News Scan for Dec 03, 2019

first_imgMore illness reported in blackberry-linked hepatitis A outbreakFederal health officials today said 2 more hepatitis A infections have been reported in an outbreak linked to fresh blackberries from Fresh Thymes markets, raising the total to 16. One more state—Missouri—is reporting a case, putting the number of affected states at six.So far, no deaths have been reported, and nine people have been hospitalized for their infections. The most recent illness onset is Nov 15.The epidemiological investigation shows that patients ate conventional blackberries from Fresh Thymes Farmers Market stores in Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and Wisconsin.The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said the traceback investigation suggests that the berries came from a distributor that ships fresh berries to Fresh Thymes markets in 11 states: Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, Minnesota, Nebraska, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.The FDA has urged consumers in the 11 states who bought the blackberries between Sep 9 and Sep 30 to discard them and if they ate them to talk to a health provider about receiving postexposure prophylaxis for hepatitis A.Dec 3 FDA update Dec 2 CDC update Bacteria testing on Tanzanian bushmeat reveal zoonotic threats Tests on bushmeat samples in Tanzania’s Western Serengeti revealed 27 different bacteria groups, some of which included Bacillus, Brucella, Coxiella, which include species that cause anthrax, brucellosis, and Q fever. A research team from Penn State and their collaborators in Africa published their findings yesterday in Scientific Reports.For the study, they collected 56 bushmeat samples from the main large herbivores, including buffalo, zebra, and giraffe, from the Serengeti National Park and surrounding areas.With broad genetic sequencing, they characterized the microbiomes in each sample. The most common phyla (bacteria group) they found were Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Within the phyla, they found DNA signatures of bacteria within the Bacillus, Brucella, and Coxiella genera, all of which are potentially dangerous zoonotic pathogens. They also found a high prevalence of bacteria in the Clostridium genus, which causes diseases such as botulism and tetanus. The microbiomes in samples from wildebeest collected during the dry season contained more than 78% Clostridial species.They concluded that the findings provide a better understanding of microbiomes linked to major food sources in Tanzania and point to a need for more investigations on potential health risks regarding the harvest, trade, and consumption of bushmeat in sub Saharan Africa.Vivek Kapur, PhD, associate director of the Huck Institutes of Life Sciences at Penn State, said in a press release from the university that understanding which bacteria are present is needed to help plan ways to curb outbreaks, and the group’s next objective is to fine-tune the focus on specific pathogens to more accurate gauge the disease threat. “Ultimately, our goal is also to help build capabilities for rapid diagnosis and risk mitigation in the countries of origin to address these risks before they become a problem globally,” he said.Dec 2 Penn State press release Dec 2 Sci Rep abstract Nepal faces growing dengue outbreak linked to increasing temperaturesMore than 14,000 cases of dengue have been diagnosed in Nepal since May, according to an article today in The Guardian. The cases, which include six deaths, represent an unprecedented outbreak tied to warmer temperatures that have made the Himalayan country more hospitable to the mosquitoes that carry the virus.Dengue was first documented in 2004 in Nepal, but until this year only minor outbreaks in the southern part of the country had been recorded. This year, 67 of Nepal’s 77 districts, including those at higher elevation, have reported cases of the viral disease, The Guardian reports, and some officials estimate that the actual number of cases has topped 100,000.”The role of climate change in poor countries where the health system is not robust is very big,” Meghnath Dhimal, chief research officer at the Nepal Health Research Council, told the British newspaper. “There has been a rapid geographical expansion of dengue, especially from the lowland to the highland.”Experts attribute the outbreak to the climate crisis, an extended rainy season, and rapid urbanization. Dec 3 Guardian articlelast_img read more

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Pro bono saved this charity £10,000 — That’s three people it has KEPT OUT OF jail

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Harris re-joins CBRE

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OPINION: Future of Education Is Here

first_img Oct 15, 2020 Oct 16, 2020 The world has not planned well for the future. At its worst, education has for too long been underprioritised, and at its best, has been viewed as just one among many competing priorities. Before COVID-19, the funding gap for education in low-income and middle-low income countries – many already plagued with extreme poverty, weak infrastructure, armed conflicts, climate-induced disasters and forced displacement – amounted to $148 billion. This funding gap is now estimated to increase by up to one-third. You may be interested in… Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC NEW YORK, Aug 19 2020 (IPS) – There are moments when the world has no choice but to come together. Those moments become historic turning points. This is one of them. We are now faced with the greatest education emergency of our time. Over one billion children are out of school. The COVID-19 pandemic has created an unprecedented crisis of such magnitude and depth that the next generation might neither have the capacity and tools, nor the will, to rebuild – let alone build back better. Oct 16, 2020 COVID-19 has laid bare our collective failure to prioritise education. “The pandemic has exacerbated inequalities and magnified the global learning crisis. The future of an entire generation is at risk,” warned United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres when launching his Policy Brief on Education earlier this month, “The COVID-19 pandemic has created the largest disruption of education systems in history.” More deaths from COVID-19 recorded in CARICOM countries,… CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak St. Lucia records more cases of COVID Oct 15, 2020 Read more at: InterPress Service Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… The number of out-of-school children who may never set foot in a school again is now rapidly escalating. An estimated 30 million children and youth are of immediate concern, according to UNESCO’s assessment. In a letter to the international community, UN Special Envoy for Global Education and Chair of the Education Cannot Wait’s High Level Steering Group, the Rt. Hon. Gordon Brown, together with 275 world leaders, politicians, academics and civil society, calls for urgent action to address the global education crisis triggered by COVID-19. Call to Action for CARICOM Education Ministers: COVID-19 and EducationIt is evident, that a critical paradigm shift in educational provision is needed; we need to ensure educational resilience through digital transformation. I take this opportunity as the Minister of Education, Science and Technology, Antigua and Barbuda and Chair of the Council for Human and Social Development (COHSOD) to call…April 16, 2020In “Antigua & Barbuda”Use crisis to propel Region into future – business leaderThe COVID-19 pandemic has catapulted the Region into the future, as far as the jobs landscape was concerned, regional business leader and author, Mr. Wayne Chen, said Wednesday. He was at the time speaking during a three-hour CARICOM Digital Dialogue hosted by the CARICOM Girls ICT Partnership. It was held…May 28, 2020In “Agriculture”St. Lucia: Considerations for phased school reopeningIn an effort to respond to and prepare for COVID-19, Saint Lucia implemented a number of control measures. Some of these measures included movement restrictions, closure of businesses, travel restrictions, the 24 hour shut down, the institution of curfews and from very early, the closure of schools.Saint Lucia, like many…May 25, 2020In “General”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

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BP Plans New Investments in Alaska

first_imgBP announced it is planning to add $1 billion in new investment and two drilling rigs to its Alaska North Slope fields over the next five years due to changes in the state’s oil tax policy signed into law this month by Gov. Sean Parnell.These plans call for an increase in drilling and well-work activity, the upgrading of existing facilities and the addition of up to 200 new jobs in the state, giving a boost to both the company’s operations and the state’s economy.In addition, BP has successfully secured support from the other working interest owners at Prudhoe Bay to begin evaluating an additional $3 billion worth of new development projects. These projects, located in the west end of the Greater Prudhoe Bay Area, could continue for nearly 10 years, further increasing the state’s oil production and providing additional jobs.“With this new tax law, the Alaska legislature and Governor Parnell have taken an important step toward improving Alaska’s long-term economic future,” said BP Alaska Region President Janet Weiss. “Our announcement today should make abundantly clear that BP is committed to being a part of that future and to continuing to extend the life of North America’s largest oil field.”BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. will issue a request for proposals (RFPs) beginning this summer for the two additional rigs in Prudhoe Bay. The first drilling rig is expected to be in place by 2015 and the second in 2016. This will increase BP’s rig fleet in Alaska to nine.Meanwhile, BP expects to increase well work as soon as the fourth quarter of 2013, a move that should improve the performance of existing wells at the Prudhoe Bay and Milne Point fields.The additional development opportunities being evaluated by working interest owners are in the west end of Prudhoe Bay and include: expansion and de-bottlenecking of existing Prudhoe Bay facilities, constructing a new drilling pad, and expansions of existing pads, including the drilling of more than 110 new wells. The appraisal phase will take 2-3 years and will include engineering work and securing regulatory approvals for multiple development projects.“Now that an improved tax structure is in place, oil and gas projects can once again move forward, keeping Alaska competitive in the midst of America’s recent energy renaissance,” Weiss said.BP is also working with other companies and the state of Alaska to commercialize Alaska North Slope natural gas as part of a joint concept selection group focused on a South Central Alaska LNG project.“We believe it is the right time to focus on how we move this project forward,” Weiss said.[mappress]LNG World News Staff, June 05, 2013; Image: BPlast_img read more

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Gazprom to push LNG use in Bolivia

first_imgGazprom on Friday signed an agreement with the Bolivian ministry of hydrocarbons and energy and YPFB on broadening cooperation including the advocation of LNG use. The agreement was signed by Gazprom’s head Alexey Miller with Luis Alberto Sanchez Fernandez, Bolivian minister of hydrocarbons and energy, and Guillermo Acha Morales, president of Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales Bolivianos (YPFB), Gazprom said in its statement.The deal to advocate the use of LNG in Bolivia follows a memorandum of understanding signed in February this year when parties agreed to implement projects aimed at using natural gas as fuel in passenger, freight and river transportation in Bolivia, as well as for autonomous supply purposes.The cooperation additionally entails joint development of new projects for hydrocarbon exploration, production, and transportation in Bolivia.The parties plan to update the plans for Bolivian gas industry development until 2040.Gazprom EP International’s managing director Andrey Fick signed a separate agreement with YPFB’s president Acha Morales to explore the La Ceiba, Madidi, and Vitiacua blocks, with retrieved geological and geophysical materials to be used for feasibility studies.last_img read more

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LoveFilm acquisition, steel demerger, fencing sponsorship and shoe sale

first_img Sole practitioners: Manchester firm Heatons advised Jones Bootmaker on its £40m sale to Dutch retail group Macintosh, advised by Midlands firm Browne Jacobson. Discovery channel: London and south-east firm Penningtons advised property investment company Fourteen Ninety Two on the £107m refinancing of 17 Columbus Courtyard, Canary Wharf, London. Lenders MetLife, Duet and The Partners Group were advised by magic circle firm Clifford Chance, US firm Paul Hastings, and City firm Macfarlanes respectively. Cut above: Sports firm Couchmans advised insurer Beazley on a £1m five-year sponsorship deal with the British Fencing Association, advised by London firm Russell-Cooke. Swiss role: Hogan Lovells advised Barclays and Lloyds TSB on financing non-life insurance company buy-out firm ­Catalina’s acquisition of Swiss-based reinsurer Glacier Re, for an undisclosed sum. Magic circle firm Allen & Overy advised Catalina. Stainless deal: Magic circle firm Linklaters advised steel giant ArcelorMittal on the €3.24bn (£2.77bn) demerger of its stainless and speciality steels businesses into a spin-off company. In the picture: City firm Hogan Lovells advised internet retailer ­Amazon on acquiring £200m worth of shares in film rental company LoveFilm, giving it a majority stake. City firm Stephenson Harwood advised LoveFilm. Indian tie-up: Clifford Chance, alongside Indian law firms AZB & Partners and JSA, advised healthcare and medical products supplier Bayer HealthCare on a joint venture agreement with Indian pharmaceutical company Cadila Healthcare.last_img read more

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Honouring the legend of Darrow

first_imgThe American lawyer Clarence Darrow (pictured) did not come to the annual wreath-tossing in his honour last week. But then he hasn’t appeared since his death in 1938. Darrow, never a believer in Spiritualism, said that if he ever did return it would be in Jackson Park, Chicago, on the anniversary of his death. And every year on 13 March, now more in hope than expectation, lawyers assemble to give one-minute speeches at the park bridge, throw a wreath, and then retreat to the warmth for coffee and a proper lecture on a subject which would be dear to the great man’s heart. Darrow’s cases represent America’s golden age of criminal advocacy. He began his career as a corporate lawyer, moving into labour law, defending members of the unions charged in the Haymarket riots in Chicago in 1886, and in 1894 Eugene Debs, the anarchist who ran five times for the presidency. Then came his defence of ‘Big Bill’ Haywood, leader of the Industrial Workers of the World, accused in 1907 of the assassination of a former governor of Idaho. After a little localised trouble defending the McNamara brothers, and then himself when he was accused of bribery – the jury disagreed and he undertook not to practise again in California – he moved into criminal defence work full-time. In 1924 came the Leopold and Loeb trial, perhaps the first of the so-called trials of the century. The boys kidnapped and killed a 14-year-old in Chicago and Darrow saved them from the electric chair. It was made into the film Rope. Next year came the Tennessee ‘Scopes Monkey Trial’ when the defendant was charged with teaching the theory of evolution in contradiction of the Bible. In Detroit in 1926 when Dr Ossian Sweet was charged with shooting a white man, Darrow obtained an acquittal, telling an all-white jury, ‘I insist that there is nothing but prejudice in this case; that if it was reversed and 11 white men had shot and killed a black while protecting their home and their lives against a mob of blacks, nobody would have dreamed of having them indicted. They would have been given medals instead….’ I wonder how many of today’s lawyers have even heard of Darrow’s English contemporary the great defender Edward Marshall Hall. Let alone go out on a cold March morning to Regent’s Park to hold a wreath-tossing in his honour. James Morton is a writer and former criminal defence solicitorlast_img read more

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The unspeakable truth

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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John Good on the move

first_imgThe company says it has chosen to move to the new hub to increase efficiencies for its clients whilst capitalising on the huge opportunities for the company to further develop its ship agency and freight forwarding activities in London and the South East of England.www.johngood.co.uklast_img

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