Watch your language when talking about autism

first_imgLinkedIn Share on Facebook Words matter. The way we use them to communicate with or about others can have a huge impact on people’s lives. This is especially the case when it comes to disability. Handicapped. Retarded. Mad. Activists have campaigned hard to eradicate such terms, which are offensive and perpetuate a negative view of disabled people – one as passive, unable to take control over their own lives.Responding to this demand, recent government guidelines have encouraged clinicians and teachers to use positive and inclusive language, including the use of language that does not define people by their disability.“Person-first” language has become what’s called for: that is, calling someone a “person with autism” – describing what a person has, not what a person is. This has become the recommended way to speak with or about disability – in the press, journal articles, hospitals and schools. Email Pinterestcenter_img Share Share on Twitter It is difficult not to see the good intentions behind this approach. But perhaps it is not really as inclusive as it claims to be.Many disabled people have argued vehemently against the use of “person-first” language, instead preferring “disability-first” language, such as he or she is an “autistic person”. Nowhere is this issue more hotly debated than the field of autism. Many autistic activists argue that person-first language is dehumanising, as if they can somehow be separated from their autism, that there is a “typical” person affected by autism, rather than a person whose life is in part defined by being autistic.These are difficult questions. But it is surely not difficult to argue that truly inclusive language should be defined by the people who are actually autistic. Not by well-meaning outsiders, no matter how powerful. Take a look at the #actuallyautistic and #describingautism twitter handles to see some of these debates.Not right for everyoneRecently, together with the National Autistic Society, my colleagues and I asked 3,470 autistic people, parents and their broader support network, about the words they use to describe themselves, their children or the people with whom they work. Did they prefer to use “autistic person”? Or “person with autism”? Or “person who has autism”?The results clearly showed that people use many terms when talking about autism. The words “autism” and “on the autism spectrum” were clear favourites among all the groups added together. But there was much disagreement on the use of several words and phrases. Professionals preferred to use “person with autism” while autistic adults and family members preferred on the whole to use “is autistic”. They thought that the term allowed them to describe the centrality of autism to their lives.One autistic woman said:In describing someone who’s autistic as ‘a person with autism/person who has autism/(or worst of all) person who suffers from autism’ you imply that autism is separate from a person, and behind their autism is a ‘normal’ person.Agree to disagreeBut these preferences were not unanimous, of course. Instead, for autistic people, family members and professionals, the words they used often hinged on what people believed autism to be. Those who felt that autism is one trait of many in a person tended to prefer person-first language. Others, who felt that autism is central to their or their child’s identity, opted to use “autistic”. Others still noted the need to use different words depending on whom one is speaking to.There is no one way of describing autism on which everyone can agree. There never will be. In order to answer who the question of who gets to decide which terms should be used, first, everyone connected to autism needs to come to accept the fact of disagreement and to respond to it with openness, flexibility and tolerance of divergence of opinion. We should always seek to establish how people wish to be described – by asking them directly, if possible – and not impose external views or guidelines upon them.Perhaps even more importantly, we need to create the conditions for debate and conversation between all of the people who are touched by autism and work in the field. It is, after all, only when we listen to each other that we discover what individual words are taken to mean and why they often matter so much.By Liz Pellicano, UCL Institute of EducationLiz Pellicano is Reader in Developmental Cognitive Science at UCL Institute of Education.This article was originally published on The Conversation.Read the original article.last_img read more

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Circuit for experience-informed decision-making identified in rats

first_imgShare on Twitter How is the brain able to use past experiences to guide decision-making? A few years ago, researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health discovered in rats that awake mental replay of past experiences is critical for learning and making informed choices. Now, the team has discovered key secrets of the underlying brain circuitry — including a unique system that encodes location during inactive periods.“Advances such as these in understanding cellular and circuit-level processes underlying such basic functions as executive function, social cognition, and memory fit into NIMH’s mission of discovering the roots of complex behaviors,” said NIMH acting director Bruce Cuthbert, Ph.D.While a rat is moving through a maze — or just mentally replaying the experience — an area in the brain’s memory hub, or hippocampus, specialized for locations, called CA1, communicates with a decision-making area in the executive hub or prefrontal cortex (PFC). A distinct subset of PFC neurons excited during mental replay of the experience are activated during movement, while another distinct subset, less engaged during movement in the maze — and therefore potentially distracting — are inhibited during replay. LinkedIn Share on Facebook “Such strongly coordinated activity within this CA1-PFC circuit during awake replay is likely to optimize the brain’s ability to consolidate memories and use them to decide on future action” explained Shantanu Jadhav, Ph.D., now an assistant professor at Brandeis University, Waltham, MA., the study’s co-first author. His contributions to this line of research were made possible, in part, by a Pathway to Independence award from the Office of Research Training and Career Development of the NIH’s National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).Jadhav and his fellow scientist Gideon Rothschild, Ph.D., led the study under the supervision of their post-doctoral preceptor, NIMH grantee Loren Frank, Ph.D., of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). They report on their findings March 10, 2016 in the journal Neuron.When rats are exploring a maze, spatial locations on the track are represented in hippocampal and prefrontal activity, associated with slow, rhythmic theta oscillations. During awake SWRs, activity representing similar locations on the track is conjointly reactivated in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex.Prior to the study, researchers knew that the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex play a critical role in memory-guided behavior, but exactly what neural activity patterns underlie these abilities remained a mystery.Previous studies had shown that neurons called place cells in the hippocampus become associated with particular places when rats explore mazes. During breaks when animals are inactive, they replay these place experiences in their minds. The place cells that activated while exploring the maze fire again in the same sequence, but on a much faster timescale. This is reflected in telltale split-second bursts of electrical activity called sharp-wave ripples (SWRs), in the hippocampus.“We had previously shown that this SWR activity in the hippocampus is necessary for learning, but we didn’t know if or how it might engage other parts of the brain,” explained Jadhav. “We suspected that in order to support memory retrieval, hippocampal and PFC activity during SWRs has to be coordinated.”When they examined activity in groups of neurons in the two regions simultaneously as rats were learning spatial tasks, Jadhav and Rothschild’s team saw coordinated reactivation during SWRs spanning both the hippocampus and the PFC. In the PFC, they were surprised to see that this reactivation involved both excitation as well as inhibition of functionally distinct populations of neurons. Within a particular SWR, prefrontal neurons that showed spatial representations similar to the concurrently reactivated hippocampal neurons were excited, whereas prefrontal neurons with unrelated representations were inhibited. Any potentially distracting activity inconsistent with the replayed information coming from the hippocampus would thus be suppressed, presumably optimizing awake memory function.“Our results show that SWRs mark times of strong coordination between hippocampus and prefrontal cortex that reflects highly specific structured reactivation of representations related to ongoing experience,” said Jadhav.In a parallel study, Frank’s UCSF team focused on a neighboring region of the hippocampus called CA2. There, they were surprised to discover a distinct population of neurons that not only fire most strongly outside of SWRs, but also signal an animal’s location when the animal is immobile, including during sleep. The firing pattern of these neurons was thus complementary to the firing pattern of the SWR-associated place cells found in CA1.The study revealed that the brain employs distinct neural codes for formation of location-specific memories depending on whether the animal is moving or still. Notably, CA2 has also recently been linked to social memories; social experiences often take place during periods of inactivity, according to Frank.Remarkably, the timescale of the firing changes from SWR- vs. non-SWR patterns were similar in the prefrontal cortex and in CA2, indicating that the brain rapidly switches between the two coding systems with split-second agility.“Delusions and similar mental problems involve mistaking internally generated information for real things from the outside world; it may be that the rapid and precise switching between past and present that we see in normal brains is impaired in psychiatric disease,” said Frank.Frank and a UCSF team led by graduate student Kenneth Kay — whose research training was also supported, in part, by an individual NIMH fellowship award — reported on their discoveries online March 2, 2016 in the journal Nature.“Investing the next generation of research scientists, such as Jadhav and Kay, by supporting their mentored training in state-of-the-art research skills, is essential if the NIMH is to continue to accomplish our mission,” said Nancy Desmond, Ph.D., Associate Director for Research Training and Career Development in the NIMH Division of Neuroscience and Basic Behavioral Science.center_img Share Email Pinterestlast_img read more

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Puzzles persist as European E coli outbreak grows

first_img May 27 CIDRAP News story “Questions abound in European E coli outbreak” See also: The CDC said it was “not aware that a specific food has been confirmed as the source of the infections,” but it said travelers to Germany should be aware of the warning against eating cucumbers, lettuce, and tomatoes there. The CDC is working with state health departments to learn more bout the two HUS cases and identify others, the agency said in an e-mailed statement. It said anyone who recently traveled to Germany and has signs or symptoms of a Shiga-toxin producing E coli (STEC) infection or HUS should seek medical care and tell their provider about the outbreak in Germany and the importance of being tested. Germany’s Robert Koch Institute (RKI) said today the number of cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a potentially fatal kidney disorder, in the outbreak reached 373, with 6 deaths. The Associated Press (AP) said the death toll for all countries has reached 16, with 1,150 E coli cases in Germany and “hundreds more” in other countries. In the United States, two cases of HUS have been reported in people who recently traveled to Hamburg, Germany, the apparent epicenter of the outbreak, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported this afternoon. But no confirmed infections with the rare outbreak strain, E coli O104:H4, have been reported in the US, officials said. German officials have identified the outbreak strain as a multidrug-resistant E coli O104:H4, which the CDC termed a “very rare” strain. The agency said today that this precise serotype has never been seen in the United States and has rarely been seen in other countries. As reported previously, a small E coli O104 outbreak occurred in Helena, Mont., in 1994, but the serotype was O104:H21, not O104:H4. Antibiotics as risk factorCraig Hedberg, PhD, a foodborne disease expert at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, commented today that if antibiotics are being used to treat E coli patients in Europe, this might help explain the high risk of HUS in the outbreak. Yesterday’s HUS total in Germany was 329 cases, two thirds of them in women, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control reported. Meanwhile, the US Food and Drug Administration is stepping up inspections of cucumbers, lettuce, and tomatoes from Spain, according to a Reuters report today. FDA spokesman Doug Karas said Spanish cucumbers are not imported into the United States in large numbers at this time of year. May 31, 2011 (CIDRAP News) – Reported severe illnesses caused by Escherichia coli in Germany and neighboring countries continued to pile up in recent days, while mysteries about the source of the infection, why it’s so severe, and why it seems to strike mainly women remained unresolved.center_img “There is good evidence that treating a patient infected with E coli O157:H7 with an antibiotic to treat their diarrhea may increase their risk for developing HUS,” Hedberg said. “Most E coli O157:H7-associated HUS cases involve children, and children are not typically treated with ciprofloxicin. On the basis of a case-control study and limited lab evidence, the outbreak is believed to be linked to fresh cucumbers, lettuce, and tomatoes, especially Spanish cucumbers, but that has not been confirmed. Another persisting question is why the apparent proportion of HUS cases has been so high. A total of 373 HUS cases out of about 1,150 E coli cases signals an HUS rate of about 32%, far higher than in previous E coli outbreaks. In the outbreak linked to Jack in the Box hamburgers in 1992 and 1993, for example, about 7% of all cases involved HUS. Biggest E coli outbreak?The outbreak is clearly one of the largest E coli epidemics on record, but the CDC stopped short of calling it the biggest ever. “We are still learning more about the overall size of this outbreak,” the agency said. “The number of HUS cases involved indicates that the outbreak is very large.” “However, ciprofloxicin would be the drug of choice for empirically treating an adult with an acute diarrheal illness [in which the specific pathogen has not been identified]. If this were a common practice in Germany, it could account for some of the apparently high risk of HUS associated with this outbreak. I don’t have any information on this, but it is certainly something that should be evaluated.” German officials today continued to warn against eating raw cucumbers, lettuce, and tomatoes, especially in northern Germany, according to the RKI. A public health laboratory in Hamburg on May 26 identified E coli on four cucumbers, three of them from Spain, as reported previously. But according to today’s AP report, Hamburg officials said tests on two of the cucumbers pointed to a strain different from the outbreak strain. In other observations, he said that if fresh produce items are confirmed as the source of the outbreak, that may help explain why so many of the patients are women. Produce has been the source food in some Salmonella and E coli O157:H7 outbreaks that mainly involved women, he noted, adding, “Because women are more likely to eat these food items, they are more likely to be exposed to the [E coli] strain contaminating the food items,” he said. The agency also commented, “It is too early to know why this is such a large outbreak. The large size may have to do with contamination of a popular food item. However, to our knowledge a specific food vehicle has yet to be confirmed. It is also possible that the unusual strain is particularly likely to cause HUS.” Hedberg called the size and severity of the outbreak “unprecedented” and predicted that it will lead to research that will “greatly expand our understanding of the pathogenesis and variability” of enterohemorrhagic E coli.last_img read more

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Senate committee probes proposed US Ebola funding

first_imgThe White House’s $6.18 billion emergency funding request for the domestic and global fight against Ebola received its first hearing in Congress today, prompting questions from senators on whether the funding and response steps have the right targets and garnering support from dozens of health groups, whose representatives said the funds are needed to build preparedness.Also in Washington, DC, today nurses from the nation’s biggest union held a vigil and press conference outside the White House to call for better personal protective equipment (PPE) for Ebola caregivers. The nurses also voiced concern over eroding patient care standards in the United States and globally.Events planned by National Nurses United (NNU) included strikes, pickets, rallies, and candlelight vigils in 15 states, as well as in Australia, Canada, Ireland, the Philippines, and Spain.Senators scrutinize emergency funding requestPresident Barack Obama on Nov 5 asked Congress for the Ebola investment, which includes $4.5 billion for the immediate response and $1.5 billion in contingency funds. The funding would be part of a $1 trillion spending package that House and Senate members are working on to fund the government past Dec 11 through the end of the fiscal year.Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., appropriations committee chair, said the $6.2 billion request was in line with emergency requests approved with bipartisan support to battle other diseases: $6.1 billion to address the avian flu threat during the Bush administration and $6.4 billion to respond to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic during the Obama administration.”We have done this before when we have been faced with emergencies. Now we have to tackle this new development,” she said.Representatives from all of the federal agencies involved in the response were on hand to testify. Also, testimonies of at least 60 outside witnesses were submitted, representing 116 different health organizations. Mikulski said the bulk of the statements said sustained investments are needed for public health and that emergency funds are needed to battle Ebola in the short term.Richard Shelby (R-Ala.), the committee’s ranking member, said the size of the request, the government’s slow progress in detailing how it would spend the money, and missteps warrant the committee’s scrutiny. He said the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance for hospitals has been a moving target and that the Obama administration has sent mixed messages on quarantine issues. He said he is worried that federal Ebola plans revolve mainly around preparing for best-case scenarios.”Competent crisis planning, however, must include contingencies for the worst-case scenario, as well,” Shelby said, urging officials not to rule out any reasonable option for preventing the disease in the United States, including travel and visa restrictions.Officials who testified today were from the State Department, which includes the US Agency for International Development (USAID), the Department of Defense (DoD), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). In their opening statements, each official outlined agency requests:HHS: $2.43 billion focusing on preparedness for US health and public health systems, development of vaccines and drugs, and battling the disease in West AfricaDHS: $13.2 million, which includes $10.2 million for enhanced medical screening personnel and the rest for PPE, overtime, and other response costsState Department/USAID: $2.89 billion, which includes $2.1 billion in base funding to battle the outbreak in West Africa and $792 million in contingency funding as the outbreak evolvesDoD: $112 million for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to work on technologies to provide immediate temporary immunity and shorten the timelines for vaccine developmentMikulski aired some of the NNU concerns, including a request that Obama use his executive authority to set standardized PPE protocols.HHS Secretary Sylvia Burwell said federal efforts have trained about 250,000 health workers in Ebola infection control and efforts are needed to continue the training, measure if it’s working, and assess if caregivers are comfortable with it. She said the funding request includes money for continuing Ebola training.Quarantine questioningSeveral senators questioned federal officials on why the DoD has a more stringent quarantine policy for troops returning from West Africa than the CDC’s recommendations  for travelers arriving from West Africa, including healthcare workers returning from treating Ebola patients.On Nov 7 the DoD announced more details about its mandatory 21-day controlled monitoring for service members returning from Operation United Assistance, which involves seven bases that will temporarily house the troops. So far, nearly 2,000 troops have been deployed to the region.Maj Gen James Lariviere, deputy director for politico-military affairs (Africa) and the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said that although the approach is more conservative, it isn’t based on scientific information that other agencies don’t have. He characterized the decision as operationally based, rather than medically based.Burwell added that the differences in approaches is influenced by the desires of the groups involved, and said that although the quarantine decisions should be based on level of risk and science, “it’s also important to respect those who are serving and the desires of those who have taken the step to serve.”Other medical concernsMike Johanns, R-Neb., asked federal officials if funds should be included to help cover costs for treating Ebola patients, since the cost of treatment can be extremely high, with private insurance not likely to cover all of the costs. Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha is one of the high-biocontainment units that has treated some of the US-based Ebola patients. Johanns urged federal officials to consider, given the challenge of treating Ebola patients, a more regional care model.Burwell said federal officials are taking a phased approach to beefing up biocontainment capacity and for now are focusing on facilities that are near five airports that are funneling all of the travelers arriving from West Africa.Some senators raised concerns about whether there is enough in Obama’s request to build up health systems and disease detection capacities in the wider West Africa region. Chris Coons, D-Del., said he spoke with Liberia’s President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, who relayed her gratefulness to Americans for the US response efforts but urged the country to not ease off on its efforts.CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, said the CDC already has teams in each of the surrounding countries, and he said the cluster of Ebola infections in Mali (see related CIDRAP News story today) is a great concern.A handful of legislators pressed federal officials about why the United States hasn’t limited visas for people traveling from West Africa, similar to what Australia and Canada have done.DHS secretary Jeh Johnson said there are already mechanisms in place for denying visas to people when officials determine that travel would be too risky. He said, however, that putting a broader ban in place would set a dangerous precedent and hamper the response effort.”The biggest concern about limiting the number of visas is that other nations would follow, and that would isolate [outbreak] countries,” Johnson said. “I don’t want to see our country become a leader in isolating those countries.”Health groups weigh in on Ebola fundingTrust for America’s Health (TFAH), one of the groups that submitted a witness statement, said it supported the request, especially the funds that will go toward building long-term public health capacity in West Africa, assist state and local public health departments, and beef up the Strategic National Stockpile and hospital preparedness.Jeffrey Levi, PhD, TFAH’s executive director, said in the group’s statement that infectious disease control needs constant vigilance, requiring both emergency and ongoing funding. “Quite simply, we will never have a reliable public health system if it is constantly scrambling from crisis to crisis and from emergency funding stream to emergency funding stream with no continuity.”In testimony submitted by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the group’s president, Stephen Calderwood, MD, said it and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society strongly support the Ebola funding request, both for response and to build capacity to address infectious diseases. “We urge that that this funding not come at the expense of other infectious disease programs, so that preparedness and response efforts for future outbreaks are not undermined.”Liberian man’s family, hospital reach settlementIn other US Ebola developments today, the Dallas hospital that cared for the Liberian man who was the nation’s first Ebola patient said it has resolved matters with the man’s family.Thomas Eric Duncan, who got sick with the virus after arriving from Liberia, was hospitalized at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, where he died on Oct 8. After he died, his family called for an investigation into the care the man received, especially why he was released from the emergency department during an initial visit 2 days before he was isolated at the hospital.In a statement today, the hospital’s parent company, Texas Health Resources, repeated its condolences and said it regretted that the Ebola diagnosis wasn’t made during Duncan’s first visit to the emergency department, 2 days before he returned by ambulance and admitted. The man’s travel history to Liberia wasn’t fully communicated to his care team at that visit, and some experts have said a quicker Ebola diagnosis could have improved Duncan’s prognosis.Texas Health Resources said it is honoring Duncan by creating a memorial fund in his name to assist Ebola victims in Africa. It said it appreciates acknowledgment by the family’s attorney that Duncan received excellent inpatient care. “We are grateful to reach this point of reconciliation and healing for all involved,” it said in the statement.Financial details of the agreement were confidential, but Duncan’s family will benefit, the Dallas Morning News reported today.See also:Senate appropriations committee background materials and testimonyNov 11 NNU press releaseNov 12 TFAH news releaseNov 12 Texas Health Resources statementNov 12 Dallas Morning News storylast_img read more

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Stewardship / Resistance Scan for Aug 03, 2018

first_imgFDA issues azithromycin warning for cancer patients receiving stem cellsThe US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today issued a warning about long-term azithromycin use in cancer patients who’ve undergone a donor stem cell transplant.The warning is based on the results of a clinical trial that found an increased rate of relapse in cancers affecting the blood and lymph nodes—and an increased death rate—among stem-cell transplant patients who were being treated with azithromycin to prevent bronchiolitis obliterans, a serious lung condition caused by inflammation and scarring in the airways of the lungs.The researchers observed cancer relapse in 77 patients (32.9%) with azithromycin treatment compared with 48 patients (20.8%) taking placebo, and a total of 95 patients died in the azithromycin group compared with 66 patients in the placebo group. The investigators concluded that the risks of long-term azithromycin exposure after donor stem cell transplantation may exceed the benefits.Although the trial could not determine why rates of cancer relapse and death were higher with azithromycin (which is not approved for preventing the condition), the FDA says healthcare providers should not prescribe long-term azithromycin to prevent bronchiolitis obliterans in patients with cancers of the blood or lymph nodes who’ve had a donor stem cell transplant. The agency says it’s reviewing additional data and will communicate its conclusions and recommendations when the review is complete.Pfizer, the manufacturer of Zithromax, is providing a letter on this safety issue to providers who care for patients undergoing stem cell transplants. Aug 3 FDA safety announcement Study highlights clinical, financial costs of kidney injury with polymyxinA study today in Open Forum Infectious Diseases details the impacts of acute kidney injury in patients treated with polymyxin antibiotics.The retrospective database analysis looked at adults who received intravenous (IV) treatment with one of two polymyxin antibiotics—sodium colistimethate (CMS) or polymyxin B (PMB)—for more than 3 consecutive days. The use of polymyxins has been on the rise as gram-negative organisms have grown increasingly resistant to other antibiotics, but there are concerns about drug-induced nephrotoxicity, specifically acute kidney injury (AKI). The researchers were seeking to assess the mortality risk, inpatient length of stay, and total hospitalization costs associated with AKI among patients who receive the drugs.A total of 4,886 patients were included: 4,103 who received CMS and 783 who received PMB. In the multivariable analysis, the presence of AKI was associated with higher in-hospital mortality in the CMS group (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.3) and the PMB cohort (aOR, 2.7) than those who didn’t develop AKI, and with longer hospital stays (9.7 days and 11.6 days in the CMS and PMB cohorts, respectively). Mean total hospitalization costs were also higher for patients with AKI—$47,820 higher in the CMS cohort and $35,244 higher in the PMB cohort.”Our findings suggest that the clinical and economic burden of AKI among polymyxin recipients is substantial and polymyxin therapy should be used judiciously,” the authors conclude.The study was sponsored by Allergan plc.Aug 3 Open Forum Infect Dis abstractlast_img read more

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Feeling Festive?

first_imgTis officially “the season.” Whether it’s through your stomach, like the Chocolate Fest, or filling your bag up with handcrafted goodies, we’ve got a list of happenings all across the island to get you into the holiday spirit, whatever it is you choose to celebrate.Indulge in your sweet tooth November 9 and 10 from 10 AM to 6 PM at the Walt Whitman Shops in Huntington at the I Love Chocolate Fest. There will undoubtedly be plenty to eat, but even more ideas of what to get your loved ones for the weeks to come. www.lovechocolatefest.com.Seeking a craft fair? The eighth annual Hauppauge Craft and Gift Fair will occur November 9 and November 10 from 10 AM to 4 PM. The 33rd annual East Islip Craft and Gift Fair returns November 23 and November 24 from 10 AM to 4 PM at East Islip High School. Northport will hold its 25th annual Craft Fair December 7 and December 8 starting at 10 AM at Northport High School. Head to the St. James-Smithtown Craft Fair on December 14 and December 15 from 10 AM to 4 PM at the Smithtown East High School. The 38th annual Selden Craft and Gift Fair takes place December 21 and December 22 from 10 AM to 4 PM. All are free admission and additional details can be found at www.depasmarket.com.Harborfields Public Library in Greenlawn will host a holiday craft fair on November 8 and November 9 from 9 AM to 4 PM, with 50 vendors and one-of-a-kind gifts. www.harborfieldslibrary.org.The Long Island Woodworkers Show returns to Old Bethpage Village Restoration on November 9 from 10 AM to 4 PM, featuring handcrafted furniture and projects, even demonstrations. Go to www.liwoodworkers.org.The Long Island Children’s Museum in Garden City will have A Victorian Tree: Festival of Trees on November 16 from 1 to 4 PM. Learn more at www.licm.org.The Gobble Gobble Book Fest comes to Cedarhurst on November 17 from 10 AM to 12 PM at Hindi’s Libraries with interactive story time, live music, cookie decorating, and more. Call 516-400-3428.Garvies Point Museum’s Native American Feast takes place just in time for Thanksgiving on November 23 and November 24 from 10 AM to 4 PM, in celebration of the northeastern Native American culture, a tradition for over 25 years. Foods, medicinal plants, face painting, and more, will be available in Glen Cove. www.garviespointmuseum.com.The 30th Annual Long Island Festival of Trees will take place November 29 through December 1 from 10 AM to 5 PM at the Cradle of Aviation Museum in Garden City. In addition to indoor ice skating, it’s a great shopping opportunity for unique vendor gifts, designer trees, and the chance to meet Santa. www.cpnassau.org.Have great expectations at the 23rd annual Charles Dickens Festival on December 1 and 2 throughout the Village of Port Jefferson as it transforms into pages out of Dickens’s novels. Musical and magic performances, and, of course, a production of “A Christmas Carol.” www.portjeff.com.Nassau Museum will host the Children’s Book Festival on December 1, from 11 AM to 4 PM, at The Manes Center. Enjoy a story read by exhibiting illustrators from the museum’s current exhibit. Learn more at www.nassaumuseum.org.Ashawagh Hall in Springs is the home of the ninth annual Friends Bazaar on Saturday, December 7, from 10 AM to 5 PM. Admission is free; inside is arts and crafts, ceramics, photography, jewelry, fiber arts, home décor, bags, scrimshaw, ornaments, hand soaps, and more. For further information, contact jamielerner28@gmail.com.Stony Brook Village Center will have a holiday festival on December 8 from 12 to 5:30 PM. Live music, trees, holiday windows, train display, and Santa. Head to www.stonybrookvillage.com.nicole@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Acquisition complements Air Liquide Electronics

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Praxair starts up Oklahoma plant

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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The SAFE-BAND Group to Begin SAFE-BAND Geohazard Survey

first_imgNCS Subsea, GeoTrace and SpecPartners have announced the start date for a multiphase large scale innovative project called SAFE-BAND.It will be the first Multi-Client geohazard survey on a regional scale utilizing Ultra-High-Resolution 3D Seismic (UHR3D).The combination of the P-Cable Technology and NCS’s own proprietary navigation system, NavPoint Trawler, produces an unprecedented resolution of the near-surface geological structures for Geohazard Imaging, 4D Imaging, Shallow Reservoir Imaging and Environmental Safety.This will provide a new level of informational detail for drilling and development planners, and also provide additional information for the exploration teams.Industry underwriting has been secured and acquisition starts June 1, 2014.Press Release, April 30, 2014last_img read more

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MISC Q2 revenue climbs

first_img LNG World News Staff; Image: MISC LNG shipper MISC of Malaysia reported 2.4% higher revenue to RM2,600.5 million in the second quarter of this year.The increase in revenue was mainly due to improved freight rates in petroleum business, revenue recognised from an EPC project in the current quarter and finance lease income contribution of an FPSO unit which commenced in September 2014, the company said in a statement on Tuesday.However, a smaller fleet of operating vessels in chemical business, lower earning days in LNG business and different phases of project construction in Heavy Engineering caused a decline in revenue of the respective businesses in the current quarter, MISC said.MISC’s operating profit of RM674.2 million was 76.3% higher than the corresponding quarter’s profit of RM382.3 million.Group revenue for the 6 months ended 30 June of RM5,090.7 million was 5.4% higher when compared to the same period a year ago.1 Malaysian ringgit = 0.259491 U.S. dollarslast_img read more

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