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ATA BOARD VACANCY

first_imgThe ATA would like to advise all members and interested parties that there is a position vacant on the ATA Board of Directors. With this in mind the Chairman of the Board is seeking expressions of interest from interested parties. Please read the attached document for all of the information. INFORMATION ON EXPRESSION OF INTEREST FOR BOARD VACANCYlast_img

It’s time to get your social strategy in order

first_imgIf you’re still not sure what your organization should be doing with social media, it would be a good idea to figure it out soon. As social media use continues to grow, this channel is becoming even more important to online donors as a way to connect with causes and find news and information.Here are some social media fun facts: Free WebinarWant some help with your nonprofit’s social media strategy? Nonprofit communication expert Farra Trompeter of Big Duck will join us on Tuesday, October 22, 2013 at 1pm EDT for a free Network for Good webinar. Farra is a seasoned fundraising and nonprofit marketing professional who has helped hundreds of nonprofits create amazing campaigns and communicate more effectively via social channels. This is a perfect opportunity to learn from one of the best. Registration is free and I hope you can join us. (Note: If you can’t attend the live stream, we’ll send you the presentation so you can review it on demand.)Develop Your Social Media StrategyTuesday, October 22nd, 2013 1 pm EDT 27% of online time is now spent on social networking. Source: Experian Tweet this stat.47% of those 45 and younger in the U.S. say social media is more valuable than search for discovering news. Source: Reuters Tweet this stat.Thanks to recent algorithm changes, Google now uses many social factors as top criteria for ranking search results. Source: Searchmetrics Tweet this fact.Twitter’s fastest growing age demographic is 55 to 64 year olds. Source: Global Web Index Tweet this stat.last_img read more

Maternal Morbidities in the Journal of Population, Health and Nutrition

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on July 5, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The June issue of the Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition published by our colleagues at icddr,b focuses on the neglected issue of maternal morbidities.Introducing the issue, Mary Ellen Stanton and Neal Brandes of USAID write:This series of papers presents, for the first time in two geographic areas, a comprehensive snapshot of the short- and long-term consequences of acute maternal morbidity. The icddr,b surveillance site in Matlab, Bangladesh, has a unique set of records of the reproductive health of individual women that provide data accumulated for decades. This was selected as an ideal site to draw upon the database to examine retrospectively long-term and prospectively selected short-term consequences of maternal ill-health. This is the first attempt to obtain greater precision on the consequences of maternal ill-health, using a robust methodology and an extensive dataset, with added qualitative studies and postpartum physical examinations of women following childbirth. In addition, we have included a study that provides contrasting and additional information from Action Research and Training for Health in rural Rajasthan, India.In an editorial, Marge Koblinsky et al. note how little we currently know about maternal morbidities:While the estimates of maternal mortality and its consequences are built on relatively limited data, women who suffer from direct obstetric complications that kill—obstructed or prolonged labour, puerperal sepsis, septic abortion, severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, and postpartum haemorrhage—are estimated to be far higher in number yet less well-documented. The global estimates range from 15% of pregnant women suffering from complications—about 20 million women annually—to 1-2% in resource-poor settings when the definition is restricted to the most severe morbidities.Even less is known about the numbers and description of the consequences women may suffer as a result of pregnancy and childbirth and the life threatening obstetric complications. These consequences—maternal morbidities or disabilities—are estimated to affect 15-20 million women worldwide each year.The other papers published in the issue explore:the types and severities of maternal morbidities in Matlab and Chandpur, Bangladesh;social, economic, and cultural factors associated with maternal morbidities;perceptions and consequences of cesarean births;psychological well-being during pregnancy;physical and emotional violence against women with maternal disabilities;the impact of maternal morbidities on child development;the economic cost of maternal morbidities;community-based methods for understanding maternal morbidities; andthe physical, economic, and psychological consequences of morbidities in the first year postpartum.Share this:last_img read more

New MDG Report Highlights the Need to Invest in Girls, Women and Youth

first_imgShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:,The MDG report draws from official statistics to provide up-to-date summary data on each target at global and regional levels, with country-level data available online. There is much to celebrate: maternal and child mortality rates have dropped, and fewer people are dying from HIV, malaria and tuberculosis than ever before. After two years of steady decreases in development aid, official development assistance hit a record high of $134.8 billion in 2013. However, aid has been redirected away from the poorest countries where it is needed most. This trend will need to be reversed in order to see future progress.Despite declines in maternal deaths, almost 300,000 women continue to die each year during pregnancy and childbirth, and largely from preventable causes. Access to family planning has been identified as a life-saving, cost-effective intervention, yet more than 220 million women in the developing world still have an unmet need for modern contraceptives. Adolescent girls are particularly at risk, with 117 out of every 1000 adolescent girls in sub-Saharan Africa giving birth in 2011.Given this, it is critical that girls and women are prioritized and have a voice in planning the new sustainable development goals. Women Deliver Young Leader Esther Agbarake, Co-Founder of the Youth Climate Coalition, spoke today at the High-Level segment of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) of the United Nations and drove home the importance of engaging with youth.“For young people to also make successful transition to adulthood, they need access to affordable and quality adolescent-and-youth friendly health services and information,” she told the high-level participants. “It is, therefore, imperative that the issues of governance and participation, health including reproductive and sexual health and rights, peacebuilding and security as they relate to young people are reflected in the new development framework… Young people can and are providing the answers, ideas and innovations that can drive sustainable development and produce solutions to today’s greatest challenges. This requires the meaningful participation of young people in governance and decision-making processes across all levels.”Read the Press ReleaseRead the Report The MDG report draws from official statistics to provide up-to-date summary data on each target at global and regional levels, with country-level data available online. There is much to celebrate: maternal and child mortality rates have dropped, and fewer people are dying from HIV, malaria and tuberculosis than ever before. After two years of steady decreases in development aid, official development assistance hit a record high of $134.8 billion in 2013. However, aid has been redirected away from the poorest countries where it is needed most. This trend will need to be reversed in order to see future progress.Despite declines in maternal deaths, almost 300,000 women continue to die each year during pregnancy and childbirth, and largely from preventable causes. Access to family planning has been identified as a life-saving, cost-effective intervention, yet more than 220 million women in the developing world still have an unmet need for modern contraceptives. Adolescent girls are particularly at risk, with 117 out of every 1000 adolescent girls in sub-Saharan Africa giving birth in 2011.Given this, it is critical that girls and women are prioritized and have a voice in planning the new sustainable development goals. Women Deliver Young Leader Esther Agbarake, Co-Founder of the Youth Climate Coalition, spoke today at the High-Level segment of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) of the United Nations and drove home the importance of engaging with youth.“For young people to also make successful transition to adulthood, they need access to affordable and quality adolescent-and-youth friendly health services and information,” she told the high-level participants. “It is, therefore, imperative that the issues of governance and participation, health including reproductive and sexual health and rights, peacebuilding and security as they relate to young people are reflected in the new development framework… Young people can and are providing the answers, ideas and innovations that can drive sustainable development and produce solutions to today’s greatest challenges. This requires the meaningful participation of young people in governance and decision-making processes across all levels.”Read the Press ReleaseRead the Reportcenter_img Posted on July 9, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This article originally appeared on the Women Deliver blog on July 7th, 2014Since their implementation fourteen years ago, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have made critical strides, yet challenges remain for girls, women and young people, says a new report released today by the United Nations. The Millennium Development Goals Report 2014 shows that while some MDG targets have been met, including the reduction of extreme poverty by half, other critical targets such as MDG 5—the reduction of maternal mortality by 75%—remain far off course. The report indicates that large-scale progress is possible, but only with sufficient funding and data to address staggering inequalities.last_img read more

WHO Releases World Malaria Report 2014

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Share this: Posted on December 9, 2014November 2, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Today, WHO released the annual World Malaria Report for 2014. This report reviews the state of malaria throughout the world and also provides 98 country profiles detailing epidemiologic, policy, financing, intervention coverage, and impact information.Preventing malaria through intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) remains a key strategy and appears in the Roll Back Malaria objectives and targets for 2015. The key indicator for IPTp remains the same: the proportion of women who received at least three or more doses of IPTp during ANC visits during their last pregnancy.The report also summarizes the state of national IPTp policies. Country profiles state whether or not an IPTp policy is in place and, if so, when it was adopted. In addition, the report details the number of new IPTp policies adopted in 2013: a total of 37 new policies were adopted, 34 of which occurred in the African Region. Lastly, for each country the report recommends if policies should be adopted on either IPTp or seasonal malarial chemoprevention and summarizes the current antimalarial drug policies for IPTp.Check out the full report!last_img read more

New Lancet Commentary Makes Link Between Ebola and Women’s Health

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 22, 2015October 28, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Ebola epidemic that is currently ravaging Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea has devastated these nations and their health systems. While Ebola’s destruction has reached far beyond the health system into other critical sectors, it is without a doubt women and their children who are suffering the greatest burden of this disease and its effects.Today, The Lancet published a commentary that describes the socioeconomic, biologic and health systems connections between women’s health and the current Ebola epidemic. Ana Langer, Director of the MTHF, joined with her colleagues at ISGlobal and the Centro de Investigação em Saúde de Manhiça to author the paper, which describes the reasons why the majority of those infected with Ebola are women and how the outbreak has increased the obstacles women face in accessing the health system. The authors expound:First, the worsening of suboptimal access to reproductive and maternal health care in the Ebola crisis countries is posing a major threat to the lives of mothers and infants. Second, women are the primary caregivers in their homes, communities, and health facilities and, as such, assist most infected individuals, which puts them at an increased risk of contracting the virus. Moreover, traditional burial practices, typically performed by women, can also place them at higher risk. Finally, there is evidence of sexual transmission of Ebola after individuals recover from the infection. Since women have little control over sexual behaviour including abstinence or protected sex, this represents an additional source of increased exposure to the virus.Lastly, critical advances in women’s and maternal health care in these countries over recent years has been ravaged by the outbreak. Addressing the current outbreak is critical, but maintaining a focus on strengthening these health systems beyond the outbreak will be critical for ensuring and protecting maternal and child health.Making long-term investments to ensure appropriate care for women and children’s health under normal circumstances and in future crises that will inevitably occur is an ethical and public health imperative that global and national health communities need to embrace urgently. Acting effectively now is a prerequisite to ending the preventable deaths of mothers and children in these settings.The commentary provides many more details about the important connection between Ebola and women’s health. You can find the commentary through The Lancet Global Health.Share this:last_img read more

Donor Experience Virtual Conference for Nonprofits – Don’t be Left Out!

first_imgVirtual Conference – Live StreamingCreating a Nonprofit Donor Experience to Increase Giving and Drive RetentionTuesday, March 27, 2018 | 12:00PM – 4:00PM ET The highly anticipated upcoming Virtual Conference hosted by Network for Good will bring together industry leaders for a robust discussion on the importance of amplifying the donor experience.Register Now to grab one of the few spots left!Great donor experience and engagement generates more giving, keeps donors close, and boots your personal satisfaction level and achievement. It is a win-win! Here are some additional thoughts about donor behaviors: Donors support causes to accomplish their personal missions, not yours!Those who get a great experience when supporting one organization (vs. another, because that’s the choice your donors make—there’s only so much attention and dollars to go around), engage significantly more than someone who doesn’t.That means more donations, but also more volunteering, campaigning, and program participation or advocacy. As your donors get more engaged—and become part of your organization’s family, in a way—the more likely they are to stay close, for the long term. More donations, greater retention. All good!But there’s even more to gain! Engaged donors When your donors are more engaged, they’re far more likely to share their passion with family and friends, expanding your organization’s reach and prospect base with NO ADDITIONAL staff or budget. You couldn’t do the same even if you had the staff and budget, because it’s your donors who have these trusted relationships in place.If your organization has between 100-2500 donors and prospects with contact information and has raised at least $15,000 in the last year from individual donors, ½-day, no-charge,  Virtual Conference will be a real game changer. REGISTER NOW for our Virtual Conference where we will explore this topic in great detail. There’s no better investment in the future of your organization—and in yourself.You’ll learn:The theory and research behind the donor engagement phenomenon (great for building buy in and excitement)How your donors and prospects brains really work, so you work with them, rather than againstFrom the most-experienced experts out there, including a colleague fundraiser who will share his organization’s eye-opening donor engagement story.And you’ll have the opportunity to schedule a one-to-one readiness assessment session with one of our engagement coaches!Don’t miss out: Register today!last_img read more

How to Inspire Donors Across Generations

first_imgThe changing of the guard is as old as time. It can be a bumpy road if you don’t plan for it. The older donor generations can feel pushed out of the very causes they helped launch. Meanwhile, the younger generations cry out for change and inclusion. How do you reach across the generations and bring everyone to the table?Compare the four primary generations of donors—Mature, Boomer, Gen X, Millennial—and you’ll see there’s more that unites us than divides us. Research scientist Jennifer Deal observed similarities in her book, Retiring the Generation Gap: How Employees Young and Old Can Find Common Ground. She found that all generations:Value family, integrity, honesty, trustworthiness.Want respect.Believe leaders must be trustworthy.Like to receive feedback.Don’t like change.Base loyalty on context, not age.Want to learn and better ourselves.In “How to Engage Multiple Generations of Donors,” we explore additional generational insights on giving activity, volunteer rates, tech use, and communication preferences. Incorporate these findings into your donor engagement to create lasting relationships.Generational Communication TipsYour donor’s preferred method of communication doesn’t always depend on their age. Gen X may prefer email and Boomers may prefer a phone call, but they both enjoy receiving a thank you card in the mail. Ask your donors how they prefer to be contacted, record that information in your donor management system, and use it to create a deeper level of engagement.Matures respect authority and respond to tradition and long-term commitment. Highlight your organization’s history and your position as a leader in your field.Boomers are dedicated, hard-working, goal-oriented individuals. They expect quality services and treatment. Put your nonprofit’s work—and your results—front and center. Inspire them with your story and your mission.Gen X donors risk being overlooked in favor of their Boomer and Millennial counterparts. Pay special attention to them today. As they enter the peak years of their careers, many Gen Xers are looking for proactive ways to support organizations they believe in.Millennials are drawn to transparency and access. As donors, they’re interested in more than just their name on a donor list. They want to contribute in different ways. Incorporate more targeted contact and engagement as part of cultivating this generation of donors. Bring them into your work on a deeper level.Never before has there been such a wide array of communication options. From the classic approach of direct mail to the modern invention of instant messaging, each generation has their preference. Use your donor data to create engagement that bridges the generation gap once and for all.Check out our infographic, Bridging The Donor Generation Gap, for more information on generational giving!last_img read more

International Day to End Obstetric Fistula: Ending Fistula Within a Generation

first_imgPosted on May 23, 2016July 11, 2017By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In honor of International Day to End Obstetric Fistula, May 23, we’ve compiled resources related to obstetric fistula, a serious and tragic health condition that impacts the lives of women and families around the world. While the global prevalence rate is not known, estimates suggest that obstetric fistula affects around 2 million women primarily in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. The devastating effects of fistula include incontinence of urine and/or feces, often accompanied by depression, social isolation, and poverty.Fortunately, the condition is usually treatable and preventable. The maternal health community can support this year’s theme of ending fistula within a generation by promoting universal access to high quality emergency obstetric care, treatment, and social support. Photo: “Africa Partnerships Hamlin Fistula 12” © 2009 Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license 2.0Share this: Obstetric Fistula ResourcesDouble Burden of Tragedy: Stillbirth and Obstetric FistulaThis commentary, following The Lancet Stillbirth Series in 2011, draws attention to the highly prevalent link between obstetric fistula and stillbirth.  According to the meta-analysis of obstetric fistula studies published between 1990 and 2015, 90% of pregnancies in which the women develops obstetric fistula result in stillbirth.Good Practices on Ending Obstetric FistulaPublished in 2014, this UNFPA resource shares implementation strategies, progress, and lessons learned from program components and Campaign to End Fistula partner activities. Good Practices describes both challenges and innovations in addressing obstetric fistula.Maternal Health Thematic Fund 2014 ReportThis report examines the impact of UNFPA in ending fistula through the Campaign to End Fistula, one of the main projects of the Maternal Health Thematic Fund. Launched in 2008, the Maternal Health Thematic Fund manages programs in midwifery and emergency obstetric and newborn care that work to prevent and treat fistula. The 2014 report also identifies challenges in fistula prevention.New Research to Shorten Recovery Time For Fistula RepairThis MHTF blog post summarizes findings from Fistula Care Plus Project’s large multi-center randomized controlled trial published in the Lancet, which demonstrated that short duration catheterization is safe and effective following simple fistula repair surgery.Psychological Symptoms and Social Functioning Following Repair of Obstetric Fistula in a Low-Income SettingThis exploratory study identifies changes in psychological symptoms following fistula repair surgery, discharge, and reintegration home among women in rural Tanzania. The authors note the importance of equipping women with coping strategies should they experience residual fistula symptoms.Restoring Hope and Dignity: New Developments and Best Practices in Addressing Maternal MorbiditiesSupported by the MHTF, this Wilson Center event featured a panel presentation of the newest data and best practices from those who work most closely with maternal morbidities like obstetric fistula and pelvic organ prolapse. The speakers discussed root causes of maternal morbidities as well as new approaches and barriers to addressing the global burden of obstetric fistula.Selected Organizations Working to End FistulaCampaign to End FistulaFistula Care Plus Project at EngenderHealthFistula FoundationOperation FistulaDo you have any other resources on obstetric fistula that you’d like to recommend? If so, email us at mhtf@hsph.harvard.edu. We’d love to hear from you!Join the conversation on ending obstetric fistula within a generation using #FistulaDay.center_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Person-Centered Group Antenatal Care in Eastern Uganda: Reaching Women Through Pregnancy Clubs

first_imgPosted on July 18, 2017July 18, 2017By: Kate Ramsey, Senior Principal Technical Advisor for Maternal and Newborn Health, Management Sciences for Health; Shafia Rashid, Senior Technical Advisor, Family Care International (FCI) Program of Management Sciences for HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Women examine cards depicting health information during a pregnancy club session in eastern Uganda. (Photo: Kate Ramsey/MSH)Improving the quality of care that women experience during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period has become a major global priority. Achieving good quality care requires not only clinical improvements, but also a person-centered approach that takes into account women’s and health workers’ needs and perspectives.In 2016, the World Health Organization updated its antenatal care guidelines, calling for a positive pregnancy experience through holistic, person-centered antenatal services that provide pregnant women with emotional support and advice in addition to the standard clinical assessments.Group antenatal care, initially developed in the U.S. several decades ago, is a promising model that responds to women’s health and information concerns during pregnancy. Facilitated by a health provider, usually a nurse or midwife, group antenatal care offers a forum for pregnant women to learn more about their pregnancies, share their experiences, receive essential health and self-care information and provide social and emotional support to each other within the group. Health care providers meet individually with group participants after the group sessions for routine physical and clinical care and to discuss any confidential issues. Group antenatal care can also benefit health care providers through increased job satisfaction without substantially increasing the amount of time required.MSH is testing the feasibility and acceptability of person-centered, group antenatal care in the context of eastern Uganda. Working in collaboration with M4ID, a social impact company specializing in human-centered, innovative solutions to health problems in low-resource settings, we co-designed a pregnancy club model with women and health providers to ensure it met their needs and expectations. M4ID then tested a pregnancy club prototype with women and health providers, and refined the model according to their feedback.Pregnancy club materials include illustrated picture cards, a ball. and a circular mat. (Photo: Kate Ramsey/MSH)Now, health care providers are leading pregnancy clubs in six health facilities. Pregnancy club members begin and end each session with a ritual of opening and closing a simple, circular mat made of local fabric. The women gather around the mat and roll out scrolls containing picture cards of health discussion topics, although the participants may also introduce other topics for discussion. Women pass around a ball, so that everyone has a turn to speak.Preliminary findings from our qualitative research indicate that pregnant women, midwives and district and national Ministry of Health officials really appreciate the benefits of the group sessions. Many of the women described developing lasting friendships with other women and a more trusting bond with the midwife, who–they hoped–would attend their births. Similarly, participating nurses and midwives described stronger relationships with the women. And members from the District Health Management Team regarded the  group sessions as an important improvement in the quality of antenatal care.For more information:Project brief: Innovations in Patient-Centered Antenatal Care: A Pregnancy Club for Women in Eastern UgandaProject webpage: Pregnancy Club: A Model for Group Antenatal CareEvidence reviews of antenatal care and its challenges in low- and middle-income countries:A new look at care in pregnancy: Simple, effective interventions for neglected populations. PLOS One (2016). Stephen Hodgins, James Tielsch, Kristen Rankin, Amber Robinson, Annie Kearns, Jacquelyn Caglia.Barriers and enablers to integrating maternal and child health services to antenatal care in low and middle income countries. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology (Feb 2016). TE de Jongh, I Gurol-Urganci, E Allen, N Jiayue Zhu, R Atun.Antenatal and postnatal care: a review of innovative models for improving availability,accessibility, acceptability and quality of services in low-resource settings. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology (Dec 2015). AD Kearns, JM Caglia, P ten Hoope-Bender, A Langer.What matters to women: a systematic scoping review to identify the processes and outcomes of antenatal care provision that are important to healthy pregnant women. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology (Dec 2015). S Downe, K. Finlayson, Ӧ Tuncalp, A Metin G€ulmezoglu.This post originally appeared on Rights & Realities.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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