Consistency Of A Mother’s Psychological State Vital To Child Development, New Study Shows

first_imgThe Huffington Post: Developing infants can sense what their mothers are feeling, but in an unusual twist, authors of a new study suggest it isn’t necessarily a woman’s mental state that matters — i.e. whether or not she’s depressed — but rather the consistency of the woman’s psychological state before and after she gives birth.The new study, slated for publication in the December issue of Psychological Science, examines how maternal depression impacts babies’ mental health and motor skills. Researchers from the University of California, Irvine, followed 221 pregnant women through pregnancy and for a year following birth. They split the moms into several groups: women with no depressive symptoms, women with depressive symptoms both before and after pregnancy, and women with no symptoms either before or after pregnancy.The researchers found that what mattered most was consistency. Development was best among babies whose moms experienced either no depressive symptoms, or who were depressed both before and after birth.Read the whole story: The Huffington Postlast_img read more

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Comfort Food Myth: Ice Cream May Not Boost Your Mood

first_imgLiveScience:The idea that eating certain foods make us feel better when we’re down may be a myth, psychologists say.In fact, we may simply feel better after some time has passed, regardless of what food we eat, a new study says.In the study, people were asked to pick foods that they thought would make them feel better if they were in a bad mood, such as chocolate, cookies or ice cream. They were also asked to pick foods that they liked, but that they didn’t think would boost their mood.Read the whole story: LiveScience More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Here’s An Easy Way To Improve Your Writing Immensely

first_imgBusiness Insider Australia: Great writing requires clear thinking. Just ask Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon. “There is no way to write a six-page, narratively structured memo and not have clear thinking,” he has said. Writing, even though you’re most likely a long way removed from your college essay days, remains a key skill for success.Which is what makes new research out of George Mason University relevant to you. Something that you are probably doing every day is making you a much worse writer than you otherwise would be, the findings revealed.What is this simple activity that severely dips your writing skill? Simple, everyday interruptions.Read the whole story: Business Insider Australia More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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BRAIN SCIENCE EXPLAINS THE MOST PRODUCTIVE WAYS TO PROCRASTINATE

first_imgFast Company:Sit down to work on a specific task and you may find your mind veering off on a different track, spiraling down into the black hole of procrastination.“We all experience motivational breakdowns, like eating ice cream in front of the television while exercise and writing were originally on the menu,” writes Piers Steel, psychologist and author of the book The Procrastination Equation in Psychology Today. “There are a couple of misfiring neural regions that are reliably responsible for your procrastination.”Read the whole story: Fast Company More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Art for the Knowing Nose

first_imgThe New York Times:Peter De Cupere’s “Tree Virus” sculpture wasn’t much to look at: a dead, black tree rooted in a craggy white ball suspended over a dirt pit, all of it covered by a plastic igloo. Built on a college campus in the Netherlands in 2008, the whole thing might have been leftover scenery from a Tim Burton film if it weren’t for the outrageous smell.Inside the igloo, a heady mix of peppermint and black pepper saturated the air. It flooded the nose and stung the eyes. Most visitors cried; many ran away. Others seemed to enjoy it, laughing through the tears.…Smell has an unfair advantage over the other senses when it comes to eliciting a response, researchers say. “There is a unique and directly intimate connection between where smell is processed in the brain and where memory is stored,” said Rachel Herz, a psychologist at Brown University and the author of “The Scent of Desire: Discovering Our Enigmatic Sense of Smell.” The olfactory bulb — the bundle of neurons that transmits information from the nose to the brain — is part of the limbic system, which supports emotion, long-term memory and adrenaline flow. “This is where that special characteristic that really distinguishes olfaction comes from.”Read the whole story: The New York Times More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Children Want Factual Stories, Versus Fantasy, More Often Than Adults

first_imgNPR:Childhood is a time for pretend play, imaginary friends and fantastical creatures. Flying ponies reliably beat documentaries with the preschool set.Yet adults are no strangers to fiction. We love movies and novels, poems and plays. We also love television, even when it isn’t preceded by “reality.So, what happens as we make our way from childhood to adulthood? Do we ever reallyoutgrow a childlike predilection for make-believe? Or does our fascination with fiction and fantasy simply find new forms of expression?In a paper published earlier this year, psychologists Jennifer Barnes, Emily Bernstein and Paul Bloom set out to compare children’s and adults’ preferences for fact versus fiction in stories. Their results are surprising — and reveal something important about why we’re so drawn to fiction in the first place.Read the whole story: NPR More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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4 Telltale Signs You’re A Workplace Ambivert

first_imgForbes:Are you an introvert or extrovert? Not so fast, there is a third category. Consider your office mates.…In a 2013 research paper in Psychological Science, Adam Grant of The Wharton School deconstructs the traditional belief that extroverts have a natural advantage in sales. Over a three-month study, Grant discovered that ambiverts produced 32% more revenue than extroverts.Read the whole story: Forbes More of our Members in the Media >last_img

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