Tag: 南京夜网

Rain doesn’t dampen spirits as Pope Francis visits Knock Shrine

first_imgPope Francis and 45,000 pilgrims fell silent in prayer at Knock Shrine as the rain persisted through the Papal Visit this morning. The pontiff visited the Marian Shrine at Knock today to greet tens of thousands of followers on his second day of World Meeting of Families events in Ireland.Popemobile travels through the estate of Knock Shrine #popeinireland pic.twitter.com/yr3kYhqXv0— RTÉ News (@rtenews) August 26, 2018 Pope Francis waved to the cheering rain-soaked crowds from his Popemobile before arriving at the Apparition Chapel to lead a silent prayer in front of the statue of Our Lady for all victims of abuse.The pontiff said he had “presented to her in particular all the victims of abuse of whatever kind committed by members of the Church in Ireland.”“None of us can fail to be moved by the stories of young people who suffered abuse, were robbed of their innocence and left scarred, distanced from their mothers, abandoned and left with painful memories.“This open wound challenges us to be firm and decisive in the pursuit of truth and justice,” Pope Francis said. The Pope also led the crowd in a recital of the Angelus. He then returned to Ireland West Airport Knock to travel back to Dublin for the Papal Mass in Phoenix Park.Half a million people are expected to attend the open air mass in Dublin this afternoon – marking the largest event of the weekend.Rain doesn’t dampen spirits as Pope Francis visits Knock Shrine was last modified: August 26th, 2018 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

This embryo-inspired bandage is 17 times stickier than a Band-Aid

first_imgA new Jell-O–like bandage heals wounds quickly when placed on skin. This embryo-inspired bandage is 17 times stickier than a Band-Aid By Eva FrederickJul. 24, 2019 , 2:15 PM Xin You, Jianyu Li Inspired by the superfast wound closing process in human embryos, a new, Jell-O–like wound dressing can contract in response to the skin’s heat, drawing the edges of wounds together for quicker, safer healing. So far, researchers have tested the material only in mice. If the new bandage works as well in people, it could offer new treatment options for everything from minor wounds to chronic injuries.“I think this is a breakthrough in general, in wound management,” says Mohsen Akbari, a bioengineer at the University of Victoria in Canada who was not involved with the study.Traditional wound dressings like gauze and cloth bandages heal passively by keeping skin moist and holding any medicines close to the injury. The new bandage instead uses temperature-sensitive materials to draw together wounded tissue and silver nanoparticles to kill harmful microbes. “This is more of an active healing,” says Serena Blacklow, a bioengineer in medical school at the University of California, San Francisco, and one of the paper’s co–first authors.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The project began as Blacklow’s undergraduate thesis project at Harvard University. She and David Mooney, a bioengineer there, wanted to create a tough, adhesive wound dressing that could facilitate fast, safe healing for wounds large and small. They were inspired by the seamless and scar-free healing process scientists have observed in animal embryos.In adult wounds, skin cells called keratinocytes slowly crawl across the injury to cover the wounded area. But when an embryo is wounded in the lab, it heals quickly and efficiently as thin filaments of a protein called actin quickly draw the edges of the wound together like a purse string.With this in mind, Blacklow and her colleagues began with a gellike substance from seaweed called alginate. To make it contract in response to heat, they mixed in a widely used temperature-sensitive polymer that shrinks at about 32°C. (Human skin typically has a temperature of 37°C.) The shrinking action pulls together the skin beneath, drawing in the edges of the wound.Once they had this temperature-responsive gel, the researchers needed to make sure it would stick to both healthy and wounded skin. They solved this problem using another material from the ocean: chitosan, a long, linear sugar molecule from the hard outer skeleton of shellfish. Chitosan penetrates both the skin and the hydrogel, linking them, whereas other bonding agents fuse them together with even more sticking power. Thanks to these ingredients, the gel is more than 17 times as sticky as a Band-Aid, ensuring it does not peel away from the wounded area.To give the bandage antimicrobial properties, the researchers added silver nanoparticles. The particles stay in the gel while releasing a steady stream of silver ions, which are deadly to most infection-causing bacteria. The team then tested the bandage on wounded mice, which healed far more quickly with the bandage than without: Wounds closed halfway in less than 5 days versus a week or more for untreated wounds, the team reports today in Science Advances.The gels are also relatively cheap compared with many alternatives. The raw materials to create the gel cost about $0.14 per bandage. To make a similar-size piece of Apligraf, a commercially available wound healing treatment made of living cells, the materials cost about $154.Akbari is interested in seeing the effects of this bandage on diabetic wounds, which heal differently from normal wounds. In diabetes, cell growth slows and blood flow to extremities is reduced. The bandage has a long way to go before it could hit the market. The researchers plan to test the technology on other animals before they seek Food and Drug Administration approval.last_img read more

Verdict will restore people’s faith in IPL, says Justice Mudgal

first_imgThe suspension of Chennai Super Kings and Rajasthan Royals is only a temporary setback to the IPL and the Lodha Committee verdict will actually help restore people’s faith in the League, says Justice Mukul Mudgal, who headed the Committee which probed the IPL betting scam.Two-time champions CSK and inaugural winners Rajasthan Royals (RR) were today suspended for two years and their respective co-owners Gurunath Meiyappan and Raj Kundra were suspended for life from being involved in all activities related to cricket matches for bringing game to disrepute.”This is a very strong punishment. I think it will have a good affect on IPL, BCCI and the players. Many people feel it will have an adverse affect on the game but I think this is a temporary setback and cricket will come out cleaner and people’s faith on IPL will be restored,” Mudgal said.The punishment was handed by a Supreme Court-appointed three-member committee headed by former CJI R M Lodha.Former BCCI Secretary Niranjan Shah said BCCI could have avoided such a situation if it had taken proper action earlier on the matter.”I think BCCI took whatever action was to be taken although it was slow. They did not visualise that this would go to Supreme Court. We could have avoided this earlier, we have to take a lesson,” he said.Former BCCI president AC Muthiah said, “Whatever has happened in BCCI, nobody stood up for the wrong doing. All this rules were already in place but they were done to suit individuals. I think, IPL should be kept alive and BCCI needs to distance itself from IPL. It should be run by an independent body comprising eminent people.”advertisementBCCI lawyer, C Aryama Sundaram said he did not entirely agree with the decision to suspend the two teams for such a long period of time.”It doesn’t surprise me that Gurunath Meiyappan and Raj Kundra have been found guilty and so the punishment wasn’t unexpected either. I do find a slight problem on purely legal platform as to the suspension of the two teams for that long period,” he said.”It was found it was an individual act, done by a person. The team itself didn’t indulge in match fixing activity. So unless you find a team is collectively to be blamed, I do wonder if the team should be meted with such consequence. I think it is an upset for the entire league,” Sundaram added.Former BCCI chief Inderjit Singh Bindra also hailed the decision.”A historic and landmark order. Beginning of the process of cleansing Indian cricket. I do hope that BCCI learns the right lessons,” he wrote on his twitter handle.Bindra also said that ICC Chairman N Srinivasan, father-in-law of Meiyappan, should also be put to task by BCCI for his role.”Srini is obviously guilty of protecting Guru and CSK.BCCI should take immediate action against him by withdrawing his nomination to ICC. NS (Srinivasan) has no moral authority to continue as head of ICC. He should step down immediately, failing which Board should take action,” he tweeted.Former India wicket-keeper Syed Kirmani said,” It is unfortunate that such malpractices have cropped in the game. I think it is unfortunate for the players of these two teams.They have been playing at the highest level. So where they gonna go. But I guess it won’t matter as there are so many tournaments.”The social networking site was abuzz with reactions from former players such as Sanjay Manjrekar and Bishan Bedi.Manjrekar tweeted: “Whatever needs to be done to get complete trust of the fans in the game has to be done. Fans make or break this game.”Bedi wrote: “Justice Lodha committee after Justice Mudgal findings comes as breath of fresh air, but only just! There’s more muck for Cricket 2 breathe afresh!”last_img read more

Your quick guide to better nonprofit financial management

first_imgIf you feel the need to strengthen your financial management savvy, check out StrongNonprofits.org, a new website featuring free tools, how-tos and guides.Developed in partnership between The Wallace Foundation and Fiscal Management Associates, the site contains more than 64 resources for anyone involved in nonprofit financial planning, monitoring, operations or oversight, and particularly nonprofit afterschool program providers. Features range from a nonprofit accounting guide, to an article on sensible growth strategies, to a podcast on how to understand the true costs of programming. The site also offers an array of helpful tools, including the “Go or No Go Decision Tool,” a questionnaire that helps an organization decide whether accepting a contract would help – or hurt – the group’s bottom line.The site includes:• A Five-Step Guide to Budget Development—a presentation that describes a team approach to budgeting essentials such as setting financial goals, forecasting results and monitoring progress.• Budgeting and Financial Planning Tools—Excel-based templates to provide organizations with a framework for building program-based budgets, projecting cash flow, and evaluating revenue scenarios.• Guide to Effective Board Leadership—an easy-to-follow description of how nonprofit boards can do the necessary financial oversight of their organizations.You can find the site here.last_img read more

Video lessons in how to make a vast problem relatable

first_imgI’m back from the Nonprofit Technology Conference. At one of my sessions, I talked about the importance of taking the vast problems we seek to address and the critical importance of translating them into a scale that is:1.) Relatable2.) Addressable and3) InspiringWhen we fail to do this, we overwhelm people and create the impression their support won’t make a dent in our social problem.Here are examples of making this translation. At the conference, See3, YouTube, NTEN and Cisco announced these videos were among the winners of the 2013 DoGooder Video Awards. They take big, faraway issues and make them immediate to the kinds of people who are likely to take action for that cause. They stake a point of view with a clear audience. And they inspire action in a funny way. Enjoy.last_img read more

How To Get Donations? 14 Reasons Why People Donate

first_imgThe Secret to Getting People to Give: Giving isn’t a business transaction. It’s a human connection. To inspire donors to give, you need to make a meaningful connection by showing them why they matter and how they can make a difference. When you understand why your donors give, you’ll be able to make a more effective appeal.Don’t be afraid to reach out to your donors personally and find out why they give. Their stories matter, and sharing them create inspiration for others to follow their example. (If you don’t have an easy way to keep track of your relationships with your donors, check out Network for Good’s easy donor management system.)That being said, here are some of the top reasons why donors give:Someone I know asked me to give, and I wanted to help themFelt emotionally moved by someone’s storyWant to feel I’m not powerless in the face of need and can help (this is especially true during disasters)Want to feel I’m changing someone’s lifeFeel a sense of closeness to a community or groupWant to memorialize someone (who is struggling or died of a disease, for example)Was raised to give to charity—it’s tradition in my familyWant to be “hip,” and supporting this charity (i.e., wearing a yellow wristband) is in styleIt makes me feel connected to other people and builds my social networkWant to have a good image of myself/my companyWant to leave a legacy that perpetuates me, my ideas or my causeFeel fortunate and want to give something back to othersGive for religious reasons—my faith teaches me to help othersWant to be seen as a leader/role modelGet the right tool to help you raise more money for your cause. Learn more about Network for Good’s fundraising products.Remember: The act of giving is immediate:Give your donors the opportunity to act here and now. Your relationship with them will be long-term, but their willingness to give is now—let them act on it.There are many reasons why people give. When you’re crafting your next fundraising appeal, take this list out and ask yourself if you’ve tapped into these reasons. People act from the heart, not the head:Yes, your nonprofit has to show that it’s a good steward of donor money and you need to impart where all that generosity is going, but your appeal must contain more than numbers and pie charts.center_img Giving is a personal act:Your appeals need to be donor-centric. Make sure to tell your donor why they should care, and why they matter to your organization. Learn more about crafting your call-to-action and writing personal emails.last_img read more

In Urban and Rural India, Study Identifies Harmful and Unnecessary Practices in Health Facilities

first_imgPosted on December 5, 2012November 13, 2014Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)A new post, Above All, Do No Harm: The Sad State of Health Care Quality in Rural Madhya Pradesh, on the Center for Global Development Blog offers an informative summary of a recent publication, In Urban And Rural India, A Standardized Patient Study Showed Low Levels Of Provider Training And Huge Quality Gaps, in Health Affairs that explores major challenges with quality of care in public and private health facilities in India.From the blog post:The study finds serious deficits in quality. Interactions between patients and providers were short (3.6 minutes on average) and the emphasis in both sectors was to give several medications to the patient as quickly as possible.Across all cases, the correct treatment protocol was followed 30% of the time, while unnecessary or harmful treatment was prescribed or dispensed 42% of the time. Only one-third of providers articulated a diagnosis, correct or incorrect. When a diagnosis was issued, close to half were wrong, and only 12% were fully correct.What’s going on?Read the full post on the Center for Global Development Blog.Access the full publication in Health Affairs.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Apply Now! Exciting Fellowships for Maternal Health Professionals

first_imgNew Voices FellowshipThe New Voices Fellowship—hosted by the Aspen Institute, an educational and policy organization — is now seeking nominations for its next round of fellows. The fellowship provides an opportunity for current health and development professionals to harness their media, communications, and leadership skills in order to share their work and messages with a large international audience. The fellowship is not full-time, but does require a significant amount of dedication in order to write articles, participate in interviews for local and international media, and speak at international conferences.Former fellows have come from countries throughout Africa and South East Asia and must be from a developing country. The work of these fellows has been featured in a variety of news and media publications: such as, NPR, TEDx conferences, BBC, Think Africa Press, Reuters, The New York Times, Forbes, The Atlantic, and others. There is an incredible amount of pioneering work happening around the world, but it is not always communicated. Amplifying the voices of maternal health leaders raises awareness of critical issues and shares successes that others can learn from and implement.Click here to nominate someone for the New Voices Fellowship and to review information on the nomination process and frequently asked questions. Share this: Posted on October 8, 2014November 2, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Two fellowship opportunities are now available. Please review the information below.Takemi FellowshipThe Harvard School of Public Health is pleased to announce that two Takemi Fellows will be supported annually by a grant from the Ford Foundation to contribute to leadership development and build capacity for sexual and reproductive health policy in Africa. The focal countries include Ghana, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and the Gambia. Strong candidates from French-speaking West African countries can apply if they have strong English language skills.Applicants should propose a project that relates to youth development, sexuality, reproductive health and rights, and includes a broad approach that places these issues within the overall developmental aspirations of youth. The proposal should include an analysis of a critical policy problem related to youth sexuality, with the goal of developing a policy brief to identify specific actions that could be implemented upon return home.Applications and proposals for the 2015-16 Academic Year (August 2015 – June 2016) must be received by March 1, 2015.Required Application MaterialsApplication information sheet (pdf) (word)Curriculum vitaePublications listShort sample of something you have published in EnglishProposal of research and writing to be undertaken during the FellowshipThree letters of referencePlease contact Amy Levin with any questions alevin@hsph.harvard.edu ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:,Two fellowship opportunities are now available. Please review the information below.Takemi FellowshipThe Harvard School of Public Health is pleased to announce that two Takemi Fellows will be supported annually by a grant from the Ford Foundation to contribute to leadership development and build capacity for sexual and reproductive health policy in Africa. The focal countries include Ghana, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and the Gambia. Strong candidates from French-speaking West African countries can apply if they have strong English language skills.Applicants should propose a project that relates to youth development, sexuality, reproductive health and rights, and includes a broad approach that places these issues within the overall developmental aspirations of youth. The proposal should include an analysis of a critical policy problem related to youth sexuality, with the goal of developing a policy brief to identify specific actions that could be implemented upon return home.Applications and proposals for the 2015-16 Academic Year (August 2015 – June 2016) must be received by March 1, 2015.Required Application MaterialsApplication information sheet (pdf) (word)Curriculum vitaePublications listShort sample of something you have published in EnglishProposal of research and writing to be undertaken during the FellowshipThree letters of referencePlease contact Amy Levin with any questions alevin@hsph.harvard.edu New Voices FellowshipThe New Voices Fellowship—hosted by the Aspen Institute, an educational and policy organization — is now seeking nominations for its next round of fellows. The fellowship provides an opportunity for current health and development professionals to harness their media, communications, and leadership skills in order to share their work and messages with a large international audience. The fellowship is not full-time, but does require a significant amount of dedication in order to write articles, participate in interviews for local and international media, and speak at international conferences.Former fellows have come from countries throughout Africa and South East Asia and must be from a developing country. The work of these fellows has been featured in a variety of news and media publications: such as, NPR, TEDx conferences, BBC, Think Africa Press, Reuters, The New York Times, Forbes, The Atlantic, and others. There is an incredible amount of pioneering work happening around the world, but it is not always communicated. Amplifying the voices of maternal health leaders raises awareness of critical issues and shares successes that others can learn from and implement.Click here to nominate someone for the New Voices Fellowship and to review information on the nomination process and frequently asked questions.last_img read more

Women in Philanthropy Profile: LaVondra Dobbs

first_imgBased in New Orleans, Via Link provides information, referrals, training, and crisis intervention to individuals, organizations, and communities so they can help themselves and others. LaVondra Dobbs, joined the organization five years ago as Programs and Services Director, and within a year, was offered the CEO position after the former CEO retired. She leads a team of 20 full-time employees, 35 part-time staff, and five volunteers to provide people with help finding available resources such as housing, food, mental health services, health care, and suicide prevention across southeast Louisiana.211Via Link’s flagship program, 211, is a free, 24-hour hotline that was designated by the FCC in 2001 as the Health and Human Services Hotline. Via Link staff researches, compiles, and updates a directory of free, public resources serving 10 parishes, or counties, in New Orleans, and works with the other 211s operating across the state. The hotline provides health and human services ranging from the location of the nearest food bank or food pantry to shelter locations, help with rent or utility bills, and respite from taking care of an elderly parent or child with disability.The Early YearsVia Link started in 1928 when a group of volunteers banded together to provide a directory of available resources for people in need. For almost 50 years, Via Link existed as a group of volunteers compiling and distributing resource directories for the greater New Orleans area, until officially becoming a 501(c)(3) in 1972.In addition to 211, Via Link provides crisis work, including managing the Louisiana branch of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-TALK). With a network of 160 agencies, the calls first go to New York before being routed to the agency closest to the caller’s area code. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) oversees the Lifeline and designates $7-$12 million a year to the national program. However, the stipend for centers like Via Link is only $1,500 a year. To pay for that one phone line, Dobbs raises approximately $400,000 a year. As a result, Via Link can field an average of 1,300 calls a month from Louisiana residents in need of crisis or suicide prevention assistance.Four years ago, Dobbs noticed that teens weren’t calling the Lifeline, so she raised independent funds to launch their Crisis Teen Textline. Prior to launching the Textline, everything was done by phone, but Via Link only received 54 calls to the Lifeline from youth age 13-22; an age group prone to suicide attempts. Since launching the Textline they have had about 62,000 conversations with youth.“My grandfather completed suicide when I was about 12 years old and that’s always weighed heavily on my mind. I don’t have the clinical degree, but I can use my business sense to make the resources available for those who are trained to do this work. I love the diversity of individuals and organizations that I work with. It takes a certain amount of creativity to sustain and be profitable in this environment. I really enjoy that challenge.”Diversifying FundingWhen Dobbs came on as CEO, Via Link was on the brink of closing after years of being solely grant supported. With degrees in economics and business administration, she knew things had to change.“If we were going to sustain the organization, I had to diversify our income. One of the first things I did was develop the Crisis Teen Textline, followed by an online chat option. We had been doing everything by phone and not taking advantage of new technology. I used the little bit of reserve dollars I had to build our capacity, and then found other streams of income. It was a delicate balance.”Much of those other streams of income came through crisis work with the Health and Human Services agencies around Louisiana. Under Dobbs’ leadership, Via Link is now cashflow positive and no longer dependent on any one funder. Today, Via Link is predominantly supported by HHS contracts, along with a few grants and state funding for the Lifeline.“Being able to visualize that goal and make it a reality was a great feeling. CEOs truly must understand their funding sources. The relationships with those funders and developing other funding streams is crucial. There have been people in foundations who have made my goals possible because they introduced me to other people and got me in doors I knew I needed to get through.”Collaboration and RelationshipsSince becoming a Network for Good customer, Dobbs has dedicated her time and energy to board development and fundraising. In this past year, she’s seen an increase in regular donations. When the only other crisis center in Louisiana hit financial trouble, Dobbs worked with them on how to close their operation and shift the contract to Via Link to sustain the services for the community.When it comes to fundraising, Dobbs is a big proponent of networking with other agencies and combining resources to offer something to the community. In 2018, she teamed up with Family Service to pitch an idea at the Greater New Orleans Foundation “Pitch-It Competition” and was able to leverage their second-place win into funding for their idea for the next three years.“You cannot be in your own little silo. You’ve got to get out and expand.”Women in Philanthropy is an ongoing blog series in celebration of Women’s History Month, featuring some of the incredible women Network for Good has the pleasure to work with.Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

Best Practices for Implementing the WHO Safe Childbirth Checklist: Engaging Staff and Stakeholders

first_imgFor more information on Safe Childbirth Checklist implementation, please email info@ariadnelabs.org.Download the Safe Childbirth Checklist and Implementation Guide in English, French or Spanish here.Share this: Posted on September 8, 2016September 26, 2016By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)According to the World Health Organization (WHO), of the more than 130 million births occurring worldwide each year, approximately 303,000 end in maternal death, 2.6 million in stillbirth and 2.7 million in newborn death within 28 days of delivery. Most of these deaths take place in low-resource settings and are preventable with timely and appropriate interventions. However, providers do not always know, remember or have the supplies to implement these life-saving interventions, especially in emergency situations. Checklists remind health providers of necessary steps for routine deliveries as well as situations involving complications.The WHO Safe Childbirth Checklist (SCC), a set of evidence-based birth practices addressing major causes of maternal death, intrapartum-related stillbirths and neonatal deaths, is designed around four pause points during childbirth: on admission; just prior to delivery; within one hour of birth; and before discharge. The SCC identifies preventative practices, such as handwashing and antibiotic preparation, to avoid or manage complications like infection, hemorrhage and obstructed labor.Last month, scientists at Ariadne Labs, a collaboration between Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, hosted Implementing Checklists for Quality Improvement: Best Practices Along the Implementation Pathway – “Engage”, the second webinar in their interactive series dedicated to sharing lessons learned in implementing the SCC for quality improvement. Presenters explored how to ensure buy-in and identify relevant stakeholders, establish an implementation team and utilize best practices in checklist adaptation. Dr. Rosemary Ogu shared her team’s experience piloting a program using the Safe Childbirth Checklist in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.Engaging staff and stakeholdersAccording to the Ariadne team, effective implementation of the SCC relies on three core processes: engaging staff and stakeholders, formally launching the checklist and providing ongoing support for the team. The following steps are crucial to the ‘engage’ process:1. Determine program goals and gain buy-in.According to Dr. Joanna Paladino, Assistant Director of Implementation, Serious Illness Care Program at Ariadne Labs, teams who plan to implement the SCC should first consider their overarching goals: “What do you hope to accomplish with the program?” “How will the checklist improve quality of care?” “What impact will it have on staff?” Dr. Paladino encouraged teams to define a collaborative mission statement and set clear program goals.Another fundamental step in ensuring successful uptake of the SCC is to gain buy-in by building partnerships at the local, district, regional and national levels. Engaging leadership is also important as it shows the facility that implementing the checklist is a priority and helps ensure access to relevant resources. Moreover, according to Dr. Paladino, this step involves leveraging a collective effort:“Engaging and gaining buy-in is about changing hearts and minds. It’s bringing people into this effort so you that you do this as a team and everyone owns it and has a voice in the work.”Coordinating one-on-one conversations with team members is a highly effective way to gather feedback and convince team members of the SCC’s benefits.  When considering whom to involve in this step, the Ariadne team abides by its guiding principle, “Everyone who will be touched by the intervention should be engaged in this work.” Do not avoid the skeptics. Speaking with those who may not be enthusiastic about the SCC helps teams work through challenges and strengthen their implementation strategy.Dr. Ogu, an obstetrician gynecologist at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital in Nigeria, explained that her team knew poor quality of care was contributing to high maternal mortality rates at the hospital (in 2013, maternal mortality rates were 143 per 100,000 live births among registered patients and 7,857 per 100,000 live births among those who did not register for antenatal care). Thus, the team’s goal in using the checklist was to improve compliance with best practices among health care workers. Findings from focus group data show that as a result of piloting the SCC, midwives and doctors at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital in Nigeria felt better equipped to counsel patients, prepare for emergencies and remember all the steps necessary to provide high quality care.2. Create an implementation team and identify a champion.As Dr. William Berry, Ariadne Labs Chief Medical Officer and Director, Safe Surgery Program, emphasized, identifying a passionate champion is key to implementing the SCC in health facilities: “You need to find somebody who people look up to – it does not mean they need to be a boss or chief or supervisor … the person people go to for advice on the frontlines often makes a great champion, whether they hold a formal title or not.”Dr. Berry also emphasized the importance of forming a multidisciplinary team representative of the various roles that will be affected by the SCC, including physicians, nurses, birth attendants, pharmacists, lab technicians, administrators and coaches.3. Conduct a needs assessment.According to Dr. Paladino, this step is often skipped but is a critical element of successful implementation. Teams should ask themselves what they need to be ready to implement the SCC, including leadership support, resources and system capabilities. They should also reflect on prior quality improvement experiences and perform gap analyses to identify which supplies, human resources, referral systems and funding sources are available or missing.4. Adapt and own the WHO Safe Childbirth Checklist.Most importantly, teams should take the core framework presented in the SCC and customize it for their specific setting. It is essential for leaders to read the checklist thoroughly and discuss each item with their team. The SCC is a tool that should be compatible with the natural workflow of each facility. As Dr. Berry articulated“It’s not the WHO’s checklist – it’s the facility’s checklist … The workflow is built around the people and processes of those people. If you don’t respect those, the checklist will get put down.”—Watch the webinar and download the slides here.Missed the first webinar in the series?Read our summary post from the first webinar: Lessons Learned from Implementing the WHO Safe Childbirth Checklist.Watch the first webinar and download the slideshow.Join the BetterBirth Community.Learn more about the launch of the checklist and the Safe Childbirth Checklist Case Study in Namibia. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Next Page »