Last Word

first_imgThe agency estimates that about 10% of its calls are for non-emergencies, and that this campaign has cut that in half. “The bottom line is, we’ve seen a decrease in using ambulances as a taxi service for non medical/non-emergency calls,” says Lake Sumter EMS Executive Director Jim Judge. “The program was also a big morale booster to our staff, who were tired of providing a taxi service.” ED NURSE HELPS REVIVE AMBULANCE EQUIPMENTThree years ago, St. Louis (Mo.) Fire Department Chief of Paramedics Monroe Yancie reached out to Helen Sandkuhl, an emergency room nurse at St. Louis University Hospital, about his department’s need for new EKGs units in its ambulances. Jennison says the tampering was able to continue for so long because the agency tried to deal with it internally and because of a longstanding problem with drug abuse by the service’s personnel coupled with the sheer availability of the drug. “The problem here is that fentanyl is supplied in such a large amount in a reusable bottle,” says Jennison. “It comes 900 micrograms in a bottle, and patients usually only require 240 micrograms. It’s also one use annually, so you throw it away after using it. It’s easy to pop in your pocket and take it home.” A HEALTHY CHANGEWhen he’s not attending medical school classes, EMT-B Mitchell Li works for Cataldo/Atlantic Ambulance in Boston. When he read that cardiac issues cause more than 50% of EMS provider deaths, he decided to do something about it, and the “Don’t Be Your Next Patient” program was born. Three cheers to Sandkuhl for stepping over the EMS/hospital divide to improve life for St. Louis paramedics and their patients’ care. Outfitting the 13 ambulances and training personnel was estimated at about $325,000, but Sandkuhl jumped at the chance to help. She started searching for donors, but none came forward. Li says the most exciting part is getting people involved in a culture change. “If we can make multi-grain bagels not unusual,” it will be a good thing. “EMS works steady, and the equipment takes a beating. The EKGs are eight to nine years old and on their last legs,” says Sandkuhl. EMSPA spokesperson and NSWAS paramedic Grant Jennison is concerned that paramedics like himself may have unwittingly put patients at risk by administering inappropriate and possibly contaminated fluids. Those affected have been contacted and advised to get tested. FLA PSA REDUCES 9-1-1 MISUSEA little public education has gone a long way in Lake Sumter, Fla., where a “Know When to Call 9-1-1” campaign has dramatically reduced ambulance-as-taxi-service calls. Aside from taking aim at non-emergent calls, it also focuses on not delaying calling for help and getting EMS assistance in a true emergency, and provides alternate numbers for people to call for non-emergencies. Director Rob White says the company supports the project. “We’re a family-owned company and understand the health issues facing EMS.” The company told its vending machine supplier, “If you want us to keep your machine, you have to stock it with healthier products.” EMSPA is calling for all of the agency’s drug kits to be replaced with tamper-proof bottles. Jennison says they haven’t acquiesced but have rather distributed an internal document telling paramedics how to tell if a bottle has been tampered with. According to a NSWAS statement, the service is in talks with manufacturers to make the bottles tamper-proof. It also says fentanyl is being securely stored and checked twice a day. “[NSWAS] believes that the steps already taken have alleviated risk of contamination to the public,” it goes on to say. But Jennison isn’t so sure, and until those bottles are replaced, neither are we. JEMS Launched in January 2007, the campaign consists of a billboard along Highway 27 just south of Leesburg, Fla., flyers distributed at community events, presentations, advertising in local magazines and a special Web site. It’s had such a positive response that it’s been featured in many media outlets and adopted by other communities. View the campaign at www.whentocall911.com. SHAM DRUG SHAMEThree New South Wales (Australia) Ambulance Service (NSWAS) paramedics, including one who has reportedly admitted to stealing fentanyl, have been taken off duty pending internal investigation of drug tampering allegations. Paramedics at the service reported to the Emergency Medical Services Protection Agency (EMSPA) that colleagues may have been using the powerful painkiller and giving patients an unknown replacement fluid (likely saline) for up to 18 months–and that the agency’s leadership knew about it. Then, Kelly Chase, with the St. Louis Blues Alumni Association and owner of a junior hockey league team, contacted Sandkuhl to propose donating proceeds from the alumni and Bandits games played on Nov. 20. She agreed, and $50,000 was raised that day. The publicity also resulted in other donors coming forward. Yancie says, “Helen was the first one to take the bull by the horns and really try to help us out.” He enlisted the help of fellow EMTs and company management. On their own time, EMTs approached local businesses to help them make life in EMS a bit healthier. According to John Robert Gardner, EMT-B, they asked restaurants that serve healthy food to give EMS personnel discounts or preferential service–head-of-the-line privileges, for instance. They’ve gotten discounts from local fitness centers as well. In return, participating businesses get certificates commending them for “helping to take care of their community by taking care of the EMS that works there.”last_img read more

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Even Before Pandemic Struck, More U.S. Adults Were Uninsured

first_imgThe CDC report found that adults who were uninsured last year because coverage was not affordable were more likely to be in poor health, a group that’s at higher risk of serious complications from COVID-19. Uninsured women were more likely to cite affordability problems than men, and those 50 and older were also more likely than the group under 30 to report a financial hardship. The increase in the uninsured rate came even as the economy was chugging along in an extended period of low unemployment. The findings suggest that even during good times, the U.S. was losing ground on coverage gains from the Obama-era health care overhaul. The new numbers come from the CDC’s National Health Interview Survey, which is considered one of the government’s most authoritative reports. Lack of affordable coverage was the top reason given for being uninsured, cited by nearly 3 out of 4 surveyed. Patient Advocacy and Understanding Ambulance Insurance BillingTelehealth Expansion Eyed Beyond PandemicCOVID-19’s Impact on EMS Documentation Requirements WASHINGTON (AP) – About 2.5 million more working-age Americans were uninsured last year, even before the coronavirus pandemic struck, according to a government report issued Wednesday. Health insurance coverage has eroded under President Donald Trump, who is still trying to overturn the Affordable Care Act, or “Obamacare.” By contrast, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden wants to expand the ACA and add a new public plan in a push to eventually cover all Americans. More recent estimates suggest there are 5 million to 10 million newly uninsured. In the midst of a pandemic, that would still represent a sharp increase in the number of people who may face problems getting medical attention. Uninsured people often postpone going to see a doctor until their symptoms become severe. The Trump administration has resisted calls to fully open the ACA insurance markets during the ongoing public health emergency. The study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 14.5% of adults ages 18 to 64 were uninsured in 2019, a statistically significant increase from 2018, when 13.3% lacked coverage. The situation has only worsened since COVID-19 began to spread in the U.S. early this year, forcing a sudden economic shutdown that left millions out of work. How much worse is not yet known, because government surveys like the CDC’s have a significant lag time. In 2018, 26.3 million adults ages 18 to 64 were uninsured. Last year, that number rose to 28.8 million, CDC said. FILE – In this March 6, 2020, file photo, the headquarters for Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. About 2.5 million more working-age Americans were uninsured last year, even before the coronavirus pandemic struck. That’s according to a study issued Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (AP Photo/ Ron Harris, File) Initial estimates from private experts that suggested more than 25 million people could have become uninsured due to pandemic job losses appear to have been too high. Related Experts say there could be several reasons why coverage losses due to the pandemic have not been as deep as initial feared, including people switching to a spouse’s plan and more people qualifying for Medicaid or for an ACA “special enrollment period.”last_img read more

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Food Services opens new catering facility

first_imgNotre Dame Food Services introduced a new facility, the Center for Culinary Excellence (CCE), with a grand opening on Nov. 11. This facility was formerly known as the Food Services Support Facility, and it now prepares food for Notre Dame’s cafés, dining halls and catered events.The CCE houses a new catering kitchen, bake shop and Grab-n-Go program. The relocation of catering at North Dining Hall to the CCE opens up the opportunity for possible renovations in North Dining Hall.“Our goal is to improve student dining as well as our culinary experience on campus,” John Glon, manager of the CCE, said. “We have our own kitchen here, which we’ve built so that the staff at North Dining Hall can fully concentrate on the students.”The CCE achieves the goal of separating the student dining experience from the catering experience.“Chris Abayasinghe, director of Food Services, has put a big emphasis on separating our student dining staff from our catering staff to use those two as separate entities,” Glon said.Glon said in the past, dorms were built closer to North Dining Hall but eventually started to shift south.“Back in the 90s, South Dining Hall did mostly catering, and North Dining Hall did most of student dining due to location,” he said.Glon said the rapid growth in catering production at Notre Dame has called for efforts to balance both the student dining experience with catering.“Really, the biggest driving reason [for the CCE] was to take care of our customers better and take both catering and student dining with better respect to culinary excellence,” Glon said.Food Services also takes pride in its efforts for sustainability, and with the establishment of the CCE, food supplies will be delivered directly to campus units instead of being delivered to a central storage area first, Glon said.Throughout all these changes, Glon said his favorite part of the job and the overall experience has been the challenges.“The most rewarding part is when we exceed the expectations of the students and the customers, and we achieve what we are trying to do,” Glon said.Tags: CCE, center for culinary excellence, food services support facility, glon, john glon, North Dining Hall, South Dining Halllast_img read more

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Introducing the Urban Cycling Hall of Fame, Nominate your local Hero

first_imgIt’s national bike month, and bike to work week, which is a good time to introduce the Urban Cycling Hall of Fame. In a joint effort between Chrome Industries and Echos Communications, the Urban Cycling HOF aims to recognize the riders, makers, and organizers who have developed urban cycling into what it is today.Read on for more on the selection committee, and how to nominate a rider. All of the above members of the selection committee are deep into cycling culture and have contributed significantly to the urban cycling movement. For more on each committee member, check out the Urban Hall of Fame site. You can also use the same link to nominate someone or a rider until July 15th for the 2013 class of inductees.In addtion, Chrome ONE, their 1976 GMC motor home will be making the rounds in search of cycling artifacts and videos to add to the UCHOF. Their schedule is currently wide open, so if you want the Mobile HOF to come to your city let them know. Make sure to follow the UCHOF on Twitter and Instagram as well with the handle, @UrbanCyclingHOF.last_img read more

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Shawnee Mission girls lax team holding info sessions, looking for new players

first_imgThe Shawnee Mission girls lacrosse team celebrates with its title after defeating St. Teresa’s Academy.The girls lacrosse team made up of students from Shawnee Mission high schools and area private schools that took last year’s metro title is looking for fresh blood.Shawnee Mission Girls Lacrosse, a club team, is hosting two informational sessions for prospective players in the coming weeks. Students interested in the clubs can attend either session. The sessions will be from 6:30-8 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 28 and Tuesday, Feb. 2 at Leawood Presbyterian Church, 2715 W. 83rd Street.Online registration is available through the club’s website here.Team leaders stress that no previous lacrosse experience is necessary to join the clubs. Junior varsity and varsity squads will practice and compete against other teams between March 1 and May 15.The club will host two preseason demonstration and practice sessions at Lakeland Community Church, 913 NE Colburn Road in Lee’s Summit. Those sessions will be 7-9 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 18 and Thursday, Feb. 25.last_img read more

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Best Bets for the Weekend: Father’s Day celebrations, World Cup, and camping out

first_imgJoin the Father-Daughter workshops with JCCC Cosmetology. Photo credit: JCCCTonight from 4-8 Johnson County Community College’s Cosmetology Department is hosting a father-daughter hairstyling and beauty workshop. Cosmetology and Esthetic students will provide step-by-step training for basic hairstyles, nail polishing, make-up and skin care. This event is free, no appointment necessary and open to all ages. Attendees can enter to win a gift basket, salon discounts and other great prizes.Today also marks the start of the World Cup. Maloney’s, will be hosting watch parties and opening early for some games. Call ahead or check out their door signs for more info.On Friday night watch (arguably) the greatest movie of all time, The Muppet Movie, in one of two locations:1) at Electric Park in Lenexa. Lawn games begin at 7:30, movie starts at dusk.2) In Santa Fe Commons in downtown Overland Park. . Come early to rock out with the fantastic Ernest James Zydeco Band, which starts at 7.See the Doo-Dads at the Lenexa Public Market on Saturday. Photo credit: The Doo-DadsThe Lenexa Public Market celebrates dads two ways on Saturday, with an art project for “Superhero Dads” and an afternoon concert and food party with the Doo-Dads.This Saturday join The Great American Campout and sleep under the stars in one of the most beautiful parks in Johnson County. Campers receive passes for a Pedal Boat Rental, admission to the Beach, and tickets to The Little Mermaid at The Theatre in the Park. The Earnest James zydeco band will play at Santa Fe Park on Friday.Dad and everyone else in the family have lots to choose from this weekend:last_img read more

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Mission councilmember Kristin Inman runs for re-election to Ward 3 seat

first_imgMission councilmember Kristin Inman earlier this week filed to run for re-election. Photo courtesy of Kristin InmanMission councilmember Kristin Inman is running for re-election this November. Inman was first elected in 2016 to the Ward 3 seat for a four-year term in office. At this time, the incumbent runs unopposed.If re-elected, Inman hopes to continue the momentum of “great successes” in Mission.“I really enjoyed my last three-and-a-half years on the council and I would like to be able to represent Ward 3 for the next four years,” she said.The city has the opportunity to focus on asset management on future community improvement projects on streets, sidewalks, structures, stormwater and other infrastructure, Inman said. For example, she hopes the city can combat Rock Creek channel erosion issues by requesting stormwater funding assistance from Johnson County.“We need to go ahead and continue working with the master plan that was presented to the council in 2016 for park and recreation,” Inman added, citing residents’ priorities for improvements on playground equipment, trails, the community center and aquatic center.Inman currently leads her fellow councilmembers as chair of the city’s community development committee. In her past life, Inman served as treasurer of Cheshire Court Homes Association.Inman said she hopes to look at business development opportunities that would also benefit more vulnerable members of the community.“There’s always funding issues on getting some of the main infrastructure items done, because of course those are very expensive,” Inman said. “But other challenges — or opportunities, I think — would be, as we look at incentives for development to come into the Mission community, if there’s a multi-family aspect to that type of development, I would like to see some incorporation of affordable housing.“If we’re going to be giving tax incentives away, we should probably ask for something for members that are a little bit more vulnerable in the community.”Other key issues in Inman’s mind as the city moves forward include teardown-rebuild of homes as well as sustainability in city planning.An Iowa native, Inman earned a business degree from Iowa State University. She moved to the Kansas City area in 1998 and has lived in Mission twice. After first settling in Mission that year, she lived for a time in Overland Park with her husband, Billy Inman. The couple has lived in Ward 3 since 2013.last_img read more

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Fr. Glenn: Surrendering

first_imgBy Fr. Glenn JonesLikely you’ve noticed that there sure is a lot of surrendering these days … and so unnecessarily (not to mention insincerely), too. Even the comics often ridicule the tendency. One makes an innocent comment on social media or in a speech or even simply in daily conversation, and can be immediately excoriated across the chasm of electronic insulation. Before you know it, the initial commentator is backpedaling as fast as their little fingers can type, almost to apologize for existing.Our human social makeup tends to make most people want to “get along” for the good of the community; after all, such is no doubt a survival mechanism built within us from ancient times—being on good terms with the community for common defense and gathering sustenance. When we people are angry at us, I think our internal mechanism screams “Danger! You’re losing allies and thus mutual assistance and protection!”And yet—especially in our day—criticism is free-flowing and often thoughtless, some critics shame commentators for perfectly reasonable comments or for positions simply because those positions go against what the critic believes or what is then trendy. Very often the critic’s goal is to shame the targeted commentator into abandoning—surrendering—his position publicly in effort to deflect additional criticism, and yet by doing so telegraph to the world that his position was wrong and while reinforcing the critic’s observation. Surrendering so as to not “feel bad” essentially.No one likes criticism—especially the virulently vile criticism so often prevalent on social media. But let us remember that, like blood when we’re injured, a little can look like a lot. Certainly it is only courtesy and graciousness to try not to offend others unnecessarily by unfounded criticism or ad hominem attacks, but neither should we abandon sincerely-held and well-founded principles simply because we receive criticism. In fact, criticism forces one to refine (or rightfully abandon if untenable) his own position. But it is weakness in character to abandon what we consider truth simply to “get along, especially knowing that criticism is pretty much inevitable regardless of one’s position. So, when someone says a negative reaction has gone “viral”, a proper response may be simply be “Yeah … so? Was the criticism actually warranted?”Such is a time when that essential virtue of moral courage becomes even more critical—to hold one’s principles when under challenge. After all, if you can’t defend your principles, why do you hold them in the first place? As cited months ago in this column, the Biblical example of the old man Eleazar’s courage provides a marvelous example. Eleazar, a man of high position, is willing to sacrifice even his life to do the right and the good, refusing to even feign capitulation: And we read: “But making a high resolve, worthy of his years and the dignity of his old age and the gray hairs which he had reached with distinction and his excellent life even from childhood, and moreover according to the holy God-given law, he declared: ‘Such pretense is not worthy of our time of life,’ he said, ‘lest many of the young should suppose that Eleazar in his ninetieth year has gone over to an alien religion, and…I defile and disgrace my old age…Therefore, by manfully giving up my life now, I will show myself worthy of my old age and leave to the young a noble example of how to die a good death willingly and nobly for the revered and holy laws.’”  (2 Maccabees 6:23-28)One might hear: “Well … that’s just a story in a book!” Perhaps. But such events have occurred throughout history: martyrs for faith, defenders of nations in wartime, etc. How pathetic those persons would have been if they had abandoned ship because they were afraid of being disliked … or (gasp!) unpopular! To paraphrase Shakespeare: “A coward dies a thousand deaths. The brave man only once.”Also, in this time of fragmentation elections looming, we hear speculations of possible riots if this or that candidate loses. But consider: if one capitulates under threat today, what will he do tomorrow with those threatening even more emboldened and powerful? After all, many if not most tyrannies came into being, not with an overnight revolution, but by slow but inexorable elimination of opposition. Read of the worst dictators and see that such tactics were their vehicle of attaining power.So … to risk adage overload … as Edmund Burke wrote: “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing” … and, following our theme for today, we might add: “…or for the good person to surrender good principles.”One good, and even wonderful—albeit challenging—surrender, however, is that of surrendering one’s self to God … walking the way Christ has shown us. After all, the whole of Christ’s teaching is to love God and to love our neighbor; what is better than that? Should we surrender those principles, one could hardly call oneself “Christian”. Christ Himself was roundly excoriated, and even condemned for His principles; should His disciples do less? What pitiful soldiers of Christ we would be. So … let us remember St. Paul again: “Therefore take the whole armor of God, that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand. Stand therefore, having girded your loins with truth, and having put on the breastplate of righteousness, and having shod your feet with the equipment of the gospel of peace; besides all these, taking the shield of faith, with which you can quench all the flaming darts of the evil one. And take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God.” (Ephesians 6:13-17) And let us also take courage in Christ’s own word: “Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” (Matthew 5:10)Rev. Glenn Jones is the Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe and former pastor of Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church in Los Alamos.last_img read more

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First May LNG cargo heading for South Hook

first_imgSouth Hook LNG terminal in the United Kingdom is expected to receive its first May cargo from Qatar next week. The 217,000 cbm Al Huwaila LNG carrier is expected to dock at the South Hook jetty on May 1, data from the Milford Haven Port Authority reveals.The first May delivery will come only two days following the last April cargo and it will be the third LNG carrier to dock at the South Hook jety in a period of five days.The South Hook terminal, owned by Qatar Petroleum, ExxonMobil and Total, can process 15.6 million tonnes of LNG a year and is capable of delivering 21 billion cubic metres of gas a year into the UK’s national transmission system.[mappress mapid=”18010″]LNG World News Stafflast_img read more

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Different ways to shorten the skills gap

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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