Veripos Appoints Business Development Manager for Scandinavia

first_imgDue to the continued growth of its Norwegian market, Veripos has appointed Thomas Skattum as Business Development Manager for the Scandinavia Region, responsible for all aspects of developing and securing new business for Veripos in all market sectors for customers based in this key region.Skattum joins Veripos from a role as a Sales Executive with Linak Norge. However, prior to this, Skattum had a long career with Fugro Seastar in Norway which he joined in 1998 and where he spent 14 years in various roles, latterly as Sales Executive for Fugro Seastar’s DP Services in Norway. Working in conjunction with the EAME Business Development team, Skattum will be based in Oslo and will report to Angus Scott, Vice President of EAME region.Commenting on the appointment Angus Scott said “Norway is a key growth area for Veripos, as it is the home base for many vessel owners, shipyards, DP system integrators and contractors in the seismic, construction, OSV and drilling sectors. The appointment of Thomas Skattum will help support our business development effort not only in Norway but also in the wider Scandinavian region where there are also good opportunities. Thomas brings a wealth of relevant experience and excellent industry knowledge and contacts and we are pleased to welcome him on-board.”Press Release, September 11, 2013last_img read more

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Allidi tames the Mountain

first_imgI saw the 2 mini vans off at 8.27 am from the GS and they arrived at the course 55 minutes later where things were very quiet.  After a brief preparation the first group, a three-ball, got away 15 minutes earlier than the scheduled 10.00 am start time and it was reported that the course was in quite good condition and recovering well from the recent work although some found the greens somewhat slower than they are used to.It was a fairly quick round of golf with fine weather and unlike Pattaya, no rain, with the first group back in the clubhouse four hours & five minutes after they started.  After the negative recent reports regarding Treasure Hill it was reported that it is now very acceptable with minimum inconveniences.We had 2 Grades – A Grade for handicaps 0 to 19 and B Grade for handicaps 20 and over with 4 places in each grade.  There were also rewards for nearest the pins on the four par threes and longest first putts on the 9th & 18th greens.First timer Andy Todd (20 point back nine) was the winner of the A Grade section, winning on a count back from Gerd Riedler (18 point back nine) with both of them scoring 36 points.  Another count back was required with 4 golfers on 34 points to decide third & fourth places and it saw Kissy Buchanan (19 point back nine) finish third from John Pierrel (16 point back nine & 11 points on the last 6 holes) in fourth spot.  The unlucky ones were Kevin “Wayco” Waycott (16 point back nine & 8 points on the last 6 holes) and Martin “Toddy” Todd (14 point back nine).Jerry “Dobbsy” Dobbs was victorious in the B Grade with a steady 36 points and John Davis came second with 34 points.  In third place came Patrick Poussier on 28 points and Dave Marshall was fourth with 26 points.A Flight (0-19)1st Andy Todd (12) 36pts2nd Gerd Riedler (6) 36pts3rd Kissy Buchanan (16) 34pts4th John Pierrel (10) 34ptsB Flight (20+)1st Jerry Dobbs (22) 36pts2nd John Davis (22) 34pts3rd Patrick Poussier (22) 28pts4th Dave Marshall (20) 26ptsNear Pins:  2nd – Kevin Waycott, 6th – Ebrahim, 13th – Patrick Poussier, 17th – John PierrelLong Putts:  9th – Martin Todd, 18th – Mike GosdenThe Growling Swan NAGA Award (awarded to the golfer who has the worst score on the day) was won by Volker Buley and he accepted the award in very good spirit.  Toddy then kindly paraded Deefa the Dog and of course collected many donations for the needy in Pattaya from our generous Growling Swan golfers.Thursday, Oct. 3, Mountain Shadow – StablefordWe were originally booked to play at Crystal Bay but their staff were good enough to inform me the day before that the course was extremely wet and carts would not be allowed anywhere on the golf course.  They offered us Mountain Shadow as an alternative as they have cart paths there so their offer was accepted.Jerry Dobbs, Volker Buley & Andy Todd.We gathered at The Growling Swan as the sun shone and our final number was 27 as your writer decided to delay his return for a further 4 days.  We welcomed first timers Adam, Gary & Ben from the UK and sadly said Bon Voyage to Jerry Dobbs, returning to work in Australia, Volker Buley who was off back to Germany after his brief stay and David Marshall who was returning to Queensland, Australia.I farewelled the 3 mini vans 5 minutes ahead of schedule at 8.25 am and it was reported that their journey was the usual 45 minutes and the golf course was reasonably quiet although the weather was fine.  Unfortunately I had omitted to inform Alain “Inspector Clouseau” Taddei, who was driving to the course that there had been a change of venue so he rang me from Crystal Bay in despair but I simply re-directed him up the road.  He was in Group 1 but that was OK as Toddy allowed a couple of groups to slip in front of our first which got away 5 minutes later than scheduled at 10.05 am.Apparently the golf course was in very good condition considering the amount of recent rain and the round of golf was completed in four hours & fifteen minutes, although about four holes were played in steady rain.We had 2 Grades – A Grade for handicaps 0 to 17 and B Grade for handicaps 18 & over with 5 places in each grade.  There were also rewards for nearest the pins on the four par threes and longest first putts on the 9th & 18th greens.The wet conditions did not appear to worry A Grade winner Mike Allidi who carded a 70 off the stick for his 41 points and another fine round from Kevin “Wayco” Waycott secured second place with 40 points.  Takeshi Hakozaki finished third with 36 points and Gerd Riedler was fourth with 35 points.  With 3 golfers having 34 points a count back was required to determine fifth spot which went to Ebrahim (19 point back nine) and Sal Brizzi (17 point back nine) & Alain “Inspector Clouseau” Taddei (17 point back nine) just missed out.Max “Corsets” Bracegirdle easily won the B Grade section with a fine 39 points which was 5 points better than second place-getter John Davis and Jerry “Dobbsy” Dobbs was third with 28 points.  In fourth place came Stephen Newton and Gary Monley was fifth with 26 points.A Flight (0-17)1st Mike Allidi (3) 41pts2nd Kevin Waycott (10) 40pts3rd Takeshi Hakozaki (11) 36pts4th Gerd Riedler (6) 35pts5th Ebrahim (17) 34ptsB Flight (18+)1st Max Bracegirdle (25) 39pts2nd John Davis (22) 34pts3rd Jerry Dobbs (22) 28pts4th Stephen Newton (26) 27pts5th Gary Monley (36) 26ptsNear Pins:  5th – Mike Allidi, 8th – Gerd Riedler, 15th – Martin Todd, 17th EbrahimLong Putts:  9thy – Brad Todd, 18th – Mike AllidiThe Growling Swan NAGA Award was won by Les Moloney, Muncha’s Dad and he accepted the award in good spirit.  Max then kindly paraded Deefa the Dog and collected donations for the needy from our generous Growling Swan golfers.Note:  Growling Swan Golf welcomes golfers of any persuasion – low & high handicappers alike, female golfers and beginners.  We generally play Mondays & Thursdays, meeting at The Growling Swan (formerly The Bunker Bar) in Soi Chaiyapoon at 8.00 am with transport departing at 8.30 am.  For bookings or more information please contact Peter on 0806 351 386 or email to petermalcolmblackburn @gmail.com.We also play bowls out of the Growling Swan every Wednesday and Sunday: Sunday is Lawn Bowls and Wednesday is Indoor Bowls.  All are welcome and for anyone that is interested the transport leaves The Growling Swan at 10.00am on each of those mornings.  For more information please contact Paul Rennison on 0843 454 005. PSC golf from The Growling SwanMonday, Sept. 30, Treasure Hill – StablefordAfter very heavy overnight rain we were presented with a fine Pattaya Monday morning as we made our way to The Growling Swan in readiness for the journey to the challenging Treasure Hill Golf Course.   The original field of 23 was reduced to 20 after three late withdrawals due to sickness which included your writer who is still battling with a sciatic nerve issue.  Nonetheless, we were happy to welcome back Dick Braimbridge from Queensland, Australia, Ken Hole from a few weeks in the UK and good friend Volker Buley from Germany.  There were also newcomers Andy Todd & Paul King from Perth in Western Australia, Peter Burke from Broken Hill, New South Wales, Australia and David Marshall from Brisbane.  Also, apologies to Graham “Grunter” Buckingham for not saying farewell to him prior to his visit back to the UK.Max Bracegirdle, Les Moloney & Mike Allidi.last_img read more

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Corporate sponsors of Olympians enter the #MeToo fray

first_imgSponsorship at the OlympicsSince corporate sponsors and other outside sources are contributing about 35 percent of the U.S. Olympic Committee’s US$34.47 million annual budget, their loss could prove financially devastating to U.S. Olympic teams and athletes.Ever since the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Olympics, corporate sponsors have pitched in mightily with the nation’s Olympic funding efforts.Official sponsorships for the International Olympic Committee now top $1 billion. That’s a tenfold increase since the lead-up to the 1988 Summer Olympics.Winter Games sponsorship funding generated by the host country has also soared, rising from $163 million in 1998 to $1.2 billion in 2014.Team USA, or the collective group of U.S. Olympians and teams, currently has 18 corporate sponsors – deals that usually generate $100 million over a four-year period. And the support does not stop there. Companies can support specific teams or individual athletes. Toyota, for example, is sponsoring the U.S. figure skating, speed skating and hockey teams. The positive association set between the sport product and sponsor is key. What happens, though, when the sport product elicits negative feelings and attitudes? At that time, the association linkages turn negative, to the detriment of the sponsor. As a result, the sponsor is likely to suspend or terminate the relationship.Companies tend to drop their endorsement packages when athletes generate negative press coverage. Examples include the uproar that followed Filipino boxer Manny Pacquiao‘s homophobic slurs and the fallout when Russian tennis star Maria Sharapova tried (and failed) to cover up her use of a banned performance-enhancing substance.Failure to sever those ties can hurt the business bottom line. University of California-Davis professor Victor Stango, for example, found that golfer Tiger Woods’ extramarital affairs have cost the shareholders of his endorsers, including Nike, Gatorade and others, as much as $12 billion.The 2018 Olympics and #MeTooWhere, then, does this leave sponsors of the 2018 Olympics, Team USA and U.S. Olympic athletes?On the one hand, some of the sponsorship packages have been in place for years, with sponsoring companies taking steps to leverage the relationships. Thus, the sunk costs are considerable.On the other hand, it is hard to imagine a time in recent years when the brand association of the U.S. Olympic team, as a whole, has been poorer. In the past year, both USA Swimming and USA Gymnastics have been rocked by sexual abuse accusations regarding coaches and other staff like Nassar. The calls for the U.S. Olympic Committee’s leaders to resign grow louder by the day.Over the past year, it has become clear that the nation no longer tolerates sexual abuse and harassment. Powerful men like movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, TV newsman Matt Lauer, and football coach Rich Rodriguez have had their prestige vanish and their careers collapse once their predations came to light.American companies get this and can’t afford to be associated with anyone tainted by this kind of scandal.Though similar cases of sexual abuse and sexual harassment have not yet surfaced among Winter Olympic teams or athletes, the Olympic rings themselves are already tarnished.It may be only be a matter of time before other organizations follow AT&T and Procter & Gamble’s lead, and suspend or terminate their relationships with the Olympics until its leadership works harder to crack down on sexual abuse in the world of sports.George B. Cunningham, Professor of Sport Management, Faculty Affiliate of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, and Director, Laboratory for Diversity in Sport, Texas A&M University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Not exactly philanthropicThough sponsors will frequently tout their support as helping Olympians achieve their goals, this largesse isn’t purely philanthropic. The fact is that corporations give athletes and teams money to enhance awareness of their brands and burnish their image with a lucrative marketing tool.They achieve these goals by linking their name with successful athletes. Sponsors are placing a bet that consumers will feel good about Olympic contenders and winners, then they bank on some of that glow transferring to their brand. Sponsors strategically use marketing techniques to improve the odds of this happening.center_img Dick’s Sporting Goods presenting Team USA – including Olympic gymnast Simone Biles – a check for $236,000. Kevin Wolf/AP ImagesDick’s Sporting Goods presenting Team USA – including Olympic gymnast Simone Biles – a check for $236,000.Kevin Wolf/AP ImagesRevelations brought to light during the trial of sports doctor Larry Nassar are reverberating.High-level resignations are piling up at Michigan State University, the physician’s former employer. USA Gymnastics, the team’s governing body, has severed its ties with the Karolyi Ranch, the compound where many of the team’s gold medalists say the physician sexually abused them, and its entire board is resigning. The U.S. Olympic Committee is under severe pressure from advocates.The gymnastics scandal’s shockwaves also have financial implications. One day before Nassar’s sentencing, AT&T suspended its USA Gymnastics sponsorship. A month earlier, Procter & Gamble severed ties with the organization as well.Sexual abuse is a chronic condition that afflicts many other sports besides gymnastics. With the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements gaining momentum and their influence growing, might they affect the 2018 Winter Olympic Games, an event that traditionally commands substantial sums from sponsors? As a sport management professor who focuses on diversity and inclusion, my analysis leads me to believe that’s quite likely.last_img read more

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Anthony Cunningham Steps Down as Galway Hurling Manager

first_imgAnthony Cunningham has stepped down as Galway hurling manager. In a secret ballot overseen by an independent observer last night 26 out of 32 voted ‘no’ when asked if they had confidence in the current management.In a Statement released this evening he said…..I, Anthony Cunningham incumbent Senior Hurling Manager since 2012, hereby confirm the following:- Despite the fact that I was unanimously ratified and supported by the Galway GAA Clubs, the County Hurling and Galway County Committees and having reviewed the current impasse in detail over the past month, it is with great sadness tonight that I and my Management Team announce our resignation from our positions.I do so with the best interests of Galway Hurling in mind and with the priority of best assisting Galway hurling to build on the achievement of 2015. As a Management team we have exhausted all avenues with support from the clubs, their delegates, the hurling fraternity and County Committees in the past month to bring this impasse to a conclusion and protect Galway Hurling.Despite extensive attempts at genuine dialogue including Independent Arbitration, there were no reasonable explanations offered or given as to the issues that players felt they had. I believe that the players are misguided in that they are not taking the views of their county on board. They, through their actions, have shown scant respect for, and loyalty to the goodwill shown them by supporters, clubs and County GAA Committees and Management.I contend it is unreasonable to express a lack of confidence in management – how else could we have reached a winning position in an All-Ireland Final last September? I consider this a kangaroo court decision, led by a core group of players orchestrated with the help of others outside Galway, motivated by a desire to unjustly extend their lifespan as inter-county players placing personal agendas above the greater good of Galway Hurling.This goes to the very core of what our Association stands for – there is a national danger now that the democratic and voluntary ethos of the GAA is being overrun by groups of players that wish to indulge in the selection and termination of management.Galway Hurling is bigger than any one individual and given that this current impasse shows no immediate sign of abating, I reluctantly conclude that it best that I now step aside. I hold a deep conviction that the current Galway management team is the one best positioned to deliver Galway hurling to the next level and bring All-Ireland Senior success to our county.I thank my family, my management team colleagues and their families for their support and I am very sensitive the hurt they have endured in the very recent past. I salute the county officials and officers and numerous volunteers who have given me magnificent support over the last five years.With Disappointment & Sincerity,print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Email This brings to an end a long-running saga that started shortly after Galway lost the All-Ireland final to Kilkenny in September.last_img read more

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Fears of a dire precedent as Brazil seeks results-based REDD+ payment

first_imgCritics worry that Brazil’s reference level for deforestation and the lack of guarantee that the carbon will stay locked up could set an unsustainable precedent for future payments.The forest reference levels currently used in the proposal are high enough that deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon could double and Brazil would still qualify for “results-based” payments. Almost a decade after it was founded, the Green Climate Fund is ready to start paying tropical countries for emission reductions from REDD+. A proposal from Brazil has been submitted to the Green Climate Fund (GCF) board meeting for payments for 2014 and 2015. But advocates and forest policy experts say the way the emissions-reductions savings are being calculated, and the likely possibility that the reductions will not be permanent, might end up setting a poor precedent for future payouts from REDD+.Scientists agree that reducing deforestation and increasing forest areas play a critical role in keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit). Forests could provide almost a quarter of the cost-effective climate mitigation needed by 2030. However they receive less than 3 percent of climate mitigation funding.“In terms of directing climate finance to forests, we are off by at least an order of magnitude,” Frances Seymour, a renowned forest expert and distinguished senior fellow at the World Resources Institute (WRI), said about REDD+ projects.REDD+ was initially proposed as climate change mitigation mechanism that would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by paying developing countries to keep their forests intact rather than cutting them down. Now the GCF, the multilateral climate fund created under the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), is considering proposals for a pilot program for REDD+ results-based payments at its 22nd  board meeting in South Korea this week.Unlike past REDD+ projects that received funds from the GCF to implement programs, the pilot program, announced in 2017, will pay countries ex-post for results achieved between December 2013 and 2018. The $500 million pilot program will pay $5 per ton of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) and limit each country to 30 percent of the total amount. Proposals are evaluated by a technical board and will be considered on a rolling basis at the GCF board meetings, which are attended by board members and observer NGOs.Choosing the right reference levelSome forest experts have raised concerns about the feasibility based on what they consider clear issues with one of the proposals. In its proposal submitted to the GCF, Brazil says it reduced its emissions in 2014 and 2015 by 1.25 billion tons of CO2e in comparison to the deforestation average from 1996 to 2010. It is requesting payment for 2 percent of that, around 25 million tons of CO2e. The Independent Technical Advisory Panel’s assessment of the proposal recommends paying for 19 million tons. If approved at the GCF rate of $5 per ton of emissions reductions, Brazil would get just over $96 million.But advocates say the 1996-2010 average, the so-called Forest Reference Emission Level (FREL B), represents years in which deforestation in the Amazon was exceptionally high, and doesn’t provide a meaningful comparison.“Under the current reference level, deforestation in Brazil could double and they would still be able to get payments,” said Jutta Kill, a researcher at the World Rainforest Movement and biologist who applies her work to support social movements. “If a different reference level had been chosen that reflects the reality of growing emissions, then Brazil would have had a significantly lower level or no claims at all because emissions are going up.”Not everyone agrees with this assessment.“The FREL of Brazil, recognized by the UNFCCC, is appropriate and scientifically rigorous,” says Daniel Nepstad, president and executive director of the Earth Innovation Institute, who has researched deforestation in Brazil for 30 years. “The risk of claiming otherwise is that it will punish Brazil for its success in lowering deforestation so rapidly through 2012, which created the huge difference between FREL and deforestation today. But this is a measure of Brazil’s success.”Pictorial representation of Brazil’s FREL as submitted to the UNFCCC. FREL (A) refers to the mean annual CO2emissions from the period 1996 to 2005 (1,106,027,616.63tCO2); FR(B) refers to the mean annual CO2emissions from the period 1996 to 2010 (907,959,466.33tCO2). Credit: UNFCCCCurrently, countries can choose their own reference level as long as the technical assessment of the FREL has been finalized by the UNFCCC. Brazil’s case is important in that the FREL for the Amazon biome was the first reference level submitted to the UNFCCC for use in results-based payments.In Brazil, deforestation levels were extremely high from 1996 to 2005, and then dropped substantially. Since 2012, deforestation rates have been creeping up again. Between 2014 and 2015, the years for which Brazil is claiming payments, deforestation in the Amazon increased from 5,012 to 6,207 square kilometers (1,935 to 2,397 square miles), an almost 25 percent increase.“In 2014 and 2015 Brazil had the two worst increases in deforestation since it started to rise again,” said Maria Fernanda Gabara, an anthropologist who works with indigenous communities in Brazil. “It’s really contradictory that they are getting payments for these years.”Keeping the carbon locked upThe Green Climate Fund was set up in 2010 as part of the financial mechanism of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. It has 24 board members, representing an equal number of representatives from developed and developing countries. It seeks to “promote a paradigm shift to low-emission and climate-resilient development.” But some experts are concerned that this mission may be at odds with Brazil’s recent shift in government, and question if the emissions reductions that the GCF is paying for will remain locked up forests.“From a climate perspective, REDD+ can only have a benefit if the carbon is kept sequestered,” Kill said. “There is nothing in the proposal that guarantees to keep the carbon in the trees.”Jair Bolsonaro, the recently elected right-wing president of Brazil, ran on a platform of reducing environmental and legal safeguards for forests. He has signaled his intention to develop the Amazon, which experts say has already led to an increase in deforestation.“The annual rate of deforestation is increasing. Whether [it] stays that way we can’t say for sure,” said Peter May, a professor at the Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro, in an interview. “But last year there was a considerable upswing in deforestation after Bolsonaro got elected.”According to Brazil’s official monitoring system, Deforestation in the Amazon has increased from 4,571 square kilometers (1,765 square miles) in 2012 to almost 8,000 square kilometers (3,090 square miles) in 2018 — the highest in almost a decade.Brazilian Amazon deforestation 2002-2018. Image via Mongabay.One of Bolsonaro’s first moves after taking office in January this year was to move control of indigenous lands and the forest service under jurisdiction of the Ministry of Agriculture, which has been touted as a win for agribusiness.This means there’s a chance that the emissions reductions the GCF would pay for might not be permanent.“Brazil was able to reduce deforestation in the past, but it hasn’t stayed down. Now even though deforestation is on the rise, they will be getting paid,” Thomas Fatheuer, a social scientist with Heinrich Böll Stiftung, a German political foundation focused on green policy, told Mongabay. “It’s like rewarding someone for having quit smoking for a few months, even though they are still smoking today.”Political pressureDespite the problems with the proposal and bad precedent it could set, some believe that political pressures could push the GCF to accept Brazil’s proposal anyway. Bolsonaro has threatened to pull out of the Paris Climate Agreement and recently withdrew his country’s invitation to host COP25, this year’s UNFCCC climate summit, which will instead be held in Chile. Some believe that failure to follow through on environmental pledges like REDD+ payments could provide further fuel to the Bolsonaro administration’s anti-environmental stance.“If the Green Climate Fund and the UNFCCC refuse the proposal from Brazil, that might give Brazil more of excuse to leave the climate agreements,” Federal Rural University’s May said. “So that might act as a push for them to say yes.”Given the pro-development stance of the current government, not being able to fulfill expectations around environmental agreements and mechanisms like REDD+ may become further weaponized by the government.“If we kill [the] GCF contract today,” Nepstad said, “the chance that the new admin will roll back forest conservation policy will grow.”To add to the external political pressure, the GCF board might be feeling the pressure from inside as well. The board came under fire at its meeting last July for failing to approve any of the projects under consideration and disburse funds from the more than $10 billion in pledges it has attracted from countries. The meeting was described as “very difficult” by the chair of the board, Lennart Båge.“They are in a sort of double bind,” Fatheuer said. “REDD+ unfortunately has the perverse implication that by not paying out emissions reductions now, it gives countries like Brazil the justification to say ‘conservation doesn’t work, let’s develop instead.’”Banner image: The tinctorius poison dart frog inhabits the greater Amazon rainforest in Suriname and Northern Brazil. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Sarah Sax is a freelance environmental journalist based in New York City, formerly with Vice News. You can find her on Twitter at @Sarah2theSax.Clarification: This article has been updated to include the the full name of Maria Fernanda GebaraFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this article. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Amazon, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Carbon Finance, climate finance, Environment, Featured, Finance, Forest Carbon, Forest Destruction, Forests, Governance, Rainforests, Redd, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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QPR starlet extends Stevenage stay

first_imgQPR youngster Bruno Andrade has extended his loan spell at Stevenage by another month.The forward is currently in his second loan spell with the League Two side having made 13 league appearances for them last season.He rejoined Borough in February and has gone on to make four further League Two outings – and opened his account for them when he scored the only goal of the game in Tuesday’s 1-0 win over Plymouth.And now it has been confirmed that Andrade, 21, will stay at the Lamex Stadium until March 31. Bruno Andrade 1last_img read more

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How Brazil is Preparing for a Tidal Wave of Data

first_imgFurther reading:German National Football Team Uses Real-Time Analytics for a Competitive EdgeHow Sports Teams are Using Big Data to Improve Performance on the Field3 Ways Football Teams Are Using Technology To Make Players Safer Since their inception, sports and data have gone together like peas and carrots – just ask any baseball statistician, basketball strategist, or horse racing aficionado. These days, the ability to analyze massive amounts of data allows teams to fine tune their recruitment and develop true competitive advantage over their opponents.However, teams and players aren’t the only parties generating data — any large event is going to generate a tidal wave of information, and a month-long, worldwide football tournament is no exception. How can a host country like Brazil prep for the data created by 600,000 frenzied football fans?last_img read more

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How to be resilient in hardship

first_imgMy friend and colleague Amanda alerted me to this article on the five traits of resilient people. Since that quality is needed by so many of us now, I thought I’d pass on the insights from Jessie Sholl. What occurred to me as I was reading this list is that you probably have every one of these qualities. Working for a good cause is a daily exercise in resilience. Please share that quality with those who need it now.1. Be Positive. “Resilient people are characterized by an ability to experience both negative and positive emotions even in difficult or painful situation. They mourn losses and endure frustrations, but they also find redeeming potential or value in most challenges.” If you work for a good cause, you have this quality. You find hope amid terrible tragedies in the course of advancing a mission.2. Live to Learn. When resilient people encounter pain, they look for solutions. That would be you.3. Open Your Heart. Counting your blessings and committing acts of kindness and service boost resilience. That’s your day job!4. Take Care of Yourself. Good physical and mental health boosts resilience. 5. Hang on to Humor. This is so true. A laugh goes a long way. Do you bring levity to the job?For more on these qualities as well as the amazing tale of Turkey Lady, read the whole article.last_img read more

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6 STEPPS to viral success for your cause

first_imgby Kate Olsen, VP of Strategic Projects at Network for Good @Kate4GoodFellow cause marketers, wouldn’t you like a dollar for every time someone told you to ‘make it go viral?’ The beauty and frustration of virality is that you never know what will catch on. Context, creativity and conversation all have to align to get tens, hundreds or thousands of people to talk about your idea at the same time. We may not be able to make things go viral by sheer force of will, but Jonah Berger has a few ideas about how to engineer messages and campaigns that are more likely to spread. Below are a few tips from his new book Contagious: Why Things Catch On. Jonah outlines six key STEPPS that will transform your cause marketing messages into content that will entertain, inspire and incite people to spread the word.1. Social Currency: How will talking about your campaign affect the sharer’s status in his/her community? Will it make the sharer look knowledgeable, in the know, generous?Example: Packaging your message in a slick piece of media, such as the documentary Girl Rising, makes it easy for people to recommend – they seem intellectual, generous and pop culture savvy.2. Triggers: Can you relate your message to a context or habit that is already part of the sharer’s daily life? Examples: Workplace giving and volunteering as a social norm, giving a $1 at checkout, or this NYC Department of Health anti-soda campaign 3. Emotion: Does sharing your message move people emotionally? Can you touch the heart?Examples: Charity: Water puts the supporter as the hero of the campaign, showcasing the personal connection to the cause to share with social networks. This RedSnappa video epitomizes making an emotional connection with your message.4. Public: Can you add a social proof element to your message so people can see that others support your cause?Examples: Movember mustaches, breast cancer pink ribbons, Livestrong yellow bracelets, ‘I Voted’ stickers5. Practical Value: Does spreading your message help people help others? What is the impact you are driving?Example: Causes that make the supporter experience tangible include Dress for Success and Adopt A Classroom. Consumer campaigns that make a tangible donation alongside a useful product include One Pack = One Vaccine and FEED Projects.6. Stories: Is your message or campaign related to a larger narrative people want to share? Examples: Ben & Jerry’s went to congress with a 900 Pound Baked Alaska to protest drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. (Ben & Jerry’s made a social statement but used their product to illustrate their point, that makes the story sticky relevant and memorable.)Want to know how to craft a powerful story? Download this archived webinar presentation from Jonah Sachs on ‘Winning the Story Wars’.P.S. Thank you to PointWorthy for recommending this fabulous read.last_img read more

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