Survival course

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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In the end, the NFL cartel is what matters most

first_imgNew England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (12) talks to his team in the huddle during the second half of an NFL football game Sunday, Dec. 21, 2014, in East Rutherford, N.J. (AP Photo/Bill Kostroun)Tom Brady is on his own, cast off by an owner who figured out that being in the club that practically prints money is a lot more important than being loyal to one of his employees.Robert Kraft could have stood by his quarterback, and stood up for the integrity of his franchise. In the embrace of his fellow owners in San Francisco, though, he decided that being part of the multibillion-dollar cash machine was more important than taking that stand for both Brady and the New England fans who are outraged over the serious penalties for “Deflategate.”That it happened just a bridge away from where Al Davis tormented the league for years was perhaps symbolic. The late owner of the Oakland Raiders surely would have fought to the bitter end, just as he did when the NFL dared to try and stop him from moving his franchise to a more lucrative neighborhood in Los Angeles.To understand why Kraft meekly accepted a $1 million fine and the loss of two draft picks when he had been so vocal previously about his team’s innocence in the whole matter doesn’t exactly require a reading of the tea leaves.This is, after all, the same guy who stood before microphones days before the Super Bowl to angrily read a statement defending his quarterback, coach Bill Belichick, and the purity of the franchise.The same guy who warned that he would demand an apology when the investigation by Ted Wells was complete and it was shown neither Brady nor Belichick knew anything about deflated footballs.“Bill, Tom, and I have had many difficult discussions over the years, and I have never known them to lie to me,” Kraft said then. “That is why I am confident in saying what I just said. And it bothers me greatly that their reputations and integrity, and by association that of our team, has been called into question this past week.”Kraft isn’t calling for an apology anymore. Far from it, after the report by Wells all but labeled Brady a liar for denying he led a scheme to deflate the balls to his liking.Judging by Kraft declining to answer questions Wednesday, he’s also given up _ at least for now _ any public defense of his quarterback. That’s probably a good thing after the Patriots’ previous response to the report included the laughable claim that an equipment assistant used the term “deflator” because he was trying to lose weight, not take.As bad of a year as NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has had, even he could recognize the drivel his good friend’s team was spouting. And while it was not Goodell’s place to tell one of his owners what to do, surely some other owners took Kraft aside and reminded him about the good thing they all have going.Kraft acknowledged as much in declining to appeal the team penalty.“What I’ve learned over the last 21 years is the heart and soul and strength of the NFL,” he said, “is the partnership of 32 teams.”So now you have the two-time cheating Patriots, firmly entrenched as the team that will do anything to win, whether it’s violating league rules by taping the signals of other teams or deflating footballs to suit Brady’s liking.Brady’s reputation is also taking a serious hit. Instead of hosting “Saturday Night Live” he’s being parodied on it. His fans are still his fans, but others may now use the word “cheater” before “four-time Super Bowl winner” when describing him.The players’ association will press ahead with its appeal, because that’s what unions do. Brady’s four-game suspension may be reduced, something Goodell seemed to hint at Wednesday when he said he welcomed Brady offering any new information.Conspiracy theorists will surely suggest that Kraft backed off because he made a backroom deal with Goodell to save the league further embarrassment.But the real truth is probably closer to what Kraft himself hinted at. He is a member of a very successful cartel filled with billionaires who don’t like their dirty laundry aired in public, and particularly don’t like having their gravy train upset in any way.Quarterbacks come and go, even the great ones like Brady.But in the end both Goodell and Kraft understand better than most that there’s only one club as exclusive _ and as profitable _ as the NFL.____Tim Dahlberg is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at tdahlberg(at)ap.org or http://twitter.com/timdahlberglast_img read more

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For Tomlin and the Steelers, the time is now…

first_imgWith their eyes set on Super Bowl 52, the Steelers must first take care of their divisional round opponent, Jan. 14 — Jacksonville, Kansas City, or TennesseeCAMERON HEYWARD (Photo by Courier photographer Brian Cook)STEELERS HEAD COACH MIKE TOMLIN (Photo by Courier photographer Brian Cook)NOBODY HAS FOOTBALL FANS like the City of Pittsburgh, and Courier photographer Ashley Woodson was “Out and About” with our community’s best Steelers fans…STEELERS LB Bud Dupree is sizing up Browns QB DeShone Kizer…AND BUD DUPREE gets his man, as DeShone Kizer is dropped for a loss, in Pittsburgh’s New Year’s Eve win over Cleveland. (Photos by Courier Photographer Thomas Sabol)Like us at https://www.facebook.com/pages/New-Pittsburgh-Courier/143866755628836?ref=hlFollow @NewPghCourier on Twitter  https://twitter.com/NewPghCourierlast_img read more

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Launch goes by the books

first_imgA BOOK launch held on Sunday 8 November at Meadowvale Retirement Village in Pakenham was attended by about nine guests…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

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Nelson Toyota, Northport meet again in WKMBL Final

first_imgJeremy Phelan scored 24 points and Mike Vance added 23 to lead Nelson Toyota.The winners opened a 56-40 lead in the second half before Empire rallied to make the game close. Nelson Toyota led 37-32 at halftime.Chase Rickaby scored 21 while bother Addison added 16 for Empire.Nelson Toyota defeated Kootenay Co-op 75-67 to advance to the semi final round while Empire outlasted DeVitos 104-100.In consolation play, Ryan McKinnon scored a game high 43 points to lead DeVitos past Kootenay Co-op  86-81. Joel DeVito added 18 points for the winners. It will be a rematch of last season in the West Kootenay Men’s Basketball League.Nelson Toyota and Northport, Wash., won their respective divisions to advance to the League Final Monday at Mount Sentinel High School Gymnasium. Nelson Toyota edged Northport in 2018 in a high-scoring affair at Selkirk College in Castlegar.Nelson Toyota edged Empire 75-69 Monday at the LVR Hangar while Northport knocked off Mota Automotive 89-71 in Rossland.last_img read more

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Fears of a dire precedent as Brazil seeks results-based REDD+ payment

first_imgCritics worry that Brazil’s reference level for deforestation and the lack of guarantee that the carbon will stay locked up could set an unsustainable precedent for future payments.The forest reference levels currently used in the proposal are high enough that deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon could double and Brazil would still qualify for “results-based” payments. Almost a decade after it was founded, the Green Climate Fund is ready to start paying tropical countries for emission reductions from REDD+. A proposal from Brazil has been submitted to the Green Climate Fund (GCF) board meeting for payments for 2014 and 2015. But advocates and forest policy experts say the way the emissions-reductions savings are being calculated, and the likely possibility that the reductions will not be permanent, might end up setting a poor precedent for future payouts from REDD+.Scientists agree that reducing deforestation and increasing forest areas play a critical role in keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit). Forests could provide almost a quarter of the cost-effective climate mitigation needed by 2030. However they receive less than 3 percent of climate mitigation funding.“In terms of directing climate finance to forests, we are off by at least an order of magnitude,” Frances Seymour, a renowned forest expert and distinguished senior fellow at the World Resources Institute (WRI), said about REDD+ projects.REDD+ was initially proposed as climate change mitigation mechanism that would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by paying developing countries to keep their forests intact rather than cutting them down. Now the GCF, the multilateral climate fund created under the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), is considering proposals for a pilot program for REDD+ results-based payments at its 22nd  board meeting in South Korea this week.Unlike past REDD+ projects that received funds from the GCF to implement programs, the pilot program, announced in 2017, will pay countries ex-post for results achieved between December 2013 and 2018. The $500 million pilot program will pay $5 per ton of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) and limit each country to 30 percent of the total amount. Proposals are evaluated by a technical board and will be considered on a rolling basis at the GCF board meetings, which are attended by board members and observer NGOs.Choosing the right reference levelSome forest experts have raised concerns about the feasibility based on what they consider clear issues with one of the proposals. In its proposal submitted to the GCF, Brazil says it reduced its emissions in 2014 and 2015 by 1.25 billion tons of CO2e in comparison to the deforestation average from 1996 to 2010. It is requesting payment for 2 percent of that, around 25 million tons of CO2e. The Independent Technical Advisory Panel’s assessment of the proposal recommends paying for 19 million tons. If approved at the GCF rate of $5 per ton of emissions reductions, Brazil would get just over $96 million.But advocates say the 1996-2010 average, the so-called Forest Reference Emission Level (FREL B), represents years in which deforestation in the Amazon was exceptionally high, and doesn’t provide a meaningful comparison.“Under the current reference level, deforestation in Brazil could double and they would still be able to get payments,” said Jutta Kill, a researcher at the World Rainforest Movement and biologist who applies her work to support social movements. “If a different reference level had been chosen that reflects the reality of growing emissions, then Brazil would have had a significantly lower level or no claims at all because emissions are going up.”Not everyone agrees with this assessment.“The FREL of Brazil, recognized by the UNFCCC, is appropriate and scientifically rigorous,” says Daniel Nepstad, president and executive director of the Earth Innovation Institute, who has researched deforestation in Brazil for 30 years. “The risk of claiming otherwise is that it will punish Brazil for its success in lowering deforestation so rapidly through 2012, which created the huge difference between FREL and deforestation today. But this is a measure of Brazil’s success.”Pictorial representation of Brazil’s FREL as submitted to the UNFCCC. FREL (A) refers to the mean annual CO2emissions from the period 1996 to 2005 (1,106,027,616.63tCO2); FR(B) refers to the mean annual CO2emissions from the period 1996 to 2010 (907,959,466.33tCO2). Credit: UNFCCCCurrently, countries can choose their own reference level as long as the technical assessment of the FREL has been finalized by the UNFCCC. Brazil’s case is important in that the FREL for the Amazon biome was the first reference level submitted to the UNFCCC for use in results-based payments.In Brazil, deforestation levels were extremely high from 1996 to 2005, and then dropped substantially. Since 2012, deforestation rates have been creeping up again. Between 2014 and 2015, the years for which Brazil is claiming payments, deforestation in the Amazon increased from 5,012 to 6,207 square kilometers (1,935 to 2,397 square miles), an almost 25 percent increase.“In 2014 and 2015 Brazil had the two worst increases in deforestation since it started to rise again,” said Maria Fernanda Gabara, an anthropologist who works with indigenous communities in Brazil. “It’s really contradictory that they are getting payments for these years.”Keeping the carbon locked upThe Green Climate Fund was set up in 2010 as part of the financial mechanism of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. It has 24 board members, representing an equal number of representatives from developed and developing countries. It seeks to “promote a paradigm shift to low-emission and climate-resilient development.” But some experts are concerned that this mission may be at odds with Brazil’s recent shift in government, and question if the emissions reductions that the GCF is paying for will remain locked up forests.“From a climate perspective, REDD+ can only have a benefit if the carbon is kept sequestered,” Kill said. “There is nothing in the proposal that guarantees to keep the carbon in the trees.”Jair Bolsonaro, the recently elected right-wing president of Brazil, ran on a platform of reducing environmental and legal safeguards for forests. He has signaled his intention to develop the Amazon, which experts say has already led to an increase in deforestation.“The annual rate of deforestation is increasing. Whether [it] stays that way we can’t say for sure,” said Peter May, a professor at the Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro, in an interview. “But last year there was a considerable upswing in deforestation after Bolsonaro got elected.”According to Brazil’s official monitoring system, Deforestation in the Amazon has increased from 4,571 square kilometers (1,765 square miles) in 2012 to almost 8,000 square kilometers (3,090 square miles) in 2018 — the highest in almost a decade.Brazilian Amazon deforestation 2002-2018. Image via Mongabay.One of Bolsonaro’s first moves after taking office in January this year was to move control of indigenous lands and the forest service under jurisdiction of the Ministry of Agriculture, which has been touted as a win for agribusiness.This means there’s a chance that the emissions reductions the GCF would pay for might not be permanent.“Brazil was able to reduce deforestation in the past, but it hasn’t stayed down. Now even though deforestation is on the rise, they will be getting paid,” Thomas Fatheuer, a social scientist with Heinrich Böll Stiftung, a German political foundation focused on green policy, told Mongabay. “It’s like rewarding someone for having quit smoking for a few months, even though they are still smoking today.”Political pressureDespite the problems with the proposal and bad precedent it could set, some believe that political pressures could push the GCF to accept Brazil’s proposal anyway. Bolsonaro has threatened to pull out of the Paris Climate Agreement and recently withdrew his country’s invitation to host COP25, this year’s UNFCCC climate summit, which will instead be held in Chile. Some believe that failure to follow through on environmental pledges like REDD+ payments could provide further fuel to the Bolsonaro administration’s anti-environmental stance.“If the Green Climate Fund and the UNFCCC refuse the proposal from Brazil, that might give Brazil more of excuse to leave the climate agreements,” Federal Rural University’s May said. “So that might act as a push for them to say yes.”Given the pro-development stance of the current government, not being able to fulfill expectations around environmental agreements and mechanisms like REDD+ may become further weaponized by the government.“If we kill [the] GCF contract today,” Nepstad said, “the chance that the new admin will roll back forest conservation policy will grow.”To add to the external political pressure, the GCF board might be feeling the pressure from inside as well. The board came under fire at its meeting last July for failing to approve any of the projects under consideration and disburse funds from the more than $10 billion in pledges it has attracted from countries. The meeting was described as “very difficult” by the chair of the board, Lennart Båge.“They are in a sort of double bind,” Fatheuer said. “REDD+ unfortunately has the perverse implication that by not paying out emissions reductions now, it gives countries like Brazil the justification to say ‘conservation doesn’t work, let’s develop instead.’”Banner image: The tinctorius poison dart frog inhabits the greater Amazon rainforest in Suriname and Northern Brazil. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Sarah Sax is a freelance environmental journalist based in New York City, formerly with Vice News. You can find her on Twitter at @Sarah2theSax.Clarification: This article has been updated to include the the full name of Maria Fernanda GebaraFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this article. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Amazon, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Carbon Finance, climate finance, Environment, Featured, Finance, Forest Carbon, Forest Destruction, Forests, Governance, Rainforests, Redd, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Pedro latest: Liverpool and Man United have NOT made move for Barcelona star

first_img Pedro 1 Barcelona are waiting for Manchester United and Liverpool to make a firm offer for Spanish forward Pedro.As talkSPORT told you this month, the 27-year-old is likely to leave the Nou Camp this summer in search of more regular first-team football.The Premier League seems likely to be the La Masia youth graduate’s next destination and the treble winners are expecting bids from England’s top sides, according to Spanish newspaper El Confidencial.Pedro has a release clause of £21million writted into a new four-year contract he signed with Luis Enrique’s men last month and both United and the Merseysiders are prepared to meet that valuation.Despite scoring 11 goals last term, Pedro has struggled to nail down a consistent spot in Barca’s forward line – which consists of the heralded front three: Lionel Messi, Neymar and Luis Suarez.Pedro, who has won three Champions Leagues at the Catalan club, could have a major say in his next move and is likely to be swayed by regular playing time next season ahead of the 2016 European Championship.last_img read more

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Transfer Talk: Baggies eye Griffiths, Dons want Stewart

first_imgDerek McInnes is looking to delve into the transfer market and is eyeing up a move for former Dundee forward Greg Stewart.Elsewhere it seems Hibs could be losing one of their top assets with Jason Cummings seemingly set to join up with Mark Warburton at Nottingham Forest.And Gary Mackay-Stevens could be on his way out of Celtic as Sheffield United look to lure the winger away from Brendan Rodgers’ treble winners. With Harry Kane’s 90+3 minute equaliser at Hampden, the curtain finally fell on the 2016-17 season.But, as ever clubs, are keen to rebuild as quickly as possible, with European qualifiers and League Cup ties just around the corner.For Celtic it may be about holding on to their stars rather than bringing in others. It seems after his free-kick double against England, Leigh Griffiths has caught the eye of English Premier League clubs, with West Brom and Newcastle reportedly interested in the striker.last_img read more

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Resource roundup: How behavioral economics makes you better at your job

first_imgI speak a lot about the connection between behavioral economics and our work, and after every speech I get asked for reference materials. People also often email me for a list of my writing on the topic. So I thought I’d pull together in one post all the resources I’ve created. Here’s a mini library on understanding how people really think – and adjusting our marketing, communications and fundraising strategies accordingly.Plus, as a bonus, I’m including this hour-long video from the Science of Communication speaker series run by the Communications Network and Spitfire Strategies. In this video, Harvard behavioral economist Sendhil Mullainathan provides a great overview of how his field applies to you. Speaker Series: The Science of Communication Featuring Sendhil Mullainathan from Communications Network on Vimeo.The Mini LibraryThe best place to start are the two ebooks I’ve written on the topic with Mark Rovner and Alia McKee of SeaChange Strategies:Homer Simpson for Nonprofits: The Truth about How People Think and What It Means to Your CauseLisa Simpson for Nonprofits: What Science Can Teach You About Fundraising, Marketing and Making Social ChangeI also wrote a series of blog posts reviewing the latest research on what compels generous behavior and giving. Here are the best of them:How giving makes you happyWhich makes people happier – giving or receiving?The relationship between giving and painHow pledging eases the pain of parting from our moneyThe power of social norms in givingHow do social norms, price & scrutiny affect what people give?The role of personal connections in fundraising successHow the power of one (the singularity effect) prompts givingThe effect of mood on giving – and who we choose to helpWhat happens when you try to making giving less emotionalSea monkeys and the case for tangibilityInterview with the Science of Giving authorsThe time-ask effectNeuromarketing tips for nonprofits from Roger DooleyBrain tricks to sell your causeYour gut is more generous than your brainEnjoy!last_img read more

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