New psychology research shows early life stress doesn’t have to be extreme to affect emotional processing

first_imgEmail Share LinkedIn New research provides evidence that experiences of early life stress are associated with atypical responses towards emotional facial expressions in adulthood. The findings have been published in the journal Development and Psychopathology.“One of the things that drives me as a researcher is how we can improve the experiences of people with mental illness, by developing better treatments and clearer knowledge of these health conditions,” explained Elizabeth Kirkham (@EK_Neuro), a research associate at the University of Edinburgh and the corresponding author of the study.“Early life stress and trauma are a huge factor in the development of mental illness later in life – I think society in general is still not aware of how close the relationship between early stress and later health (mental and physical) really is. If we can understand more about early life stress then we can understand more about how mental illness develops, which in turn will help us find better ways of reducing the suffering of people living with mental health conditions.” Share on Twittercenter_img In the study, 395 participants completed the Child Abuse and Trauma Scale after being shown photographs depicting angry, happy, and neutral facial expressions. The participants indicated the extent to which they would approach the person in the image and the extent to which they would avoid the person.The researchers found that participants who experienced more stressful life events in childhood and adolescence tended to be less avoidant of people with angry facial expressions.“Our results were surprising — that early life stress is associated with reduced, not increased, avoidance of anger in people with no signs of mental ill health. This is the opposite of what we expected,” Kirkham told PsyPost.But Kirkham said the findings indicate that early life stress “doesn’t have to be extreme to affect emotional processing. Very few of the people in our study had histories of extreme trauma or neglect, yet the stress that they did experience as children was linked to both their mental health and their responses to emotional information as adults.”“This is important when we think about our social environment — investing in the quality of children’s early life is likely to pay dividends later on in terms of the health of the wider society.”The relationship between early life stress and reduced avoidance of angry facial expressions was not found among participants who showed signs of depression and anxiety. More depressed participants, however, did tend to be more avoidant of happy facial expressions.“We were also surprised that that was no relationship between early life stress and avoidance of anger amongst people with evidence of mental illness, even though the expected relationship between depression and avoidance of happy facial expressions was present,” Kirkham said.“Therefore it’s important that additional work is carried out to examine what is going on here and why the effects of early life stress are different from what might have been predicted from previous research. I suspect it might be connected to the fact that previous research has focused on children with extreme early life stress, whereas we focused on adults with relatively low levels of early life stress.”“I’d be very happy to hear from researchers or students who share my interest in early life stress and its effects on the adult brain. There’s still a lot to be discovered within this field,” Kirkham added.The study, “Early life stress is associated with reduced avoidance of threatening facial expressions“, was authored by Elizabeth J. Kirkham and Liat Levita. Pinterest Share on Facebooklast_img read more

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New H7N9 cases in China include first in Jilin province

first_imgChina today reported four new H7N9 infections, one fatal, including the first case from Jilin province, which lies well north of the main outbreak area.Three of the latest illnesses are from Guangdong province, a hotspot of disease activity during the outbreak’s second wave. Patients include a 46-year-old woman and a 69-year-old man, both of whom are hospitalized, and a 64-year-old man who died from his infection, according to a provincial health ministry statement translated and posted by FluTrackers, an infectious disease news message board.The patient from Jilin province is a 50-year-old poultry farmer in the capital city of Changchun, according to a news report today in Chinese from Xinhua, China’s state news agency, that was translated and posted by FluTrackers. He is reportedly hospitalized in stable condition.Jilin province, located in northeastern China, borders North Korea and Russia. The area where the H7N9 case was detected is about 600 miles northeast of Beijing, the northernmost site where H7N9 cases have previously been detected. So today’s news of a case in Jilin represents an expansion of the outbreak area.The four new cases boost the outbreak total to 365, according to a case list kept by Flu Trackers. The latest death lifts the unofficial number of fatalities to 113.Over the past several days the second wave of infections has tapered off, after exceeding the last spring’s first wave. So far 229 H7N9 infections have been reported in the second wave, compared with 136 during the first.Researchers detail father-son case clusterIn other developments today, researchers from China reported on a family case cluster in Shandong province that occurred last April during the outbreak’s first wave. The team reported its findings in the latest online edition of BMC Infectious Diseases.The two sick family members were a 36-year-old father and his 4-year-old son. The man got sick first and was hospitalized with acute respiratory distress on Apr 21, followed by his son’s hospitalization a week later. Samples from both patients were positive for H7N9, and a genetic analysis found that the viruses were almost identical.An investigation into the sources of their illnesses found that the boy had significant unprotected exposure to his father while he was sick and that the two had not had contact with poultry, but had been near a poultry environment.The family lived in a rural-urban area of Zaozhaung, a city of 3.7 million in southern Shandong, near the border with Jiangsu province. Several live poultry in cages were located 10 meters (33 feet) from the family’s apartment, and two live poultry slaughtering sites were housed about a third of a mile  and about two thirds of a mile from their neighborhood.Two days before the father got sick, he had visited a village that had several large poultry farms, but he didn’t enter them. None of the family members had bought poultry at the local slaughter sites or had contact with any sick or dead poultry,Follow-up of 11 close contacts found no other H7N9 infections. Health officials collected 96 environmental samples, and only one yielded the virus: a swab taken from a chopping block at a live poultry market about 6 miles from where the family lived.Researchers concluded that the father’s infection probably resulted from contact with a contaminated environment and that the son was likely infected during prolonged unprotected exposure to his sick father, but they added that the environment or other sources can’t be excluded.The case fits with a risk assessment from the World Health Organization (WHO) that says the virus doesn’t transmit easily from human to human, but human-to-human transmission may have occurred when there was close unprotected contact with sick patients.See also:Feb 21 FluTrackers threadFluTrackers human H7N9 case countFeb 21 BMC Infect Dis abstractJan 21 WHO H7N9 risk assessmentlast_img read more

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Will valuation changes bring added value?

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Nel enters into contract for H2Station

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Pendennis Yard Development Project in Full Swing

first_imgSince Pendennis was founded twenty ‐ five years ago the shipyard has seen many changes as the facilities have continually improved, with the latest expansions set to be completed over the next 2 ‐ 3 years. This involves replacing the existing ‘White House’ and ‘Main Shed’ facilities with two 90m and one 45m seaward facing sheds. Additional trade workshops and crew office spaces are also part of the plan, with visiting yachts seeing the benefits as early as this autumn.Managing Director, Mike Carr, explained these most recent developments “Pendennis is currently one of Falmouth’s largest employers and we pride ourselves in being an ambassador for the strong maritime heritage of the area. With the refit side of the business continuing to perform well and enquiries increasing year on year the decision was made to further expand to retain our reputation as one of the world’s best custom build and superyacht refit yards. The quality of our workforce and variety in ‐ house skills makes us highly competitive in the international superyacht industry and we wanted the facilities to complement this ability and maintain our competitive advantage. These expansion plans will not only increase our project capacity, but has the potential to continue to grow and develop our workforce over the next 3 years.”Following the lengthy planning and approval process, multi‐million pound funding was secured through the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) Convergence programme and the Cornwall & Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership’s Growing Places Fund, and work on transforming the yard began in the New Year.Pendennis invited development partner companies, local dignitaries and key Falmouth partner organisations to celebrate as the first frame was raised on the new buildings. Under the first column two sovereigns were placed by Mrs. M. Carr and Mrs. N. Wiekens, mothers of Joint Managing Directors Mike Carr and Henk Wiekens, assisted by Jowan Notts and Myles Whitbread ‐ Jordan, both first year apprentices.Attending were representatives of ERDF Convergence, Local Enterprise Partnership, Cornwall Development Company, Cornwall Council, Ward Williams Associates and the build project team from Midas. Also present were Mayor Geoffrey Evans, local MP Sarah Newton, Port Pendennis Marina, World Fuels, and THL who all have strong links with Pendennis.Chris Pomfret, Chair of the LEP and Deputy Chair of the Convergence Local Management Committee, which steers the Convergence programme explained “Pendennis is a world leader in its field and epitomises what Cornwall has to offer in terms of competing on a global stage. I am delighted that both ERDF and the LEP led Growing Places Fund was able to support this project, which will not only allow Pendennis to grow and expand but will also provide highly skilled jobs to the area.”Progress on the new buildings will be rapid, with the three new sheds due to be finished by the end of 2013. Midas Construction Divisional Director Mike O’Neill said: “As a local contractor based in Cornwall, we are delighted to be working alongside Pendennis on this contract which will have such a significant impact on the local and regional economies. It is also good to be back working in Falmouth where Midas Construction has completed some really notable, landmark projects in recent years.”Phase One of these new construction halls will be habitable by October, in time for the winter refit season this year. The additional project offices and crew hospitality suites are scheduled for completion for Spring 2014.[mappress]Press Release, June 28, 2013; Image:last_img read more

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Veripos Appoints Business Development Manager for Scandinavia

first_imgDue to the continued growth of its Norwegian market, Veripos has appointed Thomas Skattum as Business Development Manager for the Scandinavia Region, responsible for all aspects of developing and securing new business for Veripos in all market sectors for customers based in this key region.Skattum joins Veripos from a role as a Sales Executive with Linak Norge. However, prior to this, Skattum had a long career with Fugro Seastar in Norway which he joined in 1998 and where he spent 14 years in various roles, latterly as Sales Executive for Fugro Seastar’s DP Services in Norway. Working in conjunction with the EAME Business Development team, Skattum will be based in Oslo and will report to Angus Scott, Vice President of EAME region.Commenting on the appointment Angus Scott said “Norway is a key growth area for Veripos, as it is the home base for many vessel owners, shipyards, DP system integrators and contractors in the seismic, construction, OSV and drilling sectors. The appointment of Thomas Skattum will help support our business development effort not only in Norway but also in the wider Scandinavian region where there are also good opportunities. Thomas brings a wealth of relevant experience and excellent industry knowledge and contacts and we are pleased to welcome him on-board.”Press Release, September 11, 2013last_img read more

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Vive la restoration: Sir Michael Latham on the importance of heritage stock

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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Lagging behind with tax returns

first_imgWorkers in the agriculture, fishing and forestry industries were better than lawyers at sending in their tax returns on time last year, HM Revenue & Customs reported. Overall 219 per 10,000 lawyers and accountants filed late self-assessment returns.last_img

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Tweeting train passengers update from the crowd

first_imgPASSENGER INFORMATION: A service alerting passengers to ‘crowd sourced’ information about train delays has been developed by Ben Smith, an IT consultant specialising in mobile technologies who commutes into London by rail. @uktrains provides news on disruption via the Twitter website, which allows people to publish 140 character messages. Exceptional snowfalls which brought much of London’s transport to a halt in February highlighted how passengers can report disruption faster than official sources, where the need for verification brings delays, and a surge in the need for information caused train operators’ websites to grind to a halt. Smith emphasises that the idea is not to replace detailed official information, but to offer ‘passive updates’ and ‘situational awareness’ keeping people informed of the general picture, rather than delays to specific trains. The first stage was to make it easy for people to access information — and Smith is highly critical of operators who impose restrictions on reuse of their service data or charge for access. The second stage was to open the system up to users. Passengers send reports to the service, which then makes their messages available to anyone who wants them. When delayed passengers see that official reports are out of date, they will respond to provide timely information. While social media is not to everyone’s taste, Smith argues that many people are using similar concepts in other aspects of their lives. They can cope with high volumes of data from a multitude of sources, and can understand that information may not be exactly correct, but what matters is the general picture: ‘Provide a feed, let the consumer filter it.’ Users can then check the official sources. ‘As a commuter I want to be informed. I don’t want to have to go through a website every time I’m about the leave the office’, says Smith. @uktrains ‘cost zero to set up, and zero to run.’ The information is out there, it doesn’t take a lot of effort or skill to make it available. ‘Why aren’t train operators trying to make my life easier?’last_img read more

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