China finally setting guidelines for treating lab animals

first_imgIn 2014, China abolished a requirement that domestic cosmetic companies test their products on animals in order to gain approval for sale in the Chinese market. Both animal rights campaigners and consumers had scorned the old regulation, though there remains some confusion on how the current requirements apply to international producers.China’s government has been under increasing pressure to go beyond cosmetics with national standards to cover a large and growing field. According to ILAS, China uses roughly 20 million animals—mostly mice, but also large numbers of dogs, rabbits, and nonhuman primates—each year in research. More than 300,000 people work in the lab animal industry in China.The draft was made public during a conference held in China with Chinese lab animal research groups and the U.K. National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) in London. “It’s encouraging that the 3Rs are right at the forefront of scientific discussions on animal use in research in China,” Mark Prescott, NC3Rs head of research management and policy, said in a statement. He added that for developing scientific powerhouses like China the challenge is to foster awareness of and action on lab animal issues quickly enough to match the growing research investment. China has released its first national standards governing the treatment of laboratory animals, and scientists hope the guidelines will improve both conditions for animals and China’s prospects for international research collaborations.The draft standards were posted last week for public comment and could be implemented by the end of this year. They cover such topics as euthanasia, pain management, transport, and housing. The standards also set requirements for breeding facilities and personnel training. Chinese scientists have said the lack of national regulations has stymied some international collaborations because scientists in other countries can be reluctant to engage in research involving animals if they are not covered by humane protections. In addition, there is growing domestic opposition to the mistreatment of lab animals because of recently documented incidents of abuse.The new standards are based on international best practices, says Qin Chuan, professor of veterinary medicine and director of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences’s Institute of Laboratory Animal Sciences (ILAS) in Beijing. Though China has not had national standards previously, she says, most provinces certify that Chinese labs meet what are essentially globally accepted practices. Qin said national standards are needed bring all labs into line with what is best for the animals.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

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Resource roundup: How behavioral economics makes you better at your job

first_imgI speak a lot about the connection between behavioral economics and our work, and after every speech I get asked for reference materials. People also often email me for a list of my writing on the topic. So I thought I’d pull together in one post all the resources I’ve created. Here’s a mini library on understanding how people really think – and adjusting our marketing, communications and fundraising strategies accordingly.Plus, as a bonus, I’m including this hour-long video from the Science of Communication speaker series run by the Communications Network and Spitfire Strategies. In this video, Harvard behavioral economist Sendhil Mullainathan provides a great overview of how his field applies to you. Speaker Series: The Science of Communication Featuring Sendhil Mullainathan from Communications Network on Vimeo.The Mini LibraryThe best place to start are the two ebooks I’ve written on the topic with Mark Rovner and Alia McKee of SeaChange Strategies:Homer Simpson for Nonprofits: The Truth about How People Think and What It Means to Your CauseLisa Simpson for Nonprofits: What Science Can Teach You About Fundraising, Marketing and Making Social ChangeI also wrote a series of blog posts reviewing the latest research on what compels generous behavior and giving. Here are the best of them:How giving makes you happyWhich makes people happier – giving or receiving?The relationship between giving and painHow pledging eases the pain of parting from our moneyThe power of social norms in givingHow do social norms, price & scrutiny affect what people give?The role of personal connections in fundraising successHow the power of one (the singularity effect) prompts givingThe effect of mood on giving – and who we choose to helpWhat happens when you try to making giving less emotionalSea monkeys and the case for tangibilityInterview with the Science of Giving authorsThe time-ask effectNeuromarketing tips for nonprofits from Roger DooleyBrain tricks to sell your causeYour gut is more generous than your brainEnjoy!last_img read more

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Summertime Shifts: Keep Connecting Through Fireflies, Fireworks, and Family Vacations

first_imgSummer is just different. Even though schooldays ended eons ago for most of us, our focus, attitudes, and readiness to act change as the weather warms.Over the years, I’ve heard from many of you that you feel the same, as do your supporters and prospects. And you’ve asked me how to connect in the context of sizzling summer distractions. This Book Could Change Your Life: Great Summer Reads for Fundraisers Here are three ways to up your summer communications game: Craft your asks to be short, sweet, and personal, like this creative appeal from Food for the Poor, suggests fundraiser Pamela Grow. Nothing is more important than crafting content that’s relevant to your readers. But it’s challenging when they’re distracted by the delights of ice cream, the beach, and after-dinner badminton. What summertime shifts do you make in your fundraising campaigns and communications? Please share in the comments section! Whatever summertime shifts you consider, it’s ideal to base them on what you know about your people, anecdotally and/or via data on last summer’s responses. If possible, measure before and after each shift, and make only one change at a time so you know what does or doesn’t work. Send less frequently. No Friday sends. More Summer Stuffcenter_img Make your content more fun, light, active, and short attention span friendly, advises Kivi Leroux Miller from Nonprofit Marketing Guide. Be aware that you’re communicating to people who are on or just back from vacation, says John Haydon. That could mean sending an email twice (with a fresh subject line the second time), with round two going to those who didn’t open the first, and extending a campaign period into early fall. If you know your people are on email less and Facebook more, follow them where they are. This applies whatever the season. Here’s more summertime shift guidance from some of the best fundraisers and communicators I know: Reboot with These 6 Summer Camp Strategies Shift your topic, tone, and/or language to make it seasonally relevant and fun. Change timing and/or frequency. A quick poll of nonprofit communicators found this to be the most common summertime shift. With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org.last_img read more

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How Your Nonprofit Can Stand Out in an Election Year

first_imgWith debates, caucuses, and primaries flooding the public’s attention, it can feel like it will be even more difficult to connect with donors (and raise funds!) this year. Many nonprofits might wonder if there is a magic formula for standing out during an election year.There is, but it’s more common sense than magic. Nonprofit advisor Joan Garry collected some great insight from fundraising and marketing experts on this very topic. Be sure to check out her recent roundup of advice, which includes my own take on the subject:In 2016, just like every other year, your fundraising appeals and donor communications should seek to strengthen your relationship with supporters. You can do this by speaking to them in a way that is more personal and highly relevant.Here are four ways to better connect with your supporters and stand out in a crowd:Plan consistent, compelling communication.Want to be first in line for a charitable gift? Start now and create a meaningful dialogue with your donors. Regular outreach that evokes the reasons why your supporters care about your work will help build a relationship that will pay off when it comes time to send your next appeal. (Learn how to create your own editorial calendar.)Get the right message to the right donors.Do your campaigns feel generic or custom-made for your donors? Create a basic marketing strategy for each segment of donors based on why, when, and where they give. The more tailored a message, the more it will stand out in a sea of mass communications. This is always important, but will be even more so in 2016. Yes, it’s a little more work, but with the right data and tools, your job will be easier and your results will be significantly better. (Network for Good’s easy-to-use donor management software can help!)Focus on the impact a donor’s gift has—and will have.When you tell the story of how your work gets done, keep your donors at the heart of it. Consider how many  ways you can highlight how your donors make a difference for your cause, your beneficiaries, and your community. Tell authentic stories about your work so your donors can feel their impact come to life.Help donors see themselves in your work and let them feel like part of your team.This is where political campaigns shine, so follow suit. Generate a sense of community with social proof and the leverage the pull of identity. Illustrate these powerful concepts when you ask for a gift through your nonprofit’s donation page or during peer-to-peer fundraising campaigns.last_img read more

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A Decade of Change for Newborn Survival

first_imgPosted on July 30, 2012Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)According to the Healthy Newborn Network, Health Policy and Planning recently published a supplement, A Decade of Change for Newborn Survival, that shares a multi-country analysis of the changes in newborn care and survival from 2000-2010.  The supplement also includes 5 detailed country case studies (Bangladesh, Malawi, Nepal, Pakistan, and Uganda) focused on the process of taking solutions to scale.It was authored by over 60 health experts with contributions from an additional 90 experts and coordinated by Save the Children’s Saving Newborn Lives program. These analyses took over 3 years, using multiple data streams and new approaches to standardizing qualitative data regarding policy and program change.The five detailed country case studies demonstrate that changing the trajectory for newborn survival is possible even in challenging settings when focus is placed on reaching the poorest families with the most effective interventions. Low-income countries, such as Bangladesh, Malawi and Nepal, that are on track to meet the 2015 target of Millennium Development Goal 4 have reduced newborn deaths at about double the rate that their neighbors have…Learn more on the Healthy Newborn Network.The papers in the supplement are open-access and can be accessed through the links below:Newborn survival: changing the trajectory over the next decadeNewborn survival: a multicountry analysis of a decade of changeBenchmarks to measure readiness to integrate and scale up newborn survival interventionsNewborn Survival in BangladeshNewborn Survival in NepalNewborn Survival in PakistanNewborn Survival in MalawiNewborn Survival in UgandaShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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In Urban and Rural India, Study Identifies Harmful and Unnecessary Practices in Health Facilities

first_imgPosted on December 5, 2012November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)A new post, Above All, Do No Harm: The Sad State of Health Care Quality in Rural Madhya Pradesh, on the Center for Global Development Blog offers an informative summary of a recent publication, In Urban And Rural India, A Standardized Patient Study Showed Low Levels Of Provider Training And Huge Quality Gaps, in Health Affairs that explores major challenges with quality of care in public and private health facilities in India.From the blog post:The study finds serious deficits in quality. Interactions between patients and providers were short (3.6 minutes on average) and the emphasis in both sectors was to give several medications to the patient as quickly as possible.Across all cases, the correct treatment protocol was followed 30% of the time, while unnecessary or harmful treatment was prescribed or dispensed 42% of the time. Only one-third of providers articulated a diagnosis, correct or incorrect. When a diagnosis was issued, close to half were wrong, and only 12% were fully correct.What’s going on?Read the full post on the Center for Global Development Blog.Access the full publication in Health Affairs.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

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New Lancet Commentary Makes Link Between Ebola and Women’s Health

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 22, 2015October 28, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Ebola epidemic that is currently ravaging Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea has devastated these nations and their health systems. While Ebola’s destruction has reached far beyond the health system into other critical sectors, it is without a doubt women and their children who are suffering the greatest burden of this disease and its effects.Today, The Lancet published a commentary that describes the socioeconomic, biologic and health systems connections between women’s health and the current Ebola epidemic. Ana Langer, Director of the MTHF, joined with her colleagues at ISGlobal and the Centro de Investigação em Saúde de Manhiça to author the paper, which describes the reasons why the majority of those infected with Ebola are women and how the outbreak has increased the obstacles women face in accessing the health system. The authors expound:First, the worsening of suboptimal access to reproductive and maternal health care in the Ebola crisis countries is posing a major threat to the lives of mothers and infants. Second, women are the primary caregivers in their homes, communities, and health facilities and, as such, assist most infected individuals, which puts them at an increased risk of contracting the virus. Moreover, traditional burial practices, typically performed by women, can also place them at higher risk. Finally, there is evidence of sexual transmission of Ebola after individuals recover from the infection. Since women have little control over sexual behaviour including abstinence or protected sex, this represents an additional source of increased exposure to the virus.Lastly, critical advances in women’s and maternal health care in these countries over recent years has been ravaged by the outbreak. Addressing the current outbreak is critical, but maintaining a focus on strengthening these health systems beyond the outbreak will be critical for ensuring and protecting maternal and child health.Making long-term investments to ensure appropriate care for women and children’s health under normal circumstances and in future crises that will inevitably occur is an ethical and public health imperative that global and national health communities need to embrace urgently. Acting effectively now is a prerequisite to ending the preventable deaths of mothers and children in these settings.The commentary provides many more details about the important connection between Ebola and women’s health. You can find the commentary through The Lancet Global Health.Share this:last_img read more

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Year-End Nonprofit Fundraising: Get Your Ducks in a Row

first_imgThe last six weeks of the calendar year are make or break time for nonprofits.In fact, nearly 30% of nonprofits raise 26-50% of their annual fundraising in November and December – when folks are feeling their most grateful and generous.Nearly a third of all annual giving happens in the single month of December, and 12% of all giving happens in the last three days of that month!You really don’t want to miss out on this most giving time of year!That means going above and beyond simply sending out a single year-end mailed appeal letter.Because once you’ve sent it, and waited a few weeks for responses to come in, that single appeal becomes pretty much a lame duck.If that’s all you’ve got, you’re sunk.If you want to get in on more of that holiday spirit, you must get all your ducks in a row. Now!Let two little words be your mantra:PLAN. AHEAD.Let’s get you some tips that will help you have the best fundraising season ever!Year-End Nonprofit Fundraising Action Tips1. Send Impact Reports to Set the StageIf you’ve not done so already, get ‘quacking’ and send a report to remind donors how they helped. Every donor should get something, even if just a brief email with a photo of someone they helped and a quick “You’re our hero!” or “You did it!” Also consider sending a special thank you gift to donors and volunteers who went above and beyond during the year. I don’t mean anything expensive (that could backfire); thoughtful tokens of appreciation that just say “I’m thinking about you” are welcome, effective and pre-suasive.2. Clean Up Your Prospect DatabaseGet rid of the dead ducks on your mailing list. There’s no sense spending money to mail duplicates and/or deceased and wrong addresses. Ditto to folks who’ve repeatedly demonstrated they aren’t going to support you.TIP: Make sure you do an annual address correction request using a process like NCOA.TIP: Purge prospects and donors who’ve not given for quite some time, if ever. I recommend purging any donors who haven’t given for five years and any prospects who haven’t given for three years. You can archive them for historical purposes if you wish, but stop paying to mail to these folks.Editor’s note: Ask Network for Good about our contact address cleanup service, available with select donor management packages. Click here to schedule a call.3. Establish Priority Goals Based on Last Year’s ResultsLook at retention, upgrades and downgrades from last year and evaluate your areas for improvement. Your database is a potential gold mine when it comes to setting your year-end strategic fundraising objectives. If you don’t focus in on what’s working/what’s not, you’re likely to repeat last year’s results.  And you prefer to exceed them, right?TIP: Consider how you’re doing with various donor segments and other constituencies in terms of retention, upgrades and downgrades: (1) first-time donors; (2) ongoing donors; (3) lapsed donors; (4) multi-gift donors, and (5) upgrades/downgrades.  Also look at how you’re converting volunteers and clients (e.g., parents, patients, ticket buyers, members, subscribers) to financial donors. Create specific strategies designed to improve your results in areas that offer the greatest potential.For more insights into using your data for your year-end campaign, register for this webinar: Fundraising and Technology Insights for Your Year-End Campaigns.4. Prioritize Contacts with Your Most Promising SupportersYou don’t want to lose your sitting ducks. Even folks not on your major donor cultivation list may be among the top 10 – 20% of donors who give you 80 – 90% of your funding.  If you want to keep these folks, build a plan that assures you don’t duck out on them during the time of year they’re most likely to give!TIP: Create a list of LYBNTs (gave last year but not this). Sort them according to dollar range, so you can prioritize contacts with the largest donors. You’re going to want to remind these folks of their generous past support (thank them!) and let them know they’ve still got time to renew and make a difference this year.TIP: Make sure to evaluate folks based on cumulative annual giving. A $100/month donor is not a $100 donor, but a $1,200 donor. When you sort based on most recent gift, you’ll miss these important loyal supporters.TIP: Don’t overlook Peer-to-Peer fundraisers who bring in significant gift totals.  These folks can be the functional equivalent of major donors, and you want to be sure to put in place strategies to encourage their continued engagement and investment.TIP: Don’t overlook volunteers. Research by Neon CRM shows volunteers are twice as likely as non-volunteers to donate. Sometimes, they simply aren’t asked well. Consider making them a separate campaign segment, and send them a tailored appeal that recognizes their already generous contribution to your cause.5. Prepare a Year-End Email SeriesThis will not only bring in gifts on its own, it will also bolster your offline campaign by reminding folks they intended to give. You want to send enough emails to maximize your chances during this most heavy giving period of the year. Did you know 10% of gifts arrive in the last 48 hours of the year? It’s best to plan at least five email touches in December (one can be in your e-news), with a year-end blitz of at least three e-appeals between December 26th and 31st.TIPS: Take advantage of best practices:The best times to email prospects are between 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. (Source: GetResponse).Subject lines should not be an afterthought. 33% of email recipients open emails based on the subject line alone (Source: Convince and Convert).Personalized emails improve click-through rates by 14% and conversion rates by 10% (Source: Aberdeen Group).Send fundraising emails more than once. You never know when you’ll reach someone at an optimum time. 23.63% of email opens occur within the first hour of delivery (Source: GetResponse) and only 23% of sales emails are opened (Source: TOPO). Give your message a few chances.TIP: When folks click on the “donate” link in your email, make sure you send them to a branded donation page that reflects the same message featured in your appeal. This can help you raise as much as seven times more than a non-branded page.6. Plan a multi-channel campaign. Maximize your chances prospective donors will notice and act on your appeal.People today are more (or less) responsive depending on the way you connect with them. While your email appeal was like water off a duck’s back for Prospect A, they may take to a tweet with a link back to a compelling story on your website just like a duck takes to water! For Prospect B, on the other hand, direct mail may be the golden duck.  Even they, however, might wait to act until they’re reminded via email.This is why, when it comes to messaging, the “flock” (e.g., direct mail, email, website, social media, and telephone) will do better than any single duck trying to make it on its own. Don’t be afraid to include campaign messaging on several different channels. While you may not be tweeting out direct asks, it doesn’t hurt to include similar campaign theme, messaging, images and graphics so your year-end appeals stays top of mind for prospective donors.TIP: Send a sequence of messages across different channels. If your donor receives a mailed appeal, then sees a similar message via email or on a blog post or social media link a week later, this may trigger their memory and remind them to make a gift.TIP: Create a multi-channel campaign content calendar, work plan, and timeline that incorporates all of your offline and online appeal messaging. Plan to use a consistent theme across all channels so your integrated messages reinforce each other.7. Plan Ahead to Call Your Most Important Lapsed DonorsWho you call, and how many you call, will depend upon your own resources and the makeup of your donor base. Again, begin with those who’ve given the most, as well as those you believe have the greatest potential to become more major donors. Also take a look at those who’ve given consistently over a period of years. These are your most likely future planned giving donors – the ones who might leave you a bequest. The same holds true with ongoing, loyal volunteers. You don’t want to lose these folks, so find out why they may not have yet renewed.TIP: If you’re strapped for resources and staff to make calls, organize this as a year-end phonathon and enlist your board and other volunteers to help. It may even inspire some of them to give! No band width this year? Put it on your calendar for next year as a ‘must do.’ Why? It’s much more cost-effective to renew an existing donor, or convert a volunteer into a donor, than to acquire a brand new supporter.TIP: If it’s been awhile since your monthly donors got a real thank you, consider folding a ‘thankathon’ into your plan. Recruit board members, development committee members and/or other volunteers to help. If you’re a school, ask students to help. This sets you up to ask for an increased monthly commitment this year.8. Plan to Send a “We Miss You” Letter to Lapsed Donors You Can’t CallSome folks may manage to duck the question up until the last minute. Don’t give up! Send them a letter letting them know you miss them. Also send this letter to donors you called, but were unable to reach. Make it brief, direct and as personal as you can manage (e.g., if you called and left a message, reference the fact you’re sorry you missed them). And stay upbeat and positive. Reward your donor for their past giving and praise them for their ongoing generosity and good intentions.TIP: Tell them you know they intend to give because you know how much they care. One of Robert Cialdini’s 6 Principles of Influence is “commitment and consistency.” People are inclined to keep doing what they’ve already done in an effort to appear consistent. Assume in your tone and language that your donor simply has forgotten/just not got around to it due to the busyness of daily life (based upon my own experience, this is often true; many folks think they already gave and just need a reminder). I used to send a short note (in an envelope emblazoned with a finger tied with a little red reminder ribbon) that said “Did you forget?”SummaryThe end of the calendar year only comes around once annually.If you miss it, your would-be donors will have already flown the coop, having spent their wad. Elsewhere.Plan ahead to get your full piece of the fundraising pie this year.Prime the pump with an impact report.Get your mailing list ready. It’s fruitless to mail to dead ducks.Set goals based on past performance. It makes sense to hunt where the ducks are.Prioritize strategies based on potential for highest yield. This should be a no-brainer – as easy as duck soup – yet too often nonprofits focus more on the 80% of donors who give 20% of the money because mailing seems easier than phoning or meeting face-to-face.Plan as carefully for email as for direct mail. Don’t make your email a bit of a strange duck.Build a multi-channel strategy so no one strategy is all duck and no dinner.Don’t neglect lapsed and other loyal supporters. Compared with cold prospects, these folks are more likely to take to you like a duck to water.Now that you’ve got your duckies in a row, may you have smooth sailing this year-end.Data not otherwise attributed courtesy of Neon CRM.last_img read more

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Donor Experience Virtual Conference for Nonprofits – Don’t be Left Out!

first_imgVirtual Conference – Live StreamingCreating a Nonprofit Donor Experience to Increase Giving and Drive RetentionTuesday, March 27, 2018 | 12:00PM – 4:00PM ET The highly anticipated upcoming Virtual Conference hosted by Network for Good will bring together industry leaders for a robust discussion on the importance of amplifying the donor experience.Register Now to grab one of the few spots left!Great donor experience and engagement generates more giving, keeps donors close, and boots your personal satisfaction level and achievement. It is a win-win! Here are some additional thoughts about donor behaviors: Donors support causes to accomplish their personal missions, not yours!Those who get a great experience when supporting one organization (vs. another, because that’s the choice your donors make—there’s only so much attention and dollars to go around), engage significantly more than someone who doesn’t.That means more donations, but also more volunteering, campaigning, and program participation or advocacy. As your donors get more engaged—and become part of your organization’s family, in a way—the more likely they are to stay close, for the long term. More donations, greater retention. All good!But there’s even more to gain! Engaged donors When your donors are more engaged, they’re far more likely to share their passion with family and friends, expanding your organization’s reach and prospect base with NO ADDITIONAL staff or budget. You couldn’t do the same even if you had the staff and budget, because it’s your donors who have these trusted relationships in place.If your organization has between 100-2500 donors and prospects with contact information and has raised at least $15,000 in the last year from individual donors, ½-day, no-charge,  Virtual Conference will be a real game changer. REGISTER NOW for our Virtual Conference where we will explore this topic in great detail. There’s no better investment in the future of your organization—and in yourself.You’ll learn:The theory and research behind the donor engagement phenomenon (great for building buy in and excitement)How your donors and prospects brains really work, so you work with them, rather than againstFrom the most-experienced experts out there, including a colleague fundraiser who will share his organization’s eye-opening donor engagement story.And you’ll have the opportunity to schedule a one-to-one readiness assessment session with one of our engagement coaches!Don’t miss out: Register today!last_img read more

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Ryokan Sawanoya Enjoy The Nostalgic Atmosphere Of Tokyos Yanaka Area

first_imgThis is Hinoki no Yu. This bath can hold up to two people at the same time. Hinoki is the Japanese cypress tree. Wood from the Hinoki tree is considered to be a product of the highest quality. When you enter the bath area, you’ll soon notice the lovely fragrance of the Hinoki wood.From the bathtub you get a view of the beautiful Japanese-style garden. This is the first floor lounge where guests can relax and have breakfast, or enjoy one of the ryokan’s complimentary drinks.Right next door is the tourist information corner symbolized by a giant wall map of Japan. From Hokkaido all the way down to Okinawa, there are sightseeing pamphlets for all parts of Japan. While checking the map of Japan, many visitors like to plan the next stage of their trip.Cozy Japanese-Style RoomsRyokan Sawanoya has a total of twelve guest rooms, all Japanese-style. Each guest room comes equipped with an air conditioning/heating unit, a phone, internet access, a hair dryer, a yukata (light kimono-style clothing), towels, and a toothbrush.Next, let’s take a closer look at the different kinds of rooms available.Single Room (for One Guest)This is a single room for one person. It has traditional tatami flooring (above photo) and the room size is measured in terms of the number of tatami mats. In this case, the room has four and a half mats, a typical size for a Japanese-style single room.Though there is a sink in the room, there isn’t a washroom or toilet. On each floor there are separate men’s and women’s toilet facilities, shared by all guests.Each room has a closet and a storage area for a medium-sized suitcase. So you can use the room in a relaxed manner without having to worry about your personal belongings.Twin Room (for Two Guests)This twin room can accommodate two people and it’s six tatami mats in size. Guests have the option of choosing rooms with or without a bath and toilet.Triple Room (for Three Guests) Next is Toki no Yu. Its characteristic feature is a bathtub made from toki, or clay. From this tub you can also take in the beauty of the garden.Inside the bathing area there’s a set of English instructions with illustrations showing the dos and don’ts of bathtub use. So even guests using this kind of bath for the first time, can do so without any worries.Both bathing areas can be locked, so guests can relax and enjoy themselves in private.See also: Bath Culture In Japan: What Every Visitor Should Know Ahead Of TimeSawanoya’s FacilitiesCoin LaundryThe coin laundry room has a washer and dryer with complimentary laundry detergent.Souvenir ShopThis shop is filled with many popular souvenirs and gifts, including yukata (light kimono-style clothing) and postcards featuring Japanese scenery.They also sell hanko, or personal seals, with western names on them. You might even find a hanko with your name on it! If you buy it and take it home with you, this will definitely be something you can proudly show off to your family and friends.RefrigeratorThis fridge is handy for storing the snacks and drinks you bought at the convenience store or supermarket. We recommend clearly writing your name and room number on each item before storing it in the fridge.The Staff Will Welcome You Like Members of the FamilySince Sawanoya is a family run business, anytime you drop in you’ll be warmly greeted by the same staff members. It’s such a pleasant and comfortable atmosphere that when you return back after a busy day of sightseeing, you might even find yourself saying, “I’m home!”In quaint and nostalgic Yanaka, you can escape the hustle and bustle of the big city. For those of you who’d like to spend some quiet, leisurely time here, we highly recommend Ryokan Sawanoya.InformationRyokan SawanoyaAddress: Tokyo, Taito, Yanaka 2-3-11Check-In: 15:00Check-Out: 10:00Wi-Fi: AvailableCredit Card: VISA, MASTERCARD, AMEXLanguages: Japanese, EnglishInformation in Other Languages: YesNearest Station: Nezu Station (Chiyoda Line)Access: 7 minutes on foot from Nezu Station (Chiyoda Line)Cost: Usually 5000-6000 yen, but depends on the room typeTelephone: 03-3822-2251Official Homepage: Ryokan SawanoyaYou May Also Like:Yanaka Matsunoya – Perfect Handmade Tools For Daily LifeEnjoy Treats As You Walk And A Stunning Red Sunset: Yanaka Ginza Shopping StreetEdo-Style Rice Cakes And Sake At Habutae Dango In NipporiThe Ghostly Art Of Zenshoan Temple In Yanaka: August Limited EventShops bring fresh air to new but nostalgic Yanaka Sendagi Tokyo’s Yanaka is an area with a quaint, downtown kind of atmosphere. Here, the streets and homes still retain their historic flavor and there are traditional craft shops specializing in bamboo craftmanship and silverworking.If you venture down one of the narrow side streets you’ll see traditional homes with clay roof tiles (kawara), reminiscent of the good old days of Japan’s Showa period.In this area called Yanaka, there’s a guest house that’s highly popular among international visitors. It’s called Ryokan Sawanoya and it opened for business in 1949.First Floor Lounge – Sightseeing Information on Japan This is a triple room for three people. Same as the twin room, guests can choose a room with or without a bath and toilet. The room in the photo above has a bath and toilet.There’s also a bright and spacious reading corner. Imagine relaxing with your favorite book, as the sunlight comes streaming in through the stained glass window!Each room also has complimentary Japanese green tea service. As you can see in the above photo, there are English instructions available, so even visitors to Japan can easily make their own tea. This is another one of Sawanoya’s thoughtful gestures that make it so comfortable to stay here.A Traditional Tokyo View from Sawanoya’s Third FloorFrom a window on Sawanoya’s third floor, you can see the area’s traditional homes with their clay roof tiles. This kind of view is highly popular with our visitors to Japan. Even today you can see this nostalgic scenery, because Yanaka is an area that has preserved its historic streetscape and atmosphere.A Public Bath of Uncompromising QualityInside Sawanoya, there are two distinctly different public bathing areas. One is called, Hinoki no Yu, and the other is called, Toki no Yu.last_img read more

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