. PEEC staff members are following recommendations from the New Mexico Department of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Camp Association, Association for Nature Center Administrators and many other organizations to develop COVID-safe practices for programs.By staying in small groups, avoiding mixing, wearing face coverings, maintaining physical distance and implementing strict health guidelines for participants and staff, PEEC aims to avoid spreading the virus. During registration, families will be asked to read and agree to a waiver statement.In addition to small group clubs, PEEC continues to offer a variety of virtual events to help our community connect with nature. Tune in for weekly nature programs, astronomy talks, yoga classes and more. On PEEC’s blog are a variety of articles, activities and virtual field trips to do at home. Learn more by visiting peecnature.org. Art in Nature Club for kids in 1st, 2nd and 3rd grades. Sign up at peecnature.org/events. Courtesy/PEECForest Explorers Club for kids in 1st, 2nd and 3rd grades. Sign up at peecnature.org/events. Courtesy/PEEClast_img read more

Read More →

General Parts Inc. Names Dale Ward EVP, Marketing and Merchandising

first_imgRALEIGH, N.C. – General Parts Inc. (GPI) has named Dale Ward executive vice president, marketing and merchandising reporting directly to President Temple Sloan, III.   AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Prior to joining GPI, Ward was executive vice president of operations for CSK Auto in Phoenix, Ariz. During his time with CSK, he held executive positions in marketing, store operations, commercial operations, merchandising and marketing. He drove strategic improvements at CSK including Pro-shop design and implementation, divisional layout and expansion and the company’s core structure. Prior to CSK, Ward served as executive vice president and chief operating officer for Orchard Supply Hardware in San Jose, Calif. From 1993 to 1995, he was president and chief executive officer of F&M Super Drug Stores headquartered in Warren, Mich.   “Dale’s experience makes him the right person for this key leadership position,” said Sloan. “With more than 35 years of experience, he has headed numerous acquisitions, reorganizations and negotiations and has held senior executive level positions in retail store operations, commercial operations and sales and merchandising and marketing.”  For more information about CARQUEST, visit: www.CARQUEST.com.last_img read more

Read More →