Zimbra undergoes changes

first_imgSince spring break, Saint Mary’s students, faculty and staff have encountered more Zimbra outages, as the service experienced sporadic shortages and dysfunction. Similar shortages and minor outages have plagued the College since February. A major shortage occurred last month when Zimbra functioned unreliably for several days in a row. Once the email system began functioning properly again, the Department of Information Technology sent emails to students and faculty with advice on how to combat slow servers. Recommendations included emptying trash and junk folders regularly, limiting the number of attachments sent in emails and sending messages through Blackboard instead of Zimbra. Chief Information Officer [CIO] Michael Boehm said working through technical difficulties requires cooperation from everyone. “We can all do our part by lightening the load on the email server, which can only help with service,” he said. However, unresponsive servers continue to disrupt communication between students, professors and the College. Junior Annie Root said she recognizes the problems are not easy fixes, but she is frustrated with frequent technical difficulties. “I understand that Information Technology is working as diligently as possible to fix the problems, but it’s so frustrating to have Zimbra constantly out of service,” she said. “I rely on email to work on group projects and talk with my professors and for work. It’s aggravating to have Zimbra not work and slows my productivity.” Junior Meghan Feasel said Zimbra use is essential for everyday tasks, especially her job as an employee of the Alumnae Relations office. “We stay in contact with alumnae through emails. Therefore, our office runs mainly on Zimbra,” she said. “Lately, we haven’t been able to receive any emails. It’s not just frustrating, it’s detrimental.” In order to address these issues, Boehm said plans are in the works for improving Zimbra service in the immediate future. “In the short term, Information Technology has contracted with a Zimbra business partner for support, which will include an update to the software and remote monitoring and support,” he said. “This should resolve some of the issues that Zimbra continues to experience.” Some students have questioned whether Saint Mary’s should switch to another service provider. “I understand it isn’t an easy fix and the process is probably complicated, but I wish we would get rid of Zimbra and switch to [Google’s email service] Gmail,” Root said. “I think it would significantly improve things.” Although no email service change has been confirmed, Boehm said a switch could occur sometime in the future. While some students may support the implementation of Gmail, Information Technology is considering other options as part of its long-term goals to improve email services. “The College is investigating long-term solutions to improve email communication, which includes looking at a vendor other than Zimbra,” Boehm said. “As the CIO, I will lead the evaluation of the email system and the resolution efforts. Gmail is certainly an option.  We are looking at a number of products and vendors.”last_img read more

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The One. Now Available through Formigli Bikes

first_imgWant custom painted, matching bars and stem? Formigli can make it happen. The front of the One houses a 1 1/2″ to 1 1/8″ tapered steerer with a high modulus carbon fork. The One frame is constructed from T800 high modulus carbon fiber with a specialized lay up to offer both the stiffness and comfort Formigli was looking for. Calling it the highest performing and most comfortable bike Renzo has ever made, new carbon was employed to enable new shapes and tubes to create the bike. While the top tube and seatstays got smaller, the down tube and chainstays get bigger, all part of improving performance while smoothing out the ride.There is also the curved seat tube with an aerodynamic shape to both stiffen the frame and make it faster. The non integrated but proprietary seat post is included with the frame, and painted to match – naturally.Due to the custom nature of Formigli’s bikes, prices and geometries aren’t given. Have to know? Head over to Formigli and request a quote on a frameset or complete bike.Frame Specs: Are you looking for the One? Formigli thinks this is the one. The one road bike you need. It wasn’t long ago that Formigli was teasing their new One road bike, and as the company seldom releases new frames it’s a special occasion for fans of the brand, and custom carbon road bikes alike. Part aero road bike, part Gran Fondo bike, part race bike, Formigli claims the One offers a perfect blend of rigidity and comfort. As usual, the One is only offered as a made to order custom bike with your choice of colors in matte or glossy finish like the glossy McLaren F1 esque paint job above.More of the One, next.last_img read more

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EB14: A-Class Adds Disc Brake Road, Cyclocross Options & Wide New Antic MTB Wheels

first_imgA-Class, which is the upscale complete wheel side of Alex Rims’ business, had something new for road, cyclocross and mountain bikes, each aimed at satisfying the latest trends.The Graph50 is a 24mm wide (17.6mm inside) and 50mm deep full carbon clincher laced to disc brake hubs. Weight is 1460g for the set, available with standard quick release axles only.The new CXD4 disc brake cyclocross wheelset gets a sleeved, offset rim to even out spoke tension. Stainless steel spoke eyelets on the rim keep it strong and allow the nipples to seat easily and without binding. The front wheel comes with end caps for either 9mm QR or 15mm thru axle. Rear is QR only. It’s tubeless ready, with a shelf built into the bed’s profile to support tubeless tires properly. Rims are 24mm wide (19mm internal), 23mm deep and the set comes in at a claimed 1536g, almost 200g lighter than the original CXD5. The weight savings comes mainly from the rim – the CXD5 uses a pinned rim without the Equalizer asymmetric profile.More pics and details below, plus a look at their very, VERY wide new Antic gravity mountain bike wheels… The Graph50 wheelset is $1,499.99. Twenty four spokes with two-cross lacing front and rear should keep the wheels plenty stiff for aggressive cross riding.The CXD4 set is $599.99.The Antic is their new ultra-wide gravity wheelset with a welded rim, stainless spoke eyelets and a whopping 30mm inside width! Other dimensions are 35mm wide outside and 23mm deep. They’re laced 3x with 32 spokes per wheel.The front gets 15mm and 20mm thru axle options, the rear has 12×150 and 12×157, so it’s clearly aimed at longer travel bikes. Weights are 2,072g (26″) and 2,140g (650B). Word is they’ll also have a 29er version, but weights aren’t available for those yet. Retail is $599.99.AClass-Wheels.comlast_img read more

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My Fair Lady, Starring Lauren Ambrose, Officially Opens on Broadway

first_img© Justin “Squigs” Robertson Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on July 7, 2019 About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home. My Fair Lady Broadway’s highly anticipated new production of Lerner & Loewe’s My Fair Lady officially opens at Lincoln Center Theater’s Vivian Beaumont Theater on April 19. Tony winner Bartlett Sher directs and Tony winner Christopher Gattelli choreographs the revival, which began previews on March 15. Emmy nominee Lauren Ambrose stars in the iconic role of Eliza Doolittle.Adapted from George Bernard Shaw’s play and Gabriel Pascal’s motion picture Pygmalion, My Fair Lady features a book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe. The show boasts classic songs like “I Could Have Danced All Night,” “Get Me to the Church on Time,” “Wouldn’t It Be Loverly,” “On the Street Where You Live,” “The Rain in Spain” and “I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face.” Joining Ambrose in the principal cast are Harry Hadden-Paton making his New York stage debut as Henry Higgins, two-time Tony winner Norbert Leo Butz as Alfred P. Doolittle, Tony winner Diana Rigg as Mrs. Higgins, Allan Corduner as Colonel Pickering, Linda Mugleston as Mrs. Pearce, Jordan Donica as Freddy Eynsford-Hill and Manu Narayan as Zoltan Karpathy.To celebrate the new revival, Broadway.com Resident Artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson sketched a portrait of the company serving up a fresh take on a musical classic. View Commentslast_img read more

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Keiths II opens in Rutland

first_imgPictured front row left to rightTom Donahue, Executive Vice President/CEO, Rutland Region Chamber of CommerceChristopher Robinson, Rutland City Board of AldermanLyndsay Donahue, Bayada Home Health CareMarleen Cenate, President, Rutland Region Chamber of CommerceVermont Governor Peter ShumlinRutland City Mayor Christopher Louras  Cal Lanfear, Keiths IIBrennan Duffy, Executive Director, Rutland Redevelopment AuthoritySteve Senecal, Keiths IIDan Keith, Keiths IIJerry Hansen, Board of Directors, Rutland Region Chamber of Commerce The ribbon is cut at the new retail and manufacturing location for Keiths II, located at 15 West Street, in Rutland. Keiths II has transformed the former Armory building into a state of the art manufacturing and retail space while maintaining the historic aspects of the building. Keiths II is holding an Open House at their new location throughout the month of March. You can stop by and check out the new retail store, free Keith’ s II t-shirt with purchase (while supplies last). The Rutland Region Chamber of Commerce Ribbon Cutting Celebration was attended by Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin, several members of the Vermont Legislature and local officials including Mayor Christopher Louras.last_img read more

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Vermont Secretary of State’s 2016 poster and essay contest deadline May 1

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The Vermont Secretary of State’s Poster and Essay Contest is an annual event to promote awareness of Vermont history, the Vermont Constitution, and the importance of civics among students in Grades K-12. The program was started in 2000, making this its 16th year. The essay topics this year, for older students, focus on youth involvement in politics and governance and asks students to imagine creative ways in which we can encourage and increase their participation. The younger students, in keeping with tradition, are asked to create their own rendition of state symbols and posters by thinking about what Vermont means to them.Every year, we receive great submissions from students across the state. We then select winners in each category and invite their entire class to join us for a day in Montpelier where they tour the State House, the Vermont History Museum, and are recognized in an awards ceremony.We ask teachers to share this opportunity with their students and encourage them to participate. The deadline for submissions is May 1. We are excited to see what new and thoughtful submissions we receive this year from our talented Vermont students!More information about the contest, the class topics, and submission forms can be found attached with this press release and on our website.last_img read more

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Underlying psychological traits could explain why political satire tends to be liberal

first_img“Everywhere I went, I was asked this question, and I had never been satisfied with my response. Digging into the literature on the psychological profiles of liberals and conservatives opened a window into a new explanatory mechanism – that the ‘liberal bias’ of satire does not stem from the content, target, or function of those jokes, but rather from the rhetorical structure of humor itself – especially in the case of irony.”In the study, 305 participants watched and evaluated a series of jokes about a variety of apolitical topics. For each topic, the researchers crafted two types of joke: one version used irony to humorous effect, while the other used exaggeration.For example, some participants viewed this irony-based joke:The other participants viewed this exaggeration-based joke:After evaluating the jokes, the participants then completed measures of need for cognition, tolerance for ambiguity, need to evaluate, sense of humor, and political ideology.Young and her colleagues found that more conservative participants tended to show less appreciation of both forms of jokes.This relationship was partially explained by need for cognition and sense of humor. In other words, conservatives tended to agree with statements such as “I only think as hard as I have to” and “People who tell jokes are a pain in the neck,” which in turn was associated with less positive evaluations of the jokes.“The study provides empirical evidence that conservatives and liberals differ in their appreciation and comprehension of humor, especially in the case of irony. Even when the subject matter is not political at all, conservatives are less appreciative of incongruity-based humorous texts than liberals are,” Young told PsyPost.“This difference is due in part to the fact that liberals and conservatives have different underlying psychological and personality traits that shape how they interact with messages in the environment. Liberals tend to be higher in need for cognition.”“They are also more likely to value the production and consumption of humor in general. In this study, both of these traits accounted — in part — for liberals’ higher appreciation of both irony and exaggeration, compared to conservatives.”The study — like all research — includes some limitations. Though need for cognition explains some of the relationship, “much of the impact of conservatism on humor appreciation remains unaccounted for,” the researchers said.It is also possible that the format of the jokes reminded participants of The Daily Show, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, or Saturday Night Live‘s Weekend Update.“It is very possible that the format and visual cue of the comic behind a desk signaled to conservative viewers that this content was similar in spirit and intent to that of late-night comedy (hence, it may have been perceived as left-leaning even though the jokes were not political),” Young said.“This might explain conservatives’ lower appreciation of the content. Future research could explore various novel formats to avoid that confound.”The study, “Psychology, Political Ideology, and Humor Appreciation: Why Is Satire So Liberal?” was authored by Dannagal G. Young, Benjamin E. Bagozzi, Abigail Goldring, Shannon Poulsen, and Erin Drouin. Share on Twitter Share Share on Facebook The need for cognition — a psychological term used to describe the enjoyment of thinking and analyzing problems — could help explain the differences in humor appreciation between liberals and conservatives.According to new research in Psychology of Popular Media Culture, political conservatives tend to score lower on a measure of need for cognition, which is related to their lack of appreciation for irony and exaggeration.“Having studied the content, effects, and psychological processing of political humor and satire for 20 years, I could never escape the question of why political satire tends to be liberal,” said study author Dannagal G. Young, an associate professor at the University of Delaware and author of the forthcoming book Irony and Outrage: The Polarized Landscape of Rage, Fear, and Laughter in the United States.center_img Email LinkedIn Pinterestlast_img read more

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UK study deems 20% of primary care antibiotics inappropriate

first_imgAt least 20% of all antibiotics prescribed in UK primary care could be classified as inappropriate, according to new research published by Public Health England (PHE).The research appears in a study published yesterday in a special supplement of the Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, along with four other studies on the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing in English primary care. Those studies found that more than two thirds of antibiotic prescriptions were linked to conditions of the respiratory tract and urinary tract infections, but in a third of all prescriptions no clinical justification was documented.Respiratory conditions, including sore throat, cough, sinusitis, and ear infection, had the most inappropriate prescriptions.While the amount of inappropriate prescribing varied widely, all practices included in the analysis were found to prescribe antibiotics when they weren’t necessary. The authors of the study say this suggests that all practices in England have the potential to reduce antibiotic prescribing without withholding antibiotics for those patients who truly need them.In 2016, the British government called for cutting the amount of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing by general practitioners (GPs) in half by 2020. The authors say that, to meet that goal, they first needed to quantify the extent of the problem.A similar study was conducted in 2016 by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with the same purpose. That study found that approximately 30% of all oral antibiotics prescribed in US outpatient settings are inappropriate.Based on the findings of the new study, total antibiotic prescribing in English primary care would need to be reduced by 10% to meet the UK government’s goal, PHE officials say.      “This publication highlights the role GPs can play, and I urge all practices to look at ways they can reduce their inappropriate prescribing levels to help make sure the antibiotics that save lives today can save lives tomorrow,” PHE medical director Paul Cosford, MB BS, said in a PHE press release.Identifying inappropriate prescribingFor the study, PHE researchers analyzed antibiotic prescribing data from 2013 through 2015 recorded in The Health Improvement Network (THIN), a primary care electronic database that contains the electronic medical records of more than 11 million UK patients. They identified inappropriate prescribing events by comparing prescriptions against treatment guidelines, comparing the actual proportions of GP consultations that resulted in a prescription with the ideal proportions derived from expert opinion, and identifying high prescribers and variations in prescribing practices.The researchers then used three different levels of estimates for inappropriate prescribing. The most conservative scenario was based on the most generous estimates of antibiotic appropriateness from the experts, while the least conservative scenario was based on the strictest estimates of the experts. A middle scenario split the difference.Overall, data on more than 3.7 million prescriptions from 260 (74.5%) out of 349 English primary care practices that contributed to THIN during the study period were included for analysis. Only 22.6% of these prescriptions could be identified as appropriate or inappropriate; others couldn’t be analyzed because they were not covered by guidelines or there wasn’t enough information about the patients or their symptoms. More than 33% couldn’t be assessed because they lacked an informative diagnostic code.Under the most conservative scenario, 8.8% of all antibiotic prescriptions during the study period were classified as inappropriate. Under the least conservative scenario, 23.1% of prescriptions were considered inappropriate, and 15.4% were considered inappropriate under the middle scenario.In addition, inappropriate prescribing was identified in all included practices, ranging from a minimum of 3.6% of a practice’s prescriptions in the most conservative scenario to as high as 52.9% in the least conservative scenario. No relationship between the practices’ antibiotic prescribing rates and their proportions of inappropriate prescriptions was found.Unsurprisingly, the conditions found to contribute most to inappropriate prescribing were respiratory illnesses, which are typically caused by viruses but are frequently targets of unnecessary prescribing. In the middle scenario, these conditions included sore throat (23% of all identified inappropriate prescriptions), cough (22.2%), sinusitis (7.6%), and acute otitis media in patients between 6 months and 18 years old (5.7%). These rankings remained the same in the other scenarios.In another analysis in the supplement that looked at antibiotic consultations, the researchers found that most primary care practices in England prescribe considerably more antibiotics for several selected conditions than would be expected based on guidelines and expert opinion. For example, an antibiotic was prescribed in 41% of all acute cough consultations, when the “ideal” prescribing rate for that condition would be 10%. The difference between actual and ideal prescribing was even more pronounced for rhinosinusitis (82% vs. 11%), acute otitis media (88% vs. 17%), acute bronchitis (82% vs. 13%), and acute sore throat (59% vs. 13%).Even though only 22% of the prescriptions could be classified as appropriate or inappropriate, the authors of the study say their research indicates the existence of “substantial inappropriate antibiotic prescribing” and the potential for reductions. “The real reduction potential is probably higher, and it is important to note that the totality of inappropriate prescribing is a moving target that may change with better data, new specific insights, and novel diagnostic tools becoming available,” they write.Improved documentation, better diagnostic toolsIn an accompanying commentary, Dame Sally Davies, the chief medical officer for England, noted that the findings were discussed at a joint PHE/Department of Health workshop and that a consensus was reached that at least 20% of antibiotic prescriptions in English primary care are currently inappropriate. But she thinks that estimate is likely conservative, and she says the PHE analysis indicates that efforts to reduce inappropriate prescribing should be made throughout primary care.Efforts to pick some of the low-hanging fruit have already begun. In January, PHE and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) issued new guidance advising against the use of antibiotics in most cases of acute sore throat.Davies would also like to see England aim higher than a 10% reduction in primary care antibiotic prescribing. By comparison, Belgium is aiming to reduce the number of antibiotic prescriptions by at least 25% by 2020, while the Netherlands is aiming for a 45% reduction by 2020.”As microorganisms do not respect borders, we can only tackle this if every country and sector plays its part in full,” Davies writes.Achieving those kind of reductions in England, Davies says, will require improved documentation for why antibiotics are being prescribed, along with reliable point-of-care tests and diagnostic tools that can help clinicians identify those who are most likely to benefit from the drugs.See also:Feb 27 J Antimicrob Chemother supplementFeb 27 J Antimicrob Chemother commentaryFeb 27 PHE press releaselast_img read more

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East Penn Names Metzger Sales Manager Automotive Cables and Diversified Products

first_imgDeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement LYON STATION, PA — East Penn Manufacturing Company recently announced the promotion of Pharon L. Metzger from assistant sales manger to sales manager automotive cables and diversified products. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementMetzger will assume responsibility for the sales, marketing and management of East Penn’s diversified products to the company’s national account base. He will also continue to manage and promote sales through the company’s independent rep agencies. Metzger joined East Penn after graduating from Moravian College in 1987 as sales trainee. Since then he has been promoted to route salesman, city salesman, district manager and his most recent position as assistant manager automotive cables and diversified products. _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain.last_img read more

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Primary Health to raise £38.6m for expansion

first_imgThe healthcare property investor, which was one of the nine listed companies to convert into a REIT on 1 January, is carrying out a placing and open offer of 9.3m shares at 430p each, which is underwritten by Numis Securities.The share issue coincided with the company’s half-year results to 31 December 2006, which showed a 7% increase in net asset value to 421p a share. Pretax profits were down 4% to £9m.The purchase in December of Cathedral Healthcare added nine properties valued at £30.9m, which increased the size of Primary Health’s portfolio to £260m. ‘’The first half of our financial year has started strongly with all of our key performance indicators rising,’ said managing director Harry Hyman.last_img read more

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