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Lurgybrack Autism Centre boosted by ‘Race Across America’ equipment

first_imgLurgybrack Autism Centre were delighted to welcome Arthur McMahon, Gerard Callaghan, Gavin Harris, Boyd Robinson and Grace Ann McGarvey from The Donegal Oil Foundation to the school.Last summer, the team of four local men, supported by a large crew from all over Donegal, cycled 3,000 miles across America, from Oceanside in California to Annapolis in Maryland, in the World’s Toughest Bicycle Race. In doing so, they raised money for schools in Donegal which cater for children on the Autism Spectrum.Lurgybrack Autism Centre gratefully received €1,000 worth of funding for active equipment for the children.Lurgybrack Autism Centre were delighted to take delivery of three wonderful bikes and a foot twister, all supplied locally by LK Bikes – fantastic resources which will encourage the children to become more active, provide them with a fun way to exercise as well as supporting their physical and emotional development. “The school wish the express their sincere thanks to Arthur McMahon, Managing Director of Donegal Oil Company, to the Donegal Oil Cycling Team and everyone involved in The Foundation for their support,” the school said.Lurgybrack Autism Centre boosted by ‘Race Across America’ equipment was last modified: February 2nd, 2019 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Arthur McMahonBoyd RobinsonDonegal Oil FoundationGavin HarrisGerard CallaghanGrace Ann McGarveyLurgybrack Autism Centrelast_img read more

Trade Port to boost KZN exports

first_img7 July 2008Fixed investment in and exports from KwaZulu-Natal province are set to increase with the completion of the R6.5-billion Dube Trade Port – the largest single government infrastructure investment in the province – to the north of Durban.“The catalytic impact of this project will not be confined to the growth node in the costal area north of Durban, but will reverberate across the entire province and position KwaZulu-Natal as a destination of choice for domestic and international tourists,” KwaZulu-Natal Premier Sibusiso Ndebele told delegates at the International Investment Council in San Lameer in May.The council, attended by President Thabo Mbeki, Deputy President Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka and Cabinet members, drew on the insights of distinguished international business leaders on how to meet the challenges of economic growth in South Africa.By the time of its completion ahead of the 2010 Fifa World Cup, the Dube Trade Port itself will have contributed an estimated R12.4-billion to the economy and created thousands of new jobs.According to statistics, the Durban port is the busiest port city on the African continent and ideally located to access the international shipping routes between East and West. It is also the largest of South Africa’s seven ports.It handles in excess of 31.4-million tons of cargo a year, with a value in excess of R100-billion per annum – approximately 65% of the value of all cargo going through South African ports.According to a report released by Quantec data, KwaZulu-Natal’s top export destinations in 2005 were the United States, Japan, India, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Germany.More than R3-billion has been set aside for investment in Durban port’s infrastructure since 2002 for various improvements that include the construction of cargo terminals, Ndebele said.The province’s second port – Richard’s Bay – is also South Africa’s premier bulk cargo handling port and is one of the fastest growing industrial areas in the province, and the centre of operations for South Africa’s aluminium industry.Trade gatewayNdebele further told delegates that the foreign private companies had invested over R27-billion in the province between 2000 and 2005, enabling provincial economic growth to rise from 1% in 1999 to 5.3% in 2005.Since then, he said, the province had seen further groundbreaking fixed direct investments, while nearly a third of South Africa’s manufactured exports were produced in the province.These include the R2.4-billion expansion of Toyota’s plant outside Durban, a new R2.5-billion plant by United Pulp in Richards Bay, a R2-billion expansion at Sappi Saiccor at Umkomaas, and a R650-million investment by Tata in a steel plant in Richard’s Bay.In addition, an almost R20-billion investment is on the cards in the KwaZulu-Natal north coast for a “city within a city” project, modelled on the Dubai Palm complex in the Arab emirate.“These private investments are particularly encouraging for us and they are aligned to our national industrial policy,” said Ndebele. “KwaZulu-Natal has also recently undergone rapid industrialisation, thanks to its abundant water supply and labour resources.”Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Jefferson City college expects to close its door

first_imgWith an unexpected development, Metro Business College has made the announcement that they plan to close its campuses in Jefferson City, along with Cape Giradeau and Rolla, by the end of the year.The founder and president, George Holske said declining enrollment and the increased costs have forced the decision to close.The private college focused on training medical office personnel, administrative assistants and coding specialists.last_img

It’s raining cash in Punjab assembly poll rallies

first_imgAhead of assembly polls, it has been raining cash in Punjab as currency notes are being thrown during the candidates’ election campaigns.On Wednesday wads of notes were thrown in the air during poll rallies of at least two candidates — one each from the Congress and the Shiromani Akali Dal (SAD) — in violation of the election commission’s guidelines.Currencies of Rs 100 and Rs 20 denominations were thrown in the air at a rally of Congress candidate from Ferozepur, Parminder Singh Pinky.The notes were thrown by Congress workers, evidently to celebrate the filing of nomination papers by Pinky soon after he came out of the Ferozepur sub-divisional magistrate’s office. Many rickshaw-pullers and drummers, who were part of the rally and even onlookers barged into the crowd and started picking the notes.A similar incident took place in Malerkotla in Sangrur district from where the wife of former DGP Izhar Alam is contesting on a SAD ticket. Alam, accompanied by wife Farzana, held a show of strength with a cavalcade of motorcycles, cars and SUVs. Amid party flags and posters of SAD, there were Rs 10 currency notes raining at the venue.last_img read more

Banned Neymar out of Copa America

first_imgBrazil’s Neymar has been banned for four matches after being sent off at the Copa America and will play no further part in the tournament, the South American football federation CONMEBOL said on Friday.The striker was dismissed at the end of Brazil’s defeat by Colombia on Wednesday for his part in a fracas after the final whistle. CONMEBOL said in a statement it had suspended him as a consequence of his dismissal and incidents after?? the match at Santiago’s Monumental Stadium.Chilean referee Enrique Osses said in his report of the match that Neymar had waited for him in the tunnel and insulted him as he headed for the dressing rooms.CONMEBOL, which also fined the player $10,000, said Brazil had the right to appeal. The South Americans have one remaining group match, against Venezuela on Sunday and could then face three knockout matches if they reach the final. Neymar was central to the fracas at Monumental Stadium two days ago. After the final whistle he kicked the ball hard at an opponent. Colombia reacted angrily and almost every player on the pitch was involved in pushing and shoving.Colombia’s Carlos Bacca was also shown a red card and had been suspended for two matches, CONMEBOL said. Neymars absence will be a huge loss not just for Brazil but for the entire tournament. Along with Argentinas Lionel Messi, he is the biggest name.He inspired Brazil to victory over Peru in their first Copa game before being frustrated by the Colombians in a tetchy re-run of their World Cup quarterfinal last year. Neymar was taken off the ground on a stretcher with a broken vertebrae after a clumsy challenge by Colombia defender Juan Zuniga and in his absence, Brazil lost their semi-final 7-1 to Germany.advertisementlast_img read more

ATA BOARD VACANCY

first_imgThe ATA would like to advise all members and interested parties that there is a position vacant on the ATA Board of Directors. With this in mind the Chairman of the Board is seeking expressions of interest from interested parties. Please read the attached document for all of the information. INFORMATION ON EXPRESSION OF INTEREST FOR BOARD VACANCYlast_img

The 6 things you must know about the science of persuasion

first_imgIf you have never read the classic book Influence by Robert Cialdini, you really should. But you’re also in luck, because the Influence at Work team just released this summary of the six principles of persuasion that the book covers. Spend 11 minutes watching this video – it’s well worth your time.Trouble viewing the video? Go here.No time to watch? Here’s my summary of the principles and how they apply to us.1. Reciprocity – People tend to return a favor, thus all those annoying address labels charities send out as a fundraising ploy.2. Scarcity – Perceived scarcity fuels demand. “Only four memberships are left” prompts action!3. Authority – People will tend to obey authority figures. What expert can attest to the value of your organization?4. Consistency – If people commit to an idea or goal, they are more likely to follow through. It’s why pledging is a great option for people who aren’t ready to take action.5. Liking – People are easily persuaded by other people whom they like. That’s why you want your champions spreading the word about your cause among their friends and family.6. Consensus – People will do what other people are doing. That’s why it’s great to show who is taking action for your cause – others are likely to conform.last_img read more

Dig Into Your Donor Database

first_imgThe Giving USA 2015 Annual Report on Philanthropy, released in July, announced that charitable giving, while growing steadily over the past five years, has reached its highest level since the Great Recession—an increase of 7.1% over 2013 totals. Donors of all kinds—individuals, foundations, and corporations—are back, baby! They have recovered from the economic setback of 2008 and are feeling more confident than ever to invest in charitable causes across the country.The future has never looked better for the nonprofit sector, right? After all, the study shows that more donors than ever are making gifts. You may be wondering how to start building your donor base to welcome these new donors to your mission. “If only more donors knew about us, just think how much more money we would be raising” may very well be crossing your mind right now. As tempting a thought as this may be, the truth is that the grass is not greener with a whole new set of donors. It’s greener exactly wherever you are watering it. Let’s drill this down a little bit further: 43%. That’s the median donor retention rate that the Fundraising Effectiveness Project (FEP) calculated from the 2012–13 fundraising results of its survey respondents. This means that, on average, many organizations are losing almost 60% of their donors each year. Why? Many reasons. Some, like changes in personal circumstances, are out of the control of any organization. On the other hand, according to the 2014 Burk Donor Survey, nearly 50% of respondents cited reasons like over solicitation, overhead costs, and the lack of demonstrated impact as influencing their decision to stop giving. These lie squarely in the hands of how organizations communicate with and to their donors. The solution to this attrition issue isn’t getting new donors. Quite the contrary. Getting new donors is:Expensive: Raising $1 costs anywhere from $.25 to $1.50.Inefficient: It has a very low ROI ($1).*A short-term solution: Only 23% of first-time donors ever give a second gift.That seems like an awful lot of work to nearly break even or incur a slight loss each year. On the other hand, it is worth looking at how to grow and retain the 64% of loyal donors who have been supporting you over multiple years. After all, fundraising costs to raise $1 from renewals are very low ($.20 to $.25), and these donors offer the highest ROI ($4).*First, identify your donors’ behaviors.What are the past giving levels of your donors’ gifts? By comparing gifts over the past few years within levels such as $1 to $499, $500 to $999, $1,000 to $2,499, and so forth, you’ll be able to see where you’ve had the greatest growth and losses. What is your own donor retention rate, both generally and for first-time donors? What is the average gift rate for each of the years you are comparing? Knowing these data points can ground how you solicit your donors in a way that will encourage growth. For example, you may want to focus on donors within a certain gift range to tailor higher asks. You might also segment a group of lapsed donors or higher-level donors and personalize outreach to them by phone, mail, and in-person communications.Second, understand who your donors are.Which donors have given for multiple years? Who previously supported you but has lapsed? Identify the top 50 to 100 of your longest donors, your largest donors over their lifetime, and newest donors (with a particular eye to those who made large first-time gifts) last year and this year. If you have the resources, it’s helpful to run capacity screening of these three groups to understand where there is greater gift potential. In starting or expanding your major gifts program, these are the donors who will comprise your major gift pipeline. They rarely bounce around from organization to organization. Your next major gift will likely come from one of these donors who has capacity and has supported you for a long time (and not giving at particularly high levels) and may also have been a volunteer. It’s important to get to know this group to understand what motivates their giving and interest in your organization.Third, consider how you communicate with your donors.These current and lapsed donors already know you and are more likely to give more generously if you ask and demonstrate your impact. If we think back to Penelope Burk’s survey results, two of the three top reasons donors stop giving are tied to an organization’s impact and effectiveness. More than ever, donors want to understand how their gift is making a difference in your work. They are giving through you to address a societal need that has meaning for them. Is their gift helping you make a difference? Bring them closer to your work by sharing a personal story of a beneficiary, a measurable accomplishment, or a plan to solve a seemingly intractable problem. As you qualify the major gift potential for those top 50 to100 donors you identified earlier, your ultimate goal is to build meaningful relationships so it naturally leads to sustained and increased support. Get to know their motivations, interests, and philanthropic goals. Use this information to lead your discussions about investments in your work. Remember, it’s not about you.Tied closely with programmatic impact is how effectively your organization operates through costs for program delivery and administration. You don’t necessarily want to skimp on administrative expenses to seem “lean and mean” when it compromises—and even hinders—your ability to scale, deepen, or improve the quality of your work. Without unrestricted operating support, which includes enough funding for your fundraising efforts and staff, you can’t deliver and grow the services of your organization. Build that message about capacity into your donor outreach. Do your donors come away with a strong understanding of what you do, your plans for the future, and why their continued support (unrestricted and restricted) is important?Finally, using the green grass analogy, after you’ve watered and fed your grass with your current donors, it’s still important to plant seeds for the next pipeline of donors. These aren’t the names you rent from mail houses. They can be, but as you saw from an earlier statistic, that’s not a cost-effective solution in the long run. The potential new donors I’m suggesting are people who self-identify in some way. Perhaps you find them through a sign-up on your website or a visitor book if prospective donors can visit your facilities. They can and should also be from the networks of your board and other volunteer leaders. Adding even 10 new names a month can yield up to 120 new donors—if you communicate with and engage them through a relationship model as described above.How can you make the grass you’re standing on greener? By grounding your fundraising approaches on a good understanding of your donors’ giving patterns and interests, creating strategic communications that invite donors into your work, and planting seeds for new supporters in the future. This will strengthen all of your fundraising—annual fund, major gifts, planned giving, and events—and create opportunities for donors to partner with you in bigger and better ways.*From the 2013 DMA’s Response Rate ReportMake this December your best year-end fundraising season ever with Network for Good’s smarter fundraising software, built just for nonprofits. Reach more donors, raise more money, and retain more supporters this year with easy-to-use tools and step-by-step coaching. We have everything you need for a bigger, better campaign, all under one roof. Find out more by speaking with one of our expert fundraising consultants.last_img read more

Maternal Morbidities in the Journal of Population, Health and Nutrition

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on July 5, 2012June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The June issue of the Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition published by our colleagues at icddr,b focuses on the neglected issue of maternal morbidities.Introducing the issue, Mary Ellen Stanton and Neal Brandes of USAID write:This series of papers presents, for the first time in two geographic areas, a comprehensive snapshot of the short- and long-term consequences of acute maternal morbidity. The icddr,b surveillance site in Matlab, Bangladesh, has a unique set of records of the reproductive health of individual women that provide data accumulated for decades. This was selected as an ideal site to draw upon the database to examine retrospectively long-term and prospectively selected short-term consequences of maternal ill-health. This is the first attempt to obtain greater precision on the consequences of maternal ill-health, using a robust methodology and an extensive dataset, with added qualitative studies and postpartum physical examinations of women following childbirth. In addition, we have included a study that provides contrasting and additional information from Action Research and Training for Health in rural Rajasthan, India.In an editorial, Marge Koblinsky et al. note how little we currently know about maternal morbidities:While the estimates of maternal mortality and its consequences are built on relatively limited data, women who suffer from direct obstetric complications that kill—obstructed or prolonged labour, puerperal sepsis, septic abortion, severe pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, and postpartum haemorrhage—are estimated to be far higher in number yet less well-documented. The global estimates range from 15% of pregnant women suffering from complications—about 20 million women annually—to 1-2% in resource-poor settings when the definition is restricted to the most severe morbidities.Even less is known about the numbers and description of the consequences women may suffer as a result of pregnancy and childbirth and the life threatening obstetric complications. These consequences—maternal morbidities or disabilities—are estimated to affect 15-20 million women worldwide each year.The other papers published in the issue explore:the types and severities of maternal morbidities in Matlab and Chandpur, Bangladesh;social, economic, and cultural factors associated with maternal morbidities;perceptions and consequences of cesarean births;psychological well-being during pregnancy;physical and emotional violence against women with maternal disabilities;the impact of maternal morbidities on child development;the economic cost of maternal morbidities;community-based methods for understanding maternal morbidities; andthe physical, economic, and psychological consequences of morbidities in the first year postpartum.Share this:last_img read more

Hiding in Plain Sight: The Importance of Respectful Maternity Care

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Share this: Posted on April 3, 2013March 13, 2017By: Kathleen McDonald, Senior Program Manager, Maternal Health Task Force, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The final plenary of the Global Maternal Health Conference 2013 (GMHC2013) in Arusha, Tanzania struck a nerve. The expert panel presented evidence of disrespect and abuse in maternity wards from all over the world. The audience was captivated and moved but not shocked. From Rwanda to the Netherlands, everyone had a story.Many had witnessed signs of undignified maternity care, yet it had not been named. It had been pushed aside as a cultural norm, or considered as an outcome of a constrained health system. Disrespect and abuse is practiced when laboring mothers are admonished or beaten in a moment of acute vulnerability for having too many children, for having children too soon, for having HIV, or for simply crying out in pain. It manifests itself structurally when an overburdened midwife tries desperately to accommodate an overflowing delivery room, when a mother is abandoned by skilled personnel to deliver on a bare labor ward floor, and when she is handcuffed to a bed when she cannot afford to pay hospital fees.Disrespect and abuse during childbirth is not a new phenomenon. Evidence of poor patient-provider interactions have been documented for decades in North America, Europe, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and Latin America. Maltreatment discourages women from delivering in health institutions, where life-saving treatment for complications in pregnancy and childbirth is available. Often referred to as the ‘moment of truth,’ the quality of the interaction between the healthcare provider and the patient is closely linked with women’s utilization of skilled birth attendance and, ultimately, maternal and newborn health outcomes. However, due to the already overstretched global health agenda, it is easy to overlook the importance of this critical relationship in maternal health programs and policies.The GMHC2013 afforded an opportunity for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers not only to share evidence, interventions, and advocacy for respectful maternity care, but also to challenge all those present to acknowledge this global problem that is hiding in plain sight. If advocates champion that maternal health is women’s health and share the imperative that women’s rights are human rights, then it is vital to support systems, infrastructure, and policies that ensure women’s rights extend to the delivery room.Over the next few weeks, the MHTF will host a series of guest blogs on respectful maternity care that will continue where we left off in Arusha. Posts will explore questions such as: What are programs and policies that are advocating for women’s dignity during childbirth?  Should respectful maternity care be considered a component of quality care?  What are the economic and human rights implications? How can communities become involved? How is disrespect and abuse present in rural and urban settings? In the private and public sectors?  In rich countries and poor countries?We invite you to share your story. Please submit your blog post to Sarah Blake sblake@maternalhealthtaskforce.orglast_img read more

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