New study explores mental health impact of U.S. stay-at-home orders during coronavirus pandemic

first_imgShare on Twitter Share Share on Facebook An online survey questioned 500 U.S. adults from 45 states who were between the ages of 20 to 74. Subjects completed a unique 20-item measure of “COVID-19 related experiences and stressors” which included an assessment of perceived impact of the virus. Participants were asked, “To what extent has the situation associated with COVID-19 affected the way you live your life?” Subjects also completed assessments of health anxiety, depression, financial worry, perceived social support, and loneliness.The majority (82%) of respondents reported living in an area with stay-at-home orders currently in place. The quarantine orders had been in place for an average of 5.71 days. Results showed that those under stay-at-home orders showed increased health anxiety, loneliness, and financial worry.As researchers predicted, the extent to which subjects felt their lives had been affected by the coronavirus was correlated with increased health anxiety and financial worry. Surprisingly, the perceived impact of the pandemic was also associated with increased social support and decreased loneliness.The researchers say that this finding suggests that “one potential positive outcome of this pandemic may be an increase in social support seeking or connectedness as individuals try to adjust to changes in daily life.” They express that this falls in line with previous research that suggests that the shared experience of the pandemic may lead to increased “closeness and social cohesion (Courtet et al., 2020).”Level of income was negatively related to health anxiety, financial worry, and loneliness, but positively related to social support. The authors note that low-income individuals may be a group especially at-risk of experiencing negative outcomes during the pandemic and suggest “widespread interventions focused on promoting mental health and well-being (including a sense of connection) among less financially secure individuals.”The researchers address the limited scope of their study as it captured psychological outcomes only at the early stages of the U.S. COVID-19 outbreak. They suggest that future studies delve into long-term outcomes as well as possible maladaptive behaviors that might emerge as a result of the pandemic.While past research suggests that the mental health effects of pandemics tend to decrease with time, the authors suggest this may not be the case with the impact of COVID-19. “Given the relatively high mortality rate associated with COVID-19, the lack of adequate testing in some countries, and the absence of effective pharmaceutical interventions for COVID-19, it remains to be seen whether a similar trajectory will occur with the current pandemic.”The study, “Psychological Outcomes Associated with Stay-at-Home Orders and the Perceived Impact of COVID-19 on Daily Life”, was authored by Matthew T. Tull, Keith A. Edmonds, Kayla Scamaldo, Julia R. Richmond, Jason P. Rose, and Kim L. Gratz. Emailcenter_img Pinterest A recent survey has linked quarantine orders to increased health anxiety, loneliness, and financial worry in the U.S. population. Interestingly, the survey also found that the perceived impact of COVID-19 was associated with greater social support and a lower level of loneliness. The study was published in Psychiatry Research.Given the recent emergence of COVID-19, studies on the psychological impact of the outbreak are minimal. However, early studies from China point to increased anxiety, depression, and stress during China’s late January outbreak.In many countries, unprecedented social distancing measures have been put in place in order to slow the spread of the virus. In the U.S., the majority of states have implemented quarantine orders. Study authors Tull and colleagues express that although these measures are vital for public health, the associated psychological impact is not yet understood. The researchers aimed to assess the impact of quarantine measures as well as the perceived impact of COVID-19 on mental health outcomes in the U.S. population. LinkedInlast_img read more

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Stewardship / Resistance Scan for Sep 24, 2018

first_imgNew platform to detect and track drug-resistant infections in the worksThe office of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced today that the New York State Department of Health (DOH) will partner with ILÚM Health Solutions to develop a research program to detect, track, and manage antibiotic-resistant infections at healthcare facilities across the state.According to a press release from the governor’s office, DOH and ILÚM—a wholly owned subsidiary of Merck & Co.—will work together to develop an infectious disease platform and real-time information service that tracks drug-resistant organisms, patients, and outcomes,  delivers relevant insights to help healthcare providers make better treatments decisions, and connects DOH to state facilities. The collected data will also be used to aid in the development of new diagnostic tools.”Through public-private partnerships and investments in advanced research, New York State is working to help curb the spread of infectious diseases,” Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul said in the press release. “This new partnership will make significant strides in detecting and managing infections, helping to ensure the health and safety of New Yorkers.”Under the terms of the agreement, ILÚM will invest up to $48.6 million in the project over 5 years, and the New York State Life Sciences Initiative will commit $22.4 million. A pilot program at select facilities will be evaluated for efficiency and efficacy before the program is expanded throughout the state.Sep 24 NY governor’s office press release  CTX-M genes found in E coli isolates from US cattle, retail meat samplesA new study by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) researchers has identified and characterized Escherichia coli carrying the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) gene CTX-M in food-producing animals and animal products in the United States. The study was published in the September issue of Microbial Drug Resistance.While CTX-M-producing E coli strains have become increasingly prevalent in hospitals in the United States and around the world and have been identified in bacteria from healthy animals in several countries, there have been fewer reports of CTX-M ESBLs in bacteria from food animals and animal products in the United States. Intestinal carriage of CTX-M–producing bacteria in food-producing animals and contamination of retail meat is a concern because it may contribute to increased incidences of infections with ESBL-producing bacteria in humans.To investigate the presence of CTX-M–carrying E coli in US food animals, the researchers conducted antibiotic susceptibility tests to determine which E coli isolates from cattle, chicken breasts, ground turkey, ground beef, and pork chops collected by the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) from 2011 through 2015 were likely ESBL producers. They then performed whole-genome sequencing on the 18 phenotypically positive ESBL E coli isolates to characterize the resistome, plasmids, and resistance genes in all strains.Their analysis revealed that all of the isolates were resistant to at least three antimicrobial classes and carried various CTX-M genes, including blaCTX-M-1, blaCTX-M-14, blaCTX-M-15, blaCTX-M-27, and blaCTX-M-32. Notably, this is the first report of E coli isolates from the NARMS retail meat program carrying blaCTX-M-14 and blaCTX-M-15, the two most frequently identified CTX-M genes worldwide. In addition, conjugation testing performed on seven of the isolates showed the CTX-M genes could be transferred to other E coli strains.The authors conclude, “While the prevalence of these two successful CTX-M enzymes is low from domestic food animal sources, monitoring will continue to help determine whether this mechanism is becoming more widespread among animal and food strains of E. coli in the United States.”Sep 1 Microb Drug Resist studylast_img read more

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On her Majesty’s cylinder service

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Taiwan’s LNG imports rise in Feb YoY

first_imgTaiwan, the world’s fifth largest liquefied natural gas (LNG) buyer, increased its imports of the chilled fuel by 26 percent in February.Taiwan imported 1.28 million mt of LNG in February, as compared to 1.01 million mt in the same month in the same month last year, according to the data released by the Directorate General of Customs.The country paid about $549 million for LNG imports in February, the data shows.Qatar, the world’s top LNG exporter, remained the dominant supplier of the fuel to Taiwan in the month under review.LNG imports from Qatar reached 376,010 mt, followed by Papua New Guinea that supplied 178,984 mt of the chilled fuel to Taiwan in February.The rest of the LNG imports came from Malaysia, Indonesia, Oman, Australia, Russia, Brunei, Trinidad and Tobago and the U.S., according to the customs data.Taiwan’s LNG imports rose 2.7 percent to 14.97 million mt in 2016.With less reliance on nuclear power and dwindling domestic natural gas resources, Taiwan is expected to increase its LNG imports in the future to drive power sector growth.The country currently imports the chilled fuel via two regasification terminals, located in the central and southern parts of the island.State-owned CPC is also planning to build a third LNG import terminal to serve the northern region near Taipei. LNG World News Stafflast_img read more

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Victorious losers

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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SAL loads super-heavy module

first_imgThe super-heavy unit measured 42 m x 37 m x 36 m and has an overall volume of 54,353 cu m. SAL Heavy Lift accepted the project at short notice, only having two weeks to make all the necessary arrangements. Svenja’s on board equipment had to be modified to complete the job. The traverse had to be rigged and fastened at a certain angle; various grommets needed to be ordered and certified. Svenja used its two on board 1,000-tonne lifting capacity cranes in tandem to lift the module from a barge into the hold. Svenja is now making for Geoje in South Korea, transporting the module with open hatches and an overhang of 20 m.  www.sal-heavylift.comlast_img read more

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Three questions about the International Bar Association

first_imgI am writing this from The Hague in the Netherlands, where I am attending a variety of International Bar Association (IBA) meetings, including one for Bar Leaders. It has led me to reflect on the structure and aims of the IBA, which are not often publicly discussed. I have as a result formulated three questions. You may think that the answers automatically follow from the emphasis given in the lead-up to each – but, no, they are intended to be open questions. By way of background to the first, it was recently reported that an Honorary Life President of the IBA, George Seward, died earlier this year at the age of 101. Many members of the IBA will remember his regular attendance at conferences. You may wonder what this has to do with structure and aims, but he had a major impact on the way that the IBA is now formed. In 1968, he proposed for the first time that the IBA should form a section for individual lawyers, as opposed to just bars. The bar members were initially reluctant, but in due course the Section on Business Law (now the Legal Practice Division) was created, with its first official meeting in 1970. As with other leaders, people interpret his legacy differently. Many say that he ensured the financial viability of the Association with the introduction of individual membership. Others – probably from the bar side – believe that his proposal diluted the identity and meaning of the organisation. The first question is this: is the word ‘bar’ in the IBA’s title appropriate, given that – although it has bars as members – it also has a wide range of individual members over which it has no regulatory control? The second question concerns the balance between bar members and individual members. The introduction of individual membership not only saw to the financial viability of the IBA, but indeed led it to become what can only be called a very rich organisation. Inevitably, the contributors are entitled to a large say. The bars are minor contributors to the wealth, and have a correspondingly sized voice, even sometimes over issues which directly affect the bars. The IBA is trying to address this through its increasingly vocal Bar Issues Commission. The next question is this, then: in an organisation of lawyers which is called a bar association, should the voice of the professional bodies be dependent on their financial contribution or on their importance in the practising life of lawyers? Third, volunteers play a vital role in the output of the IBA. I should know because I am one, having contributed many hours to its work on cross-border legal services and professional principles. All the while, the reserves of the IBA grow in the bank to the extent where it could continue running for a long time even if all financial support were to be cut off tomorrow. From its last big conference in Dubai, for instance, it made a very handsome profit. It is curious that the volunteers who undertake unpaid work for the IBA contribute to the IBA’s sizeable reserves by paying the not insubstantial registration fees for conferences, on which the IBA then holds the profits. Of course, many organisations rely on volunteers, but they are usually hand-to-mouth bodies where income is low. The third question, therefore, is this: should the current structure continue, which is based on unpaid members doing the lion’s share of professional work in a wide array of committees – indeed the members pay for the privilege of doing the work through conference registration – when the IBA now has the resources to employ professional staff to undertake much more policy work (which would free up members to provide the more manageable role of advising and voting on the policies)? We have a stake in the answers, because a body like the IBA may be viewed by important political players in the international arena as representing us all. Its identity, and the quality of the policies it promotes, depend on the correct answers being given. I should end with the usual disclaimers. These are my own thoughts, not those of the organisation where I work (the Council of Bars and Law Societies of Europe, or CCBE). There are two international lawyers’ organisations, the IBA and the UIA (Union Internationale des Avocats), and the CCBE has excellent relations with both, although it is a member of neither. The fact that I am writing about the IBA does not mean that I favour it – or disfavour it – over the UIA, but just that I happen to be in The Hague at an IBA meeting now. And both the IBA and UIA do excellent work in providing networks, holding conferences and producing policies for lawyers. The IBA has endless reviews of its structure. One is just snaking its way to an end now. Is it time for yet another? Jonathan Goldsmith is secretary general of the Council of Bars and Law Societies of Europe, which represents about one million European lawyers through its member bars and law societies. He blogs weekly for the Gazette on European affairslast_img read more

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Promising Young Woman: watch the first trailer now

first_imgThe first trailer has debuted for Promising Young Woman.Due to be released in 2020, the film stars Carey Mulligan alongside Laverne Cox, Bo Burnham, Alison Brie, Connie Britton, Jennifer Coolidge, Max Greenfield, Christopher Mintz-Plasse, Chris Lowell, Adam Brody, Sam Richardson, Molly Shannon and Clancy Brown. Watch the trailer below:Promising Young Woman is directed by Emerald Fennell and produced by Margot Robbie, Tom Ackerley, Josey Mcnamara, Emerald Fennell and Ashley Fox. Everyone said Cassie (Carey Mulligan) was a promising young woman… until a mysterious event abruptly derailed her future. But nothing in Cassie’s life is what it appears to be: she’s wickedly smart, tantalizingly cunning, and she’s living a secret double life by night. Now, an unexpected encounter is about to give Cassie a chance to right the wrongs of the past in this thrilling and wildly entertaining story.last_img read more

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Jazz In The Gardens presents Poetry In The Gardens

first_imgMiami Gardens — Presented by the City of Miami Gardens on Thursday, March 7, Poetry in the Gardens is an exciting addition to the Jazz in the Gardens brand that explores the best in spoken word and poetry.Speak Your ArtThe much-anticipated competition, under the theme Speak Your Art, will provide a forum for spoken word artists to share their creativity to generate meaningful conversation and use their voices to influence positive changes.“Jazz in the Gardens is known for showcasing a wide range of talent to the thousands of patrons who attend the festival annually. Talent can manifest itself in a variety of ways, it is not limited to music,” said Miami Gardens Mayor Oliver Gilbert. “Poetry in the Gardens provides a platform for these artists to bring their gifts and talents to life and I am pleased that Jazz in the Gardens has evolved to provide such an opportunity.”Poets and spoken word artists age 21 and over are encouraged to enter the preliminary competition during the Film Music Art & Culture (FMAC) Conference for a chance to participate in the final contest. Prize money is $10,000 – 1st place, $5000 – 2nd place and $1500 – 3rd place.PRELIMINARY CONTESTThursday, March 7, 2019 ~ 11AM — 2PMFIU Koven‘s Conference CenterFlorida International University Biscayne Bay Campus3000 NE 151st Street, North Miami, FL 33181FINALS CONTESTThursday, March 7, 2018 ~  8:00PMLorna’s Caribbean & American Restaurant19752 NW 27th Avenue • Miami Gardens, FL 33056last_img read more

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Chevron Marine Lubricants Publishes New White Paper – Methanol and Marine…

first_imgChevron Marine Lubricants, a leading lubrication solutions provider for alternatively fueled vessels and one of the largest suppliers of marine lubricants in the world, today has released the first in a series of new white papers focusing on innovations and developments impacting the fast-changing shipping industry.“Methanol and Marine Lubricants in a Lower Sulphur, Lower Emissions Future” explores the use of methanol bunkers, and how Chevron’s Taro® Special cylinder lubricants and DOT.FAST® service play a critical role in the successful operation of M/T Mari Jone and M/T Mari Boyle, two of the world’s first ocean-going methanol dual-fuel ships.The white paper has been produced in consultation with:Vancouver, Canada-based Methanex Corporation, whose Waterfront Shipping subsidiary are co-owners and charterers of the vessels.Private ship manager and investment group Marinvest Shipping AB, who are also co-owners of the vessels.MAN Diesel & Turbo who produced the ME-LGI methanol dual-fuel two stroke engines for M/T Mari Jone and M/T Mari Boyle.“The reality of a lower sulphur, lower emissions future for shipping is already here. ECA and IMO 2020 regulations mean that in addition to the shifting use trends of traditional marine fuels, shipowners and operators are increasingly turning to the use of alternative marine fuels to meet the challenges of a rapidly changing legislative and operational landscape,” says Ian Thurloway, Chevron Marine Lubricants Brand and Marketing Manager.Chevron is a leader in providing complete and reliable lubrication solutions for the all types of alternatively fueled vessels. Its full range of Taro® cylinder lubricants, from the low 25 BN Taro® Special HT LF to the new 140 BN Taro® Special HT Ultra, provide solutions for the complex operating requirements of today, and tomorrow.Alongside the use of Chevron’s Taro® cylinder lubricants, Chevron’s DOT.FAST® service is used to optimise engine lubrication and manage feedrates. DOT.FAST® provides both onboard and onshore analysis of drip oil giving an accurate measurement of total iron wear, including corrosive wear. Combining both a drip oil analyzer for iron wear and a BN tester, it is the best such service in the market today.Methanol is just one of a range of exciting alternative fuels that, along with LNG, LPG, and ethane among others, are set to play an increasingly important role in the future of shipping.As an industry leader with one of the best supply networks in the industry and a full range of products to meet the diverse range of needs of today and tomorrow, Chevron is committed to providing reliable solutions for the marine fuels of the future.Sea News, December 14 Author: Priyanka Ann Sainilast_img read more

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