Tag: 爱上海419

Five things you need to see from this week’s Europa League action

first_imgMissed the week’s Europa League group stage action? Here are five things you need to see from Thursday night’s games.Zlatan Ibrahimovic scored a winner for Manchester United, while Irish part-timers Dundalk upset the odds once again, beating Maccabi Tel-Aviv.Francesco Totti showed that he’s still got it, while Mauro Zarate scored a stunning double for Fiorentina.And Sparta Prague piled the misery on Inter Milan. Watch the action below.last_img

Text to Save Lives: Mobile Giving Takes Off

first_imgTags:#mobile#Trends#web Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Last month, both China and Myanmar suffered natural disasters of such huge proportions that they received the attention of the world. The combination of the quake and the cyclone left a death toll that is today approaching 200,000, but has affected millions more. Many of us have read the news but have been so caught up in our day-to-day lives that we haven’t been able to find time to give. However, new mobile “text-to-give” services will help make charitable donations faster and easier to do. Last month, we informed you how you could use social media for social change. Today, we’ll tell you how to use something a little closer at hand: your cellphone.Help China & Mynmar Starting today, customers of Verizon Wireless in the U.S. can donate to a charity called “Save the Children,” who has mobilized in this time of crisis to provide lifesaving assistance in these two affected regions. Verizon customers can text to the address 4SAVE (47283) with the keyword “quake” to contribute to earthquake relief or the key word “cyclone” to contribute to cyclone relief. They will then receive a reply asking them to confirm their donation of $5.00, which will appear on their next monthly bill. In China, they’re doing the same thing – China Mobile customers can text the number ‘10699988’, and write the amount they would like to donate (from 1RMB to 30RMB) in the body of the text. The money will is deducted from either their phone bill or prepaid card.Text to Give PayPal has had a section of their web site devoted to charities that you can donate via text. Currently, the charities you can donate to this way include Amnesty International, UNICEF, and Starbright. Anytime you see an ad that says “Text To Give,” it’s simply a matter of texting the code to the number provided. PayPal calls you back to confirm your donation and then you’ll receive your receipt by email. To use PayPal mobile, you must first activate your phone. Then, select one of these current codes: Text AMNESTY to 78787 to donate $10.00 to Amnesty International Text WATER to 78787 to donate $10.00 to UNICEF’s program to help supply those in need with clean drinking water. For the Starlight Starbright foundation, you can donate one of three different amounts to help seriously ill children: Donate $5: Text 5 to 78787Donate $15: Text 15 to 78787 Donate $30: Text 30 to 78787 Of course, once your phone is registered, you can send money to anyone via PayPal’s SMS commands. Mobile Giving/Social GivingThere’s also a new site that’s involved in allowing people to donate to charities via text. The site is called mGive, and here, non-profits can register themselves and the keyword they want in order to receive a short code for mobile donations. The texters pay the donation amount on their mobile bill and mGive collects that from the cell companies and distributes it back to the non-profit. One of mGive’s current campaigns involves Alicia Keys’ efforts with the Keep a Child Alive Foundation, which is a response to the AIDS pandemic in Africa. U.S. users can text “ALIVE” to “90999” to donate $5 towards this cause. This service works on AT&T, Nextel, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon.mGivemGive works with a group called the Mobile Giving Foundation, a newly launched effort with a large amount of support from Qualcomm. The Mobile Giving Foundation was set up to help move the money from the cell phone carriers to the charities. This organization is currently working with over 20 large charities, like Keep a Child Alive (mentioned above), and more. Since the foundation has just launched, there are only a limited number of campaigns running, but its current roster that includes ASPCA (text Give to 27722), Alicia Keys Keep a Child Alive Campaign (text ALIVE to 90999), and FIT to UNITED (864833). In the future, there will be campaigns with PBS, IFAW, and others. More SoonMobile Giving is certainly a growing trend meant to capitalize on the ubiquity of cell phones and their heavy use by members of the younger generation. We’ll definitely start seeing more of these “text to give” campaigns in the future, but it seems that, today, only Verizon seems to offer a campaign for China and Myanmar aid, which is disappointing.A rise in mobile giving will also give rise to mobile charity scammers – in fact, it already has, both in China and in the U.S., so be on guard against unsolicated SMS text messages asking for donations. Do you know of any good text-to-give campaigns? Let us know in the comments. Related Posts What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …center_img sarah perez Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

Wall Street Journal Unveils Online China Econtracker

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#international#web China Econtracker offers outlays of data based on gross domestic product, industrial value added, fixed asset investment, exports, imports, trade balance, foreign exchange reserves, consumer price index and bank credit. It provides a source for each set of data and allows users to post the results to their Twitter account or Facebook page. Whether your are among those likely to wind up “fighting it out with journalists at the State Council Information Office or getting lost for hours in the maze of Beijing’s Internet” as Tom Orlik writes on China Real Time’s post on the Econtracker, or just someone who wishes to be more informed about one of the most important economies on earth, the site looks to provide a real utility. One commenter on the post, however, said:“Chinese export statistics originate in individual customs declarations. These declarations include an ever expanding and now very likely statistically material amount of trade ’roundtripped’ through Bonded Logistics Parks in China in order to realize export VAT refunds. One of the many reasons that this statistic, like any other in China, is simply not reliable.”Now, if you understand that enough to agree or disagree, you may not need this tool. For the rest of us, though, I still think it will prove useful, however reductive and unreliable statistical collections may be.Government office photo by Daniel Gao | other sources: China Digital Times curt hopkins Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting China Real Time, the Wall Street Journal’s blog devoted to the world’s second-largest country, has developed and launched China Econtracker, a valuable tool to access and understand economic data on the country. Dealing with the statistical bureaus of the world’s second-largest economy is even less pleasant than it sounds. So the Journal has created this well-organized, graphically effective and easy-to-use site. It organizes data by month-to-month and year-over-year presentations and users can switch from one to the other. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

Your quick guide to better nonprofit financial management

first_imgIf you feel the need to strengthen your financial management savvy, check out StrongNonprofits.org, a new website featuring free tools, how-tos and guides.Developed in partnership between The Wallace Foundation and Fiscal Management Associates, the site contains more than 64 resources for anyone involved in nonprofit financial planning, monitoring, operations or oversight, and particularly nonprofit afterschool program providers. Features range from a nonprofit accounting guide, to an article on sensible growth strategies, to a podcast on how to understand the true costs of programming. The site also offers an array of helpful tools, including the “Go or No Go Decision Tool,” a questionnaire that helps an organization decide whether accepting a contract would help – or hurt – the group’s bottom line.The site includes:• A Five-Step Guide to Budget Development—a presentation that describes a team approach to budgeting essentials such as setting financial goals, forecasting results and monitoring progress.• Budgeting and Financial Planning Tools—Excel-based templates to provide organizations with a framework for building program-based budgets, projecting cash flow, and evaluating revenue scenarios.• Guide to Effective Board Leadership—an easy-to-follow description of how nonprofit boards can do the necessary financial oversight of their organizations.You can find the site here.last_img read more

How to inspire with stories: Season of Giving Campaign

first_imgA story’s emotional power is a fundraiser’s best tool to gain the attention of donors and inspire action. One fundraising campaign that is hitting it out of the park with its emotional “wow” factor is Ronald McDonald House Charities’ Season of Giving. The campaign’s message reinforces the work that RMHC does by reminding supporters that there is strength in numbers and that they are really giving the gift of togetherness when they make a contribution. I had a chance to chat with Jennifer Smith, Senior Director of Communications & Special Programs at Ronald McDonald House Charities to learn more about this campaign and its approach to connecting donors with the work they make possible. Jennifer was kind enough to share a bit of the process behind this amazing campaign and offer some tips to other nonprofits this holiday season.“For any nonprofit, but certainly for Ronald McDonald House Charities, our goal is to share the impact of the work we do with the support of our donors. Every campaign we do lets our donors know that the work they make possible is making a difference in the lives of the families we serve. For potential donors, this illustrates the fact that they are needed,” Jennifer says.The Seasons of Giving campaign includes donor communication pieces, direct mail appeals, videos, online ads, and social media outreach. In this multi-channel campaign, there are unifying elements, such as a red ribbon motif that provides visual connectivity across platforms.Jennifer has a great reminder for all nonprofit fundraisers: Don’t forget to match the message with the medium. “We’re careful to tailor the message. You can’t just stick your direct mail language on Facebook. Different elements pull out different aspects. Use the different components of the story to target specific audience at the right time. We make sure the content is relevant but there are still the connected elements, such as branding and the overall messaging.”How did RMHC arrive at this campaign?Jennifer shares a fundamental, yet natural, shift, “There was a time when we spoke more to facts, figures and children served, but we found that to add more dimension to the message, we had to do that by telling the family stories. People are already willingly telling their stories—they want to be able to share what they’ve been through. They often want to give back and say, ‘We want to help YOU.’ You can’t manufacture authenticity. You need real people telling real stories.”Here are Jennifer’s tips for other nonprofits looking to capture and share stories:1. Listen to what people are already telling you. What are your supporters and beneficiaries saying? Take those words and insights and build a story from them. This helps your supporters understand how our work is making a difference, and that donors are the ones making it happen.2. Sharing stories encourages others to tell their stories. After seeing the Season of Giving campaign, it’s clear that it’s not just about the official videos or stories—it’s about allowing more people to open up and share their stories. “Social media is a wonderful listening tool; the dialogue that happens is inspiring. I haven’t been in their shoes, so when they’re sharing their stories organically, it is a powerful experience,” Jennifer says, giving us a great reminder of the beauty of social media. “If you’re listening you can be more insightful and tuned in to messages that resonate. It also allows those stores to be shared more easily and more widely.”3. Ask, but be sensitive. Don’t be afraid to ask, “Would you be willing to share your story?” Jennifer’s team is careful to recognize the challenges, “We’re very sensitive to the fact that some of these families are going through what they are going through. What is powerful about [the stories featured in our videos] is that Kayla and Christina are still fighting and working to heal from cancer.” Jennifer also reminds us that it’s important to have checkpoints throughout the process. Continually ask, “Are you still comfortable with telling this story?”4. Make it a part of your organization’s culture. Jennifer shares how this works at RMHC, “The way our system is structured, we rarely have to do a formal process. If we see something that catches our eye, we first reach out to our Chapter and ask permission to find out more. Then if timing is right, we talk to the family.” Jennifer adds, “We also use stories from corporate donors, such as McDonald’s owner/operators, volunteers, and staff, etc. One of our core tenets is our compassion, from our training of our staff people to volunteers. We exist to provide resources when people really need it, and this permeates throughout everything we do.” A big thank you to Jennifer for sharing her insight with our readers and to the people at RMHC for the great work they do. To find out more about the RMHC Season of Giving campaign, visit http://www.rmhc.org/season-of-giving.last_img read more

6 Things You Need for a Successful Year-End Email

first_imgCreating your year-end email appeals? Don’t forget these six key ingredients:An obvious donation button.Your donate button should be big, bold, and above the fold. When your donors want to give, it needs to be as easy as possible. They shouldn’t need to hunt for the link to your donation page.A clear and specific call to action.A vague call to action like “support us” is more likely to confuse than to motivate. To be effective, make your calls to action highly specific and feasible.A sense of urgency.Compel your donors to take action with a real sense of urgency. Let your supporters know when there are only a few more days left to meet your annual goal.Contact information.Make sure to link to a contact page so donors can get in touch if they have an important question. It’s also important to include an easy way for readers to opt-out of your nonprofit’s emails (if you’re not sending from an email service provider like Constant Contact, be aware of CAN-SPAM laws).Mobile-friendly design.Smartphones make it easy to act in the moment, which is important because the decision to donate is often impulsive. Make sure your emails are mobile-friendly so you can easily connect with donors at any time, no matter where they are.A compelling case for giving.Asking for a donation is not enough. To stand out from the crowd, nonprofit fundraisers must make a compelling case for giving by using stories, building credibility, and packaging your message.last_img read more

New Estimates Show Major Reduction in Maternal Mortality, But More Progress Needed

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 16, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)New global maternal mortality estimates were released today in a report by the World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and the World Bank. The report,“Trends in maternal mortality: 1990 to 2010”, shows that the number of women dying of pregnancy and childbirth related complications has almost halved in 20 years.  The estimates show that from 1990 to 2010, the annual number of maternal deaths has dropped from more than 543,000 to 287,000–and that a number of countries have already reached the MDG target of 75 per cent reduction in maternal death.Major highlights from the report:• In 2010, the global maternal mortality ratio was 210 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. Sub-Saharan Africa had the highest maternal mortality ratio at 500 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births.• In sub-Saharan Africa, a woman faces a 1 in 39 lifetime risk of dying due to pregnancy or childbirth-related complications. In South-eastern Asia the risk is 1 in 290 and in developed countries, it is 1 in 3,800.• Ten countries have 60 per cent of the global maternal deaths: India (56,000), Nigeria (40,000), Democratic Republic of the Congo (15,000), Pakistan (12,000), Sudan (10,000), Indonesia (9,600), Ethiopia (9,000), United Republic of Tanzania (8,500), Bangladesh (7,200) and Afghanistan (6,400).• Ten countries have already reached the MDG target of a 75 per cent reduction in maternal death: Belarus, Bhutan, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Iran, Lithuania, Maldives, Nepal, Romania and Viet Nam.Read the full press release here.Read the full report here.Join the conversation on Twitter at hashtag: #motherhood #MMR2012Over the past few years, the global health community has witnessed and contributed to the publication of more frequent and more technically advanced estimates for maternal mortality than ever before. This report adds to the growing body of evidence that is helping the maternal health community to measure and better understand the scope and trends of the problem. It is an exciting time in the field–and we encourage you to read the new report.Share this:last_img read more

What Women’s Health Initiatives in India Can Teach Us All

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on June 15, 2012June 16, 2017By: Gary Darmstadt and Wendy Prosser, Bill & Melinda Gates FoundationClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post was originally posted on Impatient Optimists.With almost 200 million people living in the state of Uttar Pradesh, India, a state more populous than the entire country of Brazil, the sheer breadth of exciting, new ways to improve maternal and child health is enormous. With all of those people and increased investments in health research and service delivery along with a growing economy, imagine how much information and knowledge can be shared when it comes to finding solutions for some of the most challenging women’s and children’s health issues. But also imagine how complicated it must be to find the right people with the right information to learn from to scale up these programs.I had the chance to talk to our partners at the Urban Health Initiative (UHI) in Uttar Pradesh last week. The Urban Health Initiative works to improve the health of the urban poor—particularly in enabling women to plan their families and access the contraceptives that they want—in this densely populated area. I asked their opinions about what we’re doing that works, what doesn’t work, what we should change—and what we are not doing that they would like us to do.They encouraged us to do more in the area of knowledge sharing, because they see the tremendous benefits of learning from other organizations, partners, the private sector, and global thought leaders. They see the synergies that can exist even between sectors, like family planning and HIV, and want to exploit those in the most beneficial ways.For example, foundation partners who work in the contraceptives arena know that, in Uttar Pradesh, 21 percent of women want to use some form of birth control but they don’t. Knowledge is understanding why those women don’t use birth control—for example, because the health center closest to her house has been out of stock of her preferred method for a couple of months, or because she is too embarrassed to get condoms from her neighborhood store—and then to act on that information to create lasting solutions.This conversation I had in Uttar Pradesh reminded me of the thoughts that were shared at the Achieving Lasting Impact at Scale convening at the end of last year. That convening brought practitioners, researchers, and global experts together to start the conversation on diffusion and dissemination, and of scaling up successful interventions for impact in maternal and child health—not just documentation of inputs or things done, but real impact in improving the health of women and children.The ideas from our partners at UHI are the catalyst to change the way we think and talk about the ways in which we provide women’s and children’s health care in developing countries. They specifically suggested the breakdown of “silos,” or separation between organizations and sectors working in different health arenas, by creating platforms to share learning and knowledge.We’re talking about much more than sharing information, data, trip summaries, or progress reports from activity implementation.Our partners in Uttar Pradesh are asking for inventive ways to share knowledge to scale successful interventions which have a positive, lasting impact on women’s and children’s health. And we’re working to address this need, given the tremendous potential to increase our collective ability for impact when it comes to maternal, newborn, and child health in India—and to disseminate this learning from India for benefit throughout the world.Share this:last_img read more

Why Are Women Dying When They Reach the Hospital on Time?

first_imgPosted on July 10, 2013March 6, 2017By: Dr. Alice Self, Sandwell General Hospital, Lyndon, West Bromwich; Hannah Knight, Research Fellow, Health Informatics, Office for Research and Clinical Audit, Lindsay Stewart R&D Centre, Royal College of Obstetricians and GynaecologistsClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)It can be hard to imagine the challenges some women and their families face whilst trying to access timely and effective maternity care:“By the time they struggled to get her an admission card, by the time she was admitted, by the time her file was made up, by the time the midwife was called, by the time the midwife finished eating, by the time the midwife came, by the time the husband went and bought some gloves, by the time the midwife examined the woman, by the time the doctor could be found, by the time the husband went out to buy drugs, IV set, drip and bottle of ether, by the time the haematologist was called, by the time the haematologist came and took blood from the poor tired husband, by the time the day and night nurses changed duty, by the time the day and night doctors changed duty, by the time the t’s had been properly crossed and all the i’s dotted and the husband signed the consent form, the woman died.”Extract from a letter by F Tahzib, University of Sokoto, Nigeria (1989), cited in Thaddeus & Maine (1994)Although it was written almost 30 years ago, this powerful excerpt serves to illustrate some of the numerous and persistent barriers that still prevent many women from receiving effective and timely care, even once they reach a health facility.A group of researchers from the University of Oxford decided to examine the literature on this topic in order to better understand these facility-level (otherwise known as Phase III) delays.  Previous studies had tended to focus on the challenges women face in reaching a hospital on time, rather than what happened once they arrived.PLOS has now published this systematic review in its MHTF-PLOS Maternal Health Collection. The review identifies 32 different barriers that can prevent women from receiving timely and appropriate obstetric care once they arrive at a medical facility, and classifies these into 6 categories: human resources; drugs and equipment; facility infrastructure; policy and guidelines; patient-related and referral-related.The most commonly cited barriers in the literature were:inadequate training/skills mixdrug procurement/logistics problemsstaff shortageslack of equipmentlow staff motivationTwo important conclusions emerge from this work and are worth highlighting:Although patient-side delays in the decision to seek care and in reaching a medical facility are responsible for a great number of maternal deaths, focusing only on these delays can mask the fact that many health facilities in the developing world are still chronically under-resourced and unable to cope effectively with serious obstetric complications. Providers and policy-makers must work together to address supply-side barriers alongside demand-side factors if further reductions in maternal mortality are to be achieved.Simple, replicable tools to assess facility-level barriers are badly needed to assist health managers in identifying facilities that deliver sub-optimal care, and in both making and monitoring the required improvements. No generally accepted methodology exists and this makes comparisons between countries very difficult. The authors call for the introduction of benchmark indicators that assess the content and quality of maternal care, rather than the rates of skilled attendance at birth alone.Read the systematic review. Take a look at the MHTF-PLOS Maternal Health Collection.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

New MDG Report Highlights the Need to Invest in Girls, Women and Youth

first_imgShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:,The MDG report draws from official statistics to provide up-to-date summary data on each target at global and regional levels, with country-level data available online. There is much to celebrate: maternal and child mortality rates have dropped, and fewer people are dying from HIV, malaria and tuberculosis than ever before. After two years of steady decreases in development aid, official development assistance hit a record high of $134.8 billion in 2013. However, aid has been redirected away from the poorest countries where it is needed most. This trend will need to be reversed in order to see future progress.Despite declines in maternal deaths, almost 300,000 women continue to die each year during pregnancy and childbirth, and largely from preventable causes. Access to family planning has been identified as a life-saving, cost-effective intervention, yet more than 220 million women in the developing world still have an unmet need for modern contraceptives. Adolescent girls are particularly at risk, with 117 out of every 1000 adolescent girls in sub-Saharan Africa giving birth in 2011.Given this, it is critical that girls and women are prioritized and have a voice in planning the new sustainable development goals. Women Deliver Young Leader Esther Agbarake, Co-Founder of the Youth Climate Coalition, spoke today at the High-Level segment of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) of the United Nations and drove home the importance of engaging with youth.“For young people to also make successful transition to adulthood, they need access to affordable and quality adolescent-and-youth friendly health services and information,” she told the high-level participants. “It is, therefore, imperative that the issues of governance and participation, health including reproductive and sexual health and rights, peacebuilding and security as they relate to young people are reflected in the new development framework… Young people can and are providing the answers, ideas and innovations that can drive sustainable development and produce solutions to today’s greatest challenges. This requires the meaningful participation of young people in governance and decision-making processes across all levels.”Read the Press ReleaseRead the Report The MDG report draws from official statistics to provide up-to-date summary data on each target at global and regional levels, with country-level data available online. There is much to celebrate: maternal and child mortality rates have dropped, and fewer people are dying from HIV, malaria and tuberculosis than ever before. After two years of steady decreases in development aid, official development assistance hit a record high of $134.8 billion in 2013. However, aid has been redirected away from the poorest countries where it is needed most. This trend will need to be reversed in order to see future progress.Despite declines in maternal deaths, almost 300,000 women continue to die each year during pregnancy and childbirth, and largely from preventable causes. Access to family planning has been identified as a life-saving, cost-effective intervention, yet more than 220 million women in the developing world still have an unmet need for modern contraceptives. Adolescent girls are particularly at risk, with 117 out of every 1000 adolescent girls in sub-Saharan Africa giving birth in 2011.Given this, it is critical that girls and women are prioritized and have a voice in planning the new sustainable development goals. Women Deliver Young Leader Esther Agbarake, Co-Founder of the Youth Climate Coalition, spoke today at the High-Level segment of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) of the United Nations and drove home the importance of engaging with youth.“For young people to also make successful transition to adulthood, they need access to affordable and quality adolescent-and-youth friendly health services and information,” she told the high-level participants. “It is, therefore, imperative that the issues of governance and participation, health including reproductive and sexual health and rights, peacebuilding and security as they relate to young people are reflected in the new development framework… Young people can and are providing the answers, ideas and innovations that can drive sustainable development and produce solutions to today’s greatest challenges. This requires the meaningful participation of young people in governance and decision-making processes across all levels.”Read the Press ReleaseRead the Reportcenter_img Posted on July 9, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This article originally appeared on the Women Deliver blog on July 7th, 2014Since their implementation fourteen years ago, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have made critical strides, yet challenges remain for girls, women and young people, says a new report released today by the United Nations. The Millennium Development Goals Report 2014 shows that while some MDG targets have been met, including the reduction of extreme poverty by half, other critical targets such as MDG 5—the reduction of maternal mortality by 75%—remain far off course. The report indicates that large-scale progress is possible, but only with sufficient funding and data to address staggering inequalities.last_img read more

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