Howard Hall hosts annual Totter for Water

first_imgNew students on campus might wonder why there will be a teeter totter in the middle of South Quad on Thursday and Friday. Each fall, the women of Howard Hall spend 24 hours riding the totter to help raise money for projects dedicated to clean water access in communities across the globe as part of the dorm’s annual Totter for Water event.At 6 p.m. Thursday, Howard’s residents will begin taking shifts operating the totter and continue their work throughout the night. Students will have the opportunity to ride the totter if they desire and are encouraged to help Howard in their fundraising goals. This year, sophomores Eileen Leach and Sarah Walters are planning the event.Leach and Walters said the dorm is hoping to raise $25,000 at this year’s event — about $7,000 more than last year. To accomplish such a task, they began the planning process before they arrived to campus.“Sarah and I have been working on the project for several weeks now, we contacted the organization, made t-shirt designs and poster designs,” Leach said.Students working on the event attempt to involve all members of the Notre Dame community. The money Howard fundraises comes from student donations on the day of the event, from both online donations and from selling succulents on South Quad. Anyone interested in donating can give to the cause on the Student Shop ND website. There will also be other forms of entertainment on Thursday night, Leach said.“This year we are having a bouncy house on Thursday as well,” she said.Leach explained that all of the money Howard raises from the event this year will benefit a community in Ecuador.“In the past the money has gone to build wells or develop water systems for schools,” she said. “We have worked with Engineers without Borders in the past and that’s also who we’re working with this year — the Notre Dame chapter. They are going to be traveling to San Pedro de Suma, Ecuador, to build a water chlorination system, specifically for a school in the region.”Sophomore Catherine Connell said she participated last year after noticing the presence of a seesaw on the quad.“I saw a teeter totter on South Quad, so some friends and I went to see what was going on,” she said. “We ended up riding the totter and buying succulents. It was a fun opportunity to break from studying and also help a good cause.”Alix Basden, a Howard sophomore who said she will be riding the totter at midnight, said the event helps the dorm grow in community.“Howard is the single most intentional community I have ever been a part of,” she said. “It is a strong sisterhood. [With Totter], we create an international community and partnership.”For instance, last year Basden shared her totter shift with someone she didn’t know particularly well at the time. Now, that situation has changed.“It’s pure fun to be out on that seesaw,” Basden said. “Last year, I did the 1 a.m. shift. I went to the Totter with a girl I wasn’t that close with at the time, and we rode the Totter for 30 minutes together. Now she’s my roommate.”Tags: Community, ecuador, Howard Hall, totter for waterlast_img read more

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EB17: DT Swiss fills out 2018 Road Revolution with Cross & Track updates

first_imgDT Swiss started a Road Revolution campaign to completely revamp their road wheel line ups almost a year ago with the introduction of the Endurance ERC 1100 wheels developed in the wind tunnel with SwissSide. Next came the Aero focused make-over topped by the ARC 1100 wheels and the Performance all rounder race wheels with the PRC 1400. Just two segments remained Cyclocross and Track, so DT has revamped the C & T series wheels to finish off the overhaul.#RoadRevolution18While the new Endurance & Aero categories were all about developing the newest integrated tech and most aerodynamic solutions for their segments, the overhaul of the rest of the road line has put a lot of effort into better defining a structure and intended use for each road wheel offered.Road Revolution breakdownThe new five categories each have their target use type, their own rim internal width & ideal tire width range. The each identify design priorities that mesh with those use groups.Another key point is a unified naming convention. While the previous names were all over the place making is just as difficult for a consumer to know what they were getting as it was for a product manager trying to decide on an OEM spec wheel on a new bike.Now every road wheel name starts with the first letter of one of the five categories, then a more ‘race’ wheel will add on an ‘R’ and a carbon rim will add a ‘C’. The numbers then denote the hubs, with 1100 getting SINC ceramic bearings in a top-level low-profile Dicut hub (based on 180s), 1400 getting steel bearings in the same hub shell (based on 240s), 1600 stepping down to the machined hubs still with star ratchet internals from the 350s, and 1800 dropping to hubs with a classic 3-pawl engagement. With that you can sus out the full spec details, just from the name of the wheel.Cross Roadcourtesy DT SwissDT is calling the cyclocross segment Cross Road in part because so many of the wheels they build are just as likely to end up on a gravel or adventure bike, as they would on an actual cyclocross bike. While we look at their Endurance wheels like the ERC 1100 as being gravel capable (and have gotten them plenty dirty along the way),  gravel riding officially falls into the Cross Road category according to DT.CR 1600 Spline 23Cross Road wheels are “inspired by the tough world of cyclocross” but really open for any kind of mixed-surface riding you might task a 700c wheelset of tackling. Dirt roads, muddy forest paths, even singletrack.1600 hubFor the time being Cross Road gets just two wheelsets – the CR 1600 Spline & C 1800 Spline – which use the same 23mm deep aluminum rim, now 22mm wide inside/26mm outside.C 1800 Spline 23The difference is the hub internals, with the star ratchet CR 1600s selling for $762/578€ from 1728g, and the classic 3-pawl C 1800s retailing for $538/408€ from 1745g.1800 hubBoth wheelsets are disc brake only and tubeless ready. Currently there are no carbon Cross Road wheels, nor are there any tubulars. But we’ve talked with DT Swiss about those gaps, and they seemed cagey on details, but it is pretty clear that they are working on more new wheels to fill out the category now that the whole update of the road wheel structure is finalized.TrackTRC 1400 Dicut 65Track keeps it simple. At the top end these are wheels destined to spend their life leaning into banked left turns on the velodrome, whether that is smooth wood inside or deteriorating concrete outside. The rise of fixed gear crit racing has also supported the continued growth of top-level fixed racing off of the velodrome, but still on track wheels.Then rounding out the lower end of the Track family is the continued need for urban fixed gear and singlespeed bikes searching for the deep track look, but in a more affordable & reasonable wheelset for rolling through city streets.T 1800 Classic 32There are just two dedicated new track wheels as well – the TRC 1400 Dicut & T 1800 Classic. In fact the premium TRC wheels are available in either $2857/2168€ clinchers (1698g) or $2672/2028€ tubulars (1528g) both in a 65mm deep carbon rim profile borrowed directly from the PRC wheels and fixie hubs based on 240s. The T 1800 Classic sticks with a 32mm deep, 18mm internal tubeless-ready alloy rim for a $630/478€ pricetag and life on the streets at 1896g.DTSwiss.comlast_img read more

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How ignoring mobile device security increases your risk

first_imgEnticed by the promise of increased performance and employee flexibility, financial institutions are rightfully beginning to allow employees to bring personally-owned devices into the workplace. Moving into the fully mobile workforce era, we see the trend continue to move into the hands of the consumer. While controlling the enterprise used to be a fairly simple endeavor, financial institutions are now faced with a never-ending onslaught of devices that are smaller, faster and more capable than even the computers sitting on the desktop. Without effective risk strategies, this poses a significant threat to any financial institution that allows Bring Your Own Devices (BYOD) into their environment.Recent Forrester Research studies show that three out of four professionals use personal devices to access corporate data, with 53 percent of all employees bringing some sort of personally-owned device to work each day. Combine that with the statistics that show over 70 million mobile devices are lost or stolen each year, with about 46 percent of devices in the workplace being completely unmanaged, it is clear that we have a very large problem.First, let’s fully understand the risks. Today’s typical smartphones are not just phones. They are cameras, voice recorders, scanners, calendars, clocks, navigation systems, gambling devices, portable movie theatres, bookstores, magazine racks, games, and computers. The major issue is that the company’s data is now being stored and transmitted using these devices that the employer does not control, which is sometimes in direct conflict with governmental regulations and recommendations that ask us to carefully protect the privacy and security of sensitive, personal and financial information.New software, known as Mobile Device Management (MDM) can assist with these risks, and amidst this extreme mobile era, should be considered a mandatory first step if you allow personally-owned devices to have access to your corporate data or network. But equally important, a comprehensive review of policies and procedures is needed to ensure that not only are employees required to behave correctly in respect to protecting this data, but also to protect the company from employee litigation. Many financial institutions are finding gaps in policies and procedures regarding appropriate use of technology because the rules were based on the functionality of devices that existed when the policies and procedures were initially drafted. Policies and procedures should no longer be specific to just the hardware being used, but also should address the broad range of activities for which these devices can be used.We have to keep in mind that not only do we have issues with keeping our corporate and clients’ data safe, but we also now have the added issue of these devices being used for both personal and work purposes. This opens financial institutions to risk not just from loss of company data, but also to litigation risk from employees who have expectations of privacy on a device that is owned by them. The U.S. courts have consistently held up employees’ rights when employers have attempted to gain access to an employee’s personal device. This has implications for record management regulations, privacy of employee data, overtime for employees using a dual-use device, and access to the employee’s device during litigation holds and investigations.In order to adequately mitigate the risks associated with BYOD programs, we of course first need to implement strong technical controls using MDM software. This software generally covers device restrictions, encryption, strong passwords and the ability to locate the device and remotely wipe the data from it. But we also need to move beyond simple technical controls and develop a full RiskManagement program around BYOD.
At a minimum, action items should include:Implement MDM software with strong technical controls.Develop employee agreements that cover not only the acceptable use of the device, but also reserve the right of the institution 
to access or wipe the device as needed.Implement operating procedures that ensure all devices are indeed covered and are being used appropriately.Develop and deliver mandatory employee training to teach employees how they should handle the loss or theft of the device 
and covers the aforementioned policies.Develop a risk management approach to mobile device security.Policies that will likely need to be modified to successfully mitigate risk are:Employee AgreementsAcceptable Use PoliciesCompliance and Ethics PoliciesData Privacy and Security PoliciesRecords Management PoliciesLitigation Hold PoliciesConfidentiality PoliciesEntering into the Bring Your Own Device era can be dangerous territory, but with a strong risk management approach and appropriate technical tools, it is possible to achieve the promise of increased employee productivity while mitigating the risks associated with mobile devices.D+H provides several tools to assist in creating a solid Mobile Device Management program Compushare C3 and Compushare Mobile Device Management. 57SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Karn Griffen Karn Griffen leads the architecture team for the Compushare suite of products at D+H. Under Griffen’s lea dership, his team provides design and development expertise for the cloud … Web: www.dh.com Detailslast_img read more

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Here’s An Easy Way To Improve Your Writing Immensely

first_imgBusiness Insider Australia: Great writing requires clear thinking. Just ask Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon. “There is no way to write a six-page, narratively structured memo and not have clear thinking,” he has said. Writing, even though you’re most likely a long way removed from your college essay days, remains a key skill for success.Which is what makes new research out of George Mason University relevant to you. Something that you are probably doing every day is making you a much worse writer than you otherwise would be, the findings revealed.What is this simple activity that severely dips your writing skill? Simple, everyday interruptions.Read the whole story: Business Insider Australia More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Separate brain circuits for taste and calories helps explain the power of sugar

first_imgShare on Facebook Sugar’s sweetness and calorie content combine to give it lethal power to destroy diets, many scientists have assumed. However, new study by Yale University researchers says the brain responds to taste and calorie counts in fundamentally different ways. And only one of these responses explains why most New Years’ resolutions have already disappeared under a deluge of Boston Crème Pies.It’s the brain’s desire for calories — not sweetness — that dominates our desire for sugars, according to the study appearing Jan. 25, 2016 in the journal Nature Neuroscience.“It turns out the brain actually has two segregated sets of neurons to process sweetness and energy signals,” said Ivan de Araujo of the John B. Pierce Laboratory and senior author of the study. “If the brain is given the choice between pleasant taste and no energy, or unpleasant taste and energy, the brain picks energy.” Share on Twitter Pinterest LinkedIncenter_img Share Email Both sweet taste and nutrient value register in the striatum, an ancient region of the brain involved in processing rewards. Humans have a sweet tooth as one way to ensure we eat enough to give our large brains enough calories to operate at peak efficiency. However, the Yale team studying the brains of mice showed that signals for taste and nutrients are processed in two separate areas of the striatum, the ventral and dorsal, respectively. Signals about the value of taste are processed in the ventral striatum while nutritional value was processed in the dorsal striatum. The dorsal striatum remained responsive to energy even when calories fed to mice were paired with a very aversive taste.The researchers then asked which signal had more control over eating behavior. Mice fed both sugar with sweet taste but no calories or sugar that contained calories but was altered to taste horribly preferred the sugar with energy. When neurons in dorsal striatum were activated by light a technique called optogenetics, mice also ate copious amounts of bad-tasting sugar.“The sugar-responsive circuitry in the brain is therefore hardwired to prioritize calorie seeking over taste quality,” de Iraujo said.The authors hope findings help spur new strategies aiming at curbing excess sugar intake.last_img read more

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NEWS SCAN: Cholera in Haiti, Listeria kills two, MRSA variant

first_imgJun 3, 2011Cholera cases spike in Haiti’s capitalHaiti’s capital, Port-au-Prince, is experience a surge of new cholera infections, according to aid groups working in the area. An official from Oxfam, an international confederation of 14 organizations, said yesterday that the impact of the disease on the city’s Carrefour area is currently worse than during the height of the country’s outbreak in November 2010. Mimy Muisa Kambere said in a statement that the area is registering 300 new cases a day, compared with 900 per week earlier in the outbreak. However, she added that the death rate is lower than before, because people are getting treatment faster.Jun 2 Oxfam statementIn a related development, the American Red Cross said today that it is reopening a treatment center in Carrefour to handle the spike in cholera cases in and around Port-au-Prince. In a statement, the group said it was stepping up other outbreak response efforts as Haiti enters its rainy season. It is deploying teams of health educators to cholera hot spots and is sending text messages to people in high-risk areas to notify them about treatment center locations and share cholera prevention tips.Two die of Listeria in DenverThree Listeria infections, two of them fatal, are being investigated in Denver, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) announced yesterday. Those who died were a man in his 30s and a woman in her 60s. All three cases involve people of Hispanic heritage, the CDPHE said. The source of the cases was unknown and under investigation. Alicia Cronquist, a CDPHE epidemiologist, urged the public to take precautions to avoid Listeria, including avoiding soft cheeses unless they are made with pasteurized milk, hot dogs and deli meats unless reheated to 165ºF, refrigerated pate or meat spreads, and refrigerated seafood. Those at high risk include people with weakened immune systems, pregnant women, and those older than 60, she noted. Colorado has only about 10 cases of listeriosis per year on average, the statement said.Research groups detail new MRSA variantTwo research groups have identified a new variant of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), according to two studies that appeared yesterday and today in different medical journals. One group reported finding the new type in patients in Irish hospitals, and their study appeared yesterday in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, published by the American Society for Microbiology (ASM). Another group detected the strain’s emergence in human and cow populations in the United Kingdom and Denmark and detailed its results in Lancet Infectious Diseases. The new strain isn’t identified as MRSA by current lab tests, which has implications for clinical diagnosis and treatment. Irish and German researchers used high-throughput DNA microarray screening to identify the new strain, which belongs to a genetic lineage clonal complex seen only previously in cows and other animals, according to an ASM press release. While preparing their study for press, the researchers learned that a UK group had identified a bovine MRSA strain with a nearly identical genetic pattern that had emerged in both bovine and human populations in the United Kingdom and Denmark. They identified the MRSA strain in bulk milk, and they also found it when they looked for the strain in veterinary and human MRSA reference lab collections. They say the findings suggest that cows may be reservoirs for human MRSA.Jun 2 Antimicrob Agents Chemother abstractJun 3 Lancet Infect Dis abstractlast_img read more

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Topper Girls Golf 2020 Season Gets Underway

first_imgThe Mower sisters, Muira and Gabriela go head-to-head on the putting practice green. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.com Coach Susan Hammock helps new players select a set of clubs, which are sized to fit each player.  Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.com Returning players wait their turn to the practice putting green. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.com Coach Tim Hammock works with new players at the chipping and putting green, demonstrating the proper technique for holding a club and how to chip the ball onto the green. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.comcenter_img Coach Susan Hammock works with Nathalia Licon on grip and alignment for chipping the ball. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.com Finally, the Los Alamos High School sports season is ‘kinda’ getting underway. Volleyball, boys golf, girls golf and cross country have the go-a-head to start practice with competition beginning in October, the preset plan. Girls Coach Tim Hammock checks his team into practice Friday afternoon at the Los Alamos County Golf Course, following social distancing guidelines. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.comlast_img read more

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How To Dine And Prosper At HIFF

first_imgIf you are here for the Hamptons International Film Festival, chances are you are staying in or near East Hampton Village.It is, to be sure, one of the most quaint, historic villages around. But it can be quirky, especially to a stranger. Know this: You’ll be looking for places to get some grub between movies, and that means in and out in a hurry, and portable.Luckily, some of these places have been around as long as HIFF. They know what you need.The unquestioned epicenter of all things HIFF related is John Papas Café (631-324-5400). It’s also where the biggest stars and the hottest names attending the film festival will almost surely go. Papas is also cool because breakfast can be had all day. Alec, Jerry (Seinfeld, that is), Sarah Jessica Parker, and many more stars are in there all year long.Our faves? Challah bread French toast, chicken souvlaki (all the Greek dishes are good), and the early dinner specials — try the prime rib, a steal at around $23.You can’t miss Citarella (631-283-6600), it is virtually next door to the United Artists multiplex on Main Street. Citarella used to be primarily for take-out, but the café inside (breakfast and lunch only) is attracting crowds nowadays, possibly because there is a good selection of sushi and maybe, just maybe, because they make the best omelets in town.Some HIFF attendees don’t realize we have a real pizzeria right in East Hampton Village that is as good as any Brooklyn has to offer. It’s Fierro’s (631-324-5751), right across the alley from Waldbaum’s on Newtown Lane. They are pros — they’ll get you in and out quickly, yet everything is made fresh. Hint: You can also buy candy for the movie there and save a bundle, especially if the kids are with you.There is a terrific variety of slices or whole pies, hot and cold heroes, and a lot of stuff you wouldn’t expect, like salads and wraps, and even paninis. There are tables inside, or get it to go. They also have those neat little bottles of Chianti you can smuggle into the theater.Across the street, hidden down the alley next to the Middle School, is an authentic Chinese take-out place, oddly enough named Chinatown (631-324-1999). We love the pupu platter for two and the sweet and sour chicken. There is no place to eat inside but the park is right across the street. They also deliver.Mary’s Marvelous (631-324-1055) on Newtown Lane has all the favorites from the Amagansett store, including delicious home-baked treats and hearty sandwiches and soups for lunch. Eat all the sugary stuff you want, just make sure you put some kale in your smoothie and wear your gym clothes and you’ll convince everyone at the theater you are still diligently working out.Villa Italian Specialties, around the corner from Mary’s, by the train station, makes its signature Italian hero to go, so you can smuggle it into the theater if need be.Parking And LodgingThere is very limited motel space within walking distance of East Hampton village, and you can be quite certain all the rooms are booked. If you are staying anywhere else, like Montauk or Hampton Bays, for example, you’ll need a car.The trick is knowing where to park it. The only sure way to dump your wheels and zone out in the theaters for 14 hours is to locate the long-term parking lot in the village. It’s just north of the train station, just east of the YMCA, and behind Herrick Park to the north. Set your GPS to Maidstone Lane or Pleasant Lane.There is a fee for overnight parking and an automated machine, but it’s reasonable, safe, and secure. HINT: There is a walking path going right through the park and into the Park Place parking lot behind Main Street.Public BathroomsIf you are in the village all day, be advised merchants frown upon freeloaders looking to use the facilities. So, unless you are willing to buy an $850 puce mohair V-neck, hear me now and believe me later: There is exactly one public bathroom, and it is in the Reutershan parking lot behind Main Street, west of Newtown Lane, on the north side near the tennis courts.The movie theater itself is the next best bet. Tip: Use the facility and then buy the popcorn. Just sayin’. Sharelast_img read more

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LSB’s £20m is a drop in the ocean, says Kenny

first_imgThe £20m set-up costs of the Legal Services Board and Office for Legal Complaints to be paid for by the sector ‘is a not a real issue’, according to LSB chief executive Chris Kenny. Speaking to the Gazette, Kenny (pictured) said that, against the 2006 Office for National Statistics estimate that the legal sector generates £23bn to the economy, £20m demanded from the eight approved regulators is ‘not enormous’. An initial £15.1m, of the £19.9 m, is due by 28 February 2010, with an LSB consultation document recommending that the Law Society, as an approved regulator, pay 90%. A consultation on these proposals ends on 2 July. Kenny said: ‘We worked out the cost of the LSB and it worked out as £33 per [authorised] person. It is not the kind of cost that will put a firm into bankruptcy. ‘We are in a position of setting a levy and we will send eight bills each year. The individual regulator can decide how to proportionate it. We are a multiplicity of mechanisms. It will be for the approved regulators to decide for themselves.’ The new levy comes at time when the Law Society is struggling to keep future compensation fund and practising certificate fees down. At a meeting of the Law Society council last week, Society chief executive Des Hudson said ‘major issues’ will surround the introduction of the OLC, which will take over from the Legal Services Complaints next year, as there is likely to be some overlap that will add cost. He warned members: ‘How do we deliver cost effectiveness? It is a critical issue.’last_img read more

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