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SAL loads super-heavy module

first_imgThe super-heavy unit measured 42 m x 37 m x 36 m and has an overall volume of 54,353 cu m. SAL Heavy Lift accepted the project at short notice, only having two weeks to make all the necessary arrangements. Svenja’s on board equipment had to be modified to complete the job. The traverse had to be rigged and fastened at a certain angle; various grommets needed to be ordered and certified. Svenja used its two on board 1,000-tonne lifting capacity cranes in tandem to lift the module from a barge into the hold. Svenja is now making for Geoje in South Korea, transporting the module with open hatches and an overhang of 20 m.  www.sal-heavylift.comlast_img read more

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Promising Young Woman: watch the first trailer now

first_imgThe first trailer has debuted for Promising Young Woman.Due to be released in 2020, the film stars Carey Mulligan alongside Laverne Cox, Bo Burnham, Alison Brie, Connie Britton, Jennifer Coolidge, Max Greenfield, Christopher Mintz-Plasse, Chris Lowell, Adam Brody, Sam Richardson, Molly Shannon and Clancy Brown. Watch the trailer below:Promising Young Woman is directed by Emerald Fennell and produced by Margot Robbie, Tom Ackerley, Josey Mcnamara, Emerald Fennell and Ashley Fox. Everyone said Cassie (Carey Mulligan) was a promising young woman… until a mysterious event abruptly derailed her future. But nothing in Cassie’s life is what it appears to be: she’s wickedly smart, tantalizingly cunning, and she’s living a secret double life by night. Now, an unexpected encounter is about to give Cassie a chance to right the wrongs of the past in this thrilling and wildly entertaining story.last_img read more

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Double awards for City and Ashton Gate

first_imgAshton Gate Stadium won Best Operations Team while Mark Ashton was named Championship CEO of the year at the Honourable Artillery Company in London.It was a double honour for City and Ashton Gate Stadium, which successfully delivered a Summer Series of four concerts in the summer 2019 to further enhance its reputation as the premier sports, entertainment and business venue in the South West.Ashton Gate was shortlisted for best Operations Team alongside Accrington Stanley Football Club; Arsenal’s Travel, Events, Supporter Liaison Team; English Football League and Everton Football ClubMark Kelly, Managing Director of Ashton Gate Stadium, which was also nominated for Best Non-Match Day Use of Venue, said: “These awards are for all who work at Ashton Gate Stadium. We have such a dedicated and passionate team who consistently go above and beyond to make the stadium a 365-day destination, synonymous with quality and excellence.“Congratulations to Mark Ashton for his award and all at the football club for their support in helping us make the stadium and multiple sports team model a beacon of best practice in the industry.”As well as collecting the Championship CEO award, Ashton was shortlisted for the overall CEO award alongside Peter Moore (Liverpool FC), Gary Sweet (Luton Town), Carolyn Radford (Mansfield Town) and Alan Burrows (Motherwell). It was won on the night by Peter Moore.Mark Ashton said: “To be named Championship CEO of the year is a great honour and one that should be shared by everyone at this great football club who work tirelessly every day – everyone deserves credit. It’s also testament to Steve and Maggie Lansdown for their continued investment and backing to run this club in a fit, proper and successful way.“We are fortunate to call Ashton Gate Stadium our home and congratulations to Mark Kelly and his staff for their award. Their superb Operations Team ensures that our matchdays run smooth and I am fortunate to see every day what a great job they do on the wide range of events hosted at the stadium.”last_img read more

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Repeat robbery offender remanded

first_imgRepeat offender Dwayne Hardy was remanded to prison when he appeared at the Georgetown Magistratesdwayne hardy’ Courts to answer to a robbery charge.The 29-year-old man appeared before city Magistrate Fabayo Azore to answer to two counts of robbery.Hardy denied both charges which stated on June 5, at Mandela Avenue, being in the company of others and armed with a knife, he robbed Devon Singh of one gold chain valued $180,000, property of Ryan Diaz. On the same day, at the same location, he also allegedly robbed Singh of a gold chain valued $400,000 and one gold earring worth $100,000.Hardy, who was not represented by an Attorney, had visible injuries to his left eye which was swollen. Magistrate Azore enquired about his injuries and he told the Court he was involved in a fight with another inmate.Police Prosecutor Deniro Jones told the Court that the case file was still incomplete, and made no objections to bail, but requested a substantial amount.Magistrate Azore refused bail citing the fact that Hardy was charged and incarcerated previously for matters of a similar nature. The case will continue on June 27.last_img read more

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Barton Friedland used to work selling Apple comput

first_imgBarton Friedland used to work selling Apple computers in the early 1980s, at the very beginning of the desktop revolution, but he struggled to make sales to lawyers. The writer Ian Leslie tells the story:One day, he was with a lawyer in his office, when he had an epiphany. “I was telling him about all the wonderful things he could do if he had his own computer. Finally, he said, ‘Why would I want one of those on my desk? That’s what they have.’ And he pointed toward the secretary pool.Thirty-five years later, the battle to sell computers to professionals is over. There’s a computer on almost every desk. No office-based professional, whether a doctor or an accountant, a banker or a lawyer, would expect to do their job without almost constant access to a computer for communication, time-saving calculations, audit trails and much more.Yet, the 1980s lawyer was not completely wrong. Computers (and typewriters before them) were what the typists and secretaries of the era had. Proper letter-writing was a laborious task. Before computers, a typist often couldn’t correct a mistake and had to start again, so accuracy and speed were essential. Letters had to be properly addressed and then sent to a huge mailroom to be weighed, stamped and dispatched.Typing pools are largely a thing of the past, because executives are expected to write most of their own letters. Mailrooms have withered as executives are expected to correctly choose their clients’ email addresses. The role of the executive has changed since the 1980s: more independence, but less support. More control, but more potential for error (Oops, the busy doctor just emailed medical records to the wrong patient!).Software companies have, in their own way, undergone a structurally similar change.Once upon a time, not very long ago, software companies developed, deployed and operated large, monolithic systems. Coders wrote code, testers tested the code, QA people prodded it with a stick, deployment people put it into production and IT operations teams made sure it was all running properly. Security teams kept the network secure. When a server broke, IT was in charge of fixing or replacing it. When a hole was disclosed in an open-source library, it was security’s job to close it. Coders could focus on code.Was that past story ever really true? I’m not convinced it was exactly like that, but you get the idea. Developers were part of a big structure that took their code and turned it into something real.But now the world has changed. The move to cloud did away with companies’ on-premises infrastructure, making the server room go the way of the mailroom. DevOps broke down the barriers between developers, ITOps, testing and QA. Configuration-as-code moved some traditional operations functions into the hands of developers; infrastructure-as-code and containerization means that developers can create their own servers, and automated continuous integration and Deployment (CI/CD) pipelines are replacing dedicated deployment and testing teams, taking the developers’ code and magicking it into production. In its ultimate form, these trends become the movement known as GitOps, where everything is code and all changes are made by developers in Git repositories.All of these trends are putting more and more power in the hands of the developer. The developer has become king (or queen), and has more power than ever before.But with great power comes, yes, great responsibility. Developers aren’t only able to define their own Kubernetes clusters; in many situations, they’re responsible for them, without the safety net of Ops.Security teams can install all the firewalls they want, but if the developer leaves API keys or other secrets in GitHub repositories, then nothing is safe. A company can install state-of-the-art third-party security agents in their apps, but if a careless coder accidentally wipes only a few lines of code from the Ansible playbook, those expensive tools will never start in the first place.How should software companies respond? First is to recognize the reality. The developer is king and that’s unlikely to change.Second is to ensure that ops, security and other important functions aren’t lost in the new dev-led world.DevSecOps is more than a buzzword; it can point the way to a methodology that acknowledges that security and operations are, at least partly, in the hands of developers now. DevSecOps is about collaboration, not control. Security and ops teams shouldn’t become roadblocks to these developer-led processes. Instead, they need to consider how to ensure that they’re baked into the development process, not bolted on later. They need to become friends, trainers and mentors to developers rather than traffic policemen or border guards. They need to promote security champions inside development teams and integrate best practice at the start of the software development life cycle, not something thrown in at the end or as a roadblock in the middle.Pulling this all together is automation and enforcement. Automate everything: inline security scans, deploying from Git, securing your code repositories. Make everything seamless from the developer side.Then, as deployment and testing become automated, it becomes more important to spot mistakes and issues before they enter the pipeline. Policy enforcement solutions are the enablers of DevSecOps, and allow developers to code confidently without the constant worry that they’ll accidentally delete their production database, uninstall security agents or push secrets into repos. But to really make policy tools work, companies also need to be smart about how they define and implement their policies, and that’s where operations and security are key again.Developers didn’t ask for the keys to the kingdom — they were forced into their reluctant hands by automation, cloud, and everything as code. Now it’s up to the rest of a software organization to act as checks and balances on their new monarchs, using policies, training and enforcement solutions to keep them in line and keep their production systems safe, stable and secure.last_img read more

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