People with low self-esteem tend to seek support in ways that backfire, study finds

first_imgShare on Facebook Share Share on Twitter Pinterest People with low self-esteem are more likely to seek support from an intimate partner in a manner that tends to backfire, according to new research in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.“We were interested in studying social support seeking because a large body of research demonstrates that social support has important consequences for mental, physical, and relational well-being, but only a few studies had previously examined the determinants of how people seek social support,” said study author Brian P. Don of Clackamas Community College.“By drawing on self-esteem to understand the roots of support seeking behavior, this study makes an important advancement in understanding why people are sometimes unsuccessful in their attempts to seek support from intimate partners.”center_img LinkedIn Email The researchers were particularly interested in a phenomenon known as indirect support seeking — meaning sulking, whining, fidgeting, and/or displaying sadness to elicit support. People are believed to engage in this type of indirect communication because they fear being rejected.In two studies, with 176 couples in total, the researchers found that those with lower self-esteem were more likely to engage in indirect support seeking. This type of support seeking was, in turn, associated with a greater chance of a partner responding with criticism, blame, or disapproval.Those with low self-esteem — but not those with high self-esteem — also viewed their partner as less responsive to their needs when they responded negatively to their support seeking.“People with low self-esteem tend to seek support in ways that actually hinder their partner’s ability to provide support, which in turn has detrimental consequences for how support seekers feel about the relationship,” Don told PsyPost. “Theoretically, this occurs because people who are low in self-esteem tend to be wary of social rejection, but this fear of rejection ironically results in behaviors that tend to elicit the very rejection that people who are low in self-esteem fear.”“One caveat is that, although the pattern of findings was consistent across both studies, the results did not fully replicate for all of the paths we tested. Thus, future work should look to continue to replicate these findings,” Don added. “Given that support seeking is a relatively unexplored area, there are many questions still left to be tested, like how the support provider’s self-esteem may play a role in this process.”The study, “Low Self-Esteem Predicts Indirect Support Seeking and Its Relationship Consequences in Intimate Relationships“, was authored by Brian P. Don, Yuthika U. Girme, and Matthew D. Hammond.last_img read more

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Ebola region rocked by more violence as new funds announced

first_imgYesterday the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF), a rebel group, attacked two villages near Beni, killing 12 people who live in the heart of the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s (DRC’s) ongoing Ebola outbreak.The terrorists killed nine in Eringeti and three in Oicha, according to Reuters. ADF has not publically pledged allegiance to the Islamic state (ISIL), but that hasn’t stopped ISIL from claiming responsibility for the attacks.The violence comes as two major donors announced added funding of response efforts.Series of violenceThe attacks are just the latest in a series of violent offensives launched by militant groups in the DRC’s North Kivu and Ituri provinces. The provinces are home to more than 1 million displaced persons and dozens of paramilitary and terrorist groups. Throughout the year-long battle against Ebola, violent attacks have shortly been followed by a spike in cases as the attacks temporarily halt disease surveillance and vaccination efforts.The violence has also caused international actors, including the United States and Doctors without Borders, to remove or relocate health workers in the region for security reasons.Today the United Nations’ Stabilization Mission (MONUSCO) said groups like the ADF and the Mai-Mai, have created a “deadly environment” for responders, who have been both threatened and killed, UN News reported.”I am concerned with the current situation in Ituri province, where spoilers are seeking to play on ethnic tensions to instigate inter-community violence,” said Leila Zerrougui, the head of MONUSCO, in remarks made at a security meeting earlier today. Attacks by the ADF “continue to exact an intolerable toll on civilians.”World Bank, USAID increase fundingToday the World Bank Group announced an additional $300 million to help scale up response efforts in the DRC.”The communities and health workers on the front line of this outbreak urgently need more support and resources from the international community to prevent this crisis from worsening inside the country and from spreading across borders,” said World Bank CEO Kristalina Georgieva.According to the World Bank, the money will cover the Ebola-affected health zones in DRC and enable the government, World Health Organization (WHO), UNICEF, World Food Programme, International Organization for Migration, and other responders to step up the frontline health response.Also today, the US Agency for International Development (USAID) announced an additional $38 million for the outbreak, which includes $15 million directed toward the WHO. USAID has given $136 million to the outbreak since August of 2018.”The DRC has fought and controlled nine other outbreaks of Ebola successfully, with the help of the international community; however, this response has a unique set of obstacles because of the ongoing conflict in North Kivu and Ituri Provinces,” USAID said in a press release.”Continuing insecurity and difficulty in earning community trust are major hurdles. A robust, unified response by the Government of the DRC, the United Nations, other neighboring countries, the United States, and the international community in partnership with local communities is critical to stopping the spread of the disease.”Cases top 2,600According to the latest numbers on the WHO’s online Ebola dashboard, there are 15 newly confirmed cases today, raising outbreak totals to 2,612.For the second day in a row, DRC officials have provided no update on the outbreak, including statistics on the number of deaths, health workers infected, or suspected cases. Earlier this week, Oly Ilunga Kalenga, MD, the DRC’s health minister, resigned following the DRC president’s decision to move outbreak response management to a government expert committee.See also:Jul 24 Reuters storyJul 24 UN News storyJul 24 World Bank press releaseJul 24 USAID press releaseWHO Ebola dashboardlast_img read more

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Scotland’s new planning regime

first_imgSource: Richard Cassidy/ ShutterstockEdinburgh: affordable housing requirements will rise from 25% to 35% under the Edinburgh Choices for City Plan 2030Edinburgh and Glasgow have both set ambitious climate targets that developers will have to meet if they want planning permission. The country’s capital is also considering introducing affordable housing targets that could see current requirements jump from 25% to 35%. And planning fees are set to double as Scotland’s national planning bill — passed into law last summer — comes into force.So what exactly do the changes entail and how will they impact the property industry?The proposal that has received the most vocal opposition from the property industry is outlined in Edinburgh’s Choices for City Plan 2030.The plan to increase the provision of affordable housing requirement from 25% to 35%, which is in consultation until the end of this month, would affect all residential developments – including conversions – featuring more than 12 residential units.Opponents fear it will hinder rather than help the city deliver the right level of affordable housing.“It’s all about viability,” says Will Scarlett, founder and director of Scarlett Land and Development. “If you’ve got to provide 35% affordable housing, your BTR development is less viable.”Scarlett and his firm have been working with developers including Platform_, S1 Developments and Legal & General, as well as Summix Capital Limited on a variety of BTR and purpose-built student accommodation (PBSA) schemes.“As far as BTR is concerned, we want to continue the momentum and positive work that has been achieved over the past two years,” says Scarlett.In those two years, BTR has emerged as “a key new residential use class” in Scotland, according to Rettie & Co. The firm’s latest research shows that in Edinburgh and Glasgow, the BTR pipeline grew 13% between spring and autumn last year to more than 5,900 units.“This is driven by a rising rental market and socioeconomic changes, in the overall context of weak housing supply,” the firm says.Under pressureNew affordable housing requirements are “going to remove some of that momentum and it’s going to put viability under pressure once again,” says Scarlett. “BTR viability should not be taken for granted.”Increasing the affordable housing provision “has significant implications for our industry,” agrees Robin Blacklock, chair of the Scottish Property Federation and managing director at the BTR specialist Dowbrae Property Consultancy.“It’s restricting the rate of development. BTR could be a significant factor in delivering more homes more quickly,” he explains.Both Blacklock and Scarlett say housing and affordable housing targets in Edinburgh could be revised upward after the Scottish government took control of them under the new Planning (Scotland) 2019 Bill it passed last summer.For the first time, the central government will now set the goals all local authorities in Scotland need to meet.The targets have not yet been released and consultations are ongoing as the government drafts the fourth National Planning Framework (NPF4).Edinburgh City Council has pledged to deliver 20,000 affordable homes by 2026, but Scarlett and Blacklock say development could slow if projects aren’t viable.Edinburgh’s council did not respond to questions about the impact its affordable housing requirements would have on meeting these targets.Affordable housingKevin Smith SMP, Scotland’s planning minister, says “it would not be appropriate for us to say anything” about the council’s proposal to hike affordable housing, lest it “prejudice” the process. He points out that during the current parliamentary period, the government will invest £225m in affordable housing in Edinburgh.The council’s policy proposals will also impact PBSA. The plans would make it statutory for new PBSA developments with sites larger than 0.62 acres to reserve 50% of their plans for housing – with hotels, short-stay commercial accommodation, other commercial business, retail and leisure developments also affected. On top of that, only 10% of PBSA developments would be allowed to be studio flats.“Why control the mix if there’s market demand for studio flats?” asks Scarlett. “The other issue with that is you’re going to have schemes coming forward where residential owner-occupiers are living cheek by jowl with students. It can work, but is that what people want?”Property industry representatives say the policies could lead Edinburgh to under-deliver on its housing targets by deterring developers and investors from building schemes there because they aren’t financially viable.The Scottish government has a substantial amount of work to undertakeTony Aitken, Colliers International“As an industry, we understand what they’re trying to achieve,” says Blacklock, “but it could have unintended consequences”.Consultation on the overall housing targets local authorities will need to meet is scheduled to wrap up at the end of March. A draft document is expected in September, ahead of the policy’s adoption in 2021.“This presents an opportunity to streamline planning for housing and to create a consistent and transparent platform that can free up planning authorities and stakeholders to focus on delivery and the creation of quality places,” says Stewart.These consultations demonstrate 2020 is all about “putting the meat on the bones” of the planning bill, says Tony Aitken, head of planning at Colliers international. “The Scottish government has a substantial amount of work to undertake,” he says and the bill “brings substantive changes in planning.”Emissions reductionAnother of those changes surrounds the Scottish government looking at options to “radically accelerate the reduction of carbon emissions,” says Stewart. The new national planning framework will outline how developments will contribute to meeting Scotland’s climate targets.“Until it is adopted, it won’t affect existing developments, but once adopted it will form the key basis on which planning decisions are made,” says Stewart.Scotland has committed to reaching net-zero carbon emissions by 2045, and language in the 2019 planning bill indicates new developments will need to be in line with those commitments.On top of that, Glasgow and Edinburgh are battling each other to be the UK’s first city to hit net-zero carbon emissions. Last year, Edinburgh City Council pledged that the capital will become carbon-neutral by 2030 and in its policy proposals, the local authority says it wants “all buildings through their design and the use of low and zero-carbon generating technologies to be carbon-neutral”.Carbon neutrality “will loom large in the national planning framework,” believes Colliers’ Aitken, who states some “not insignificant schemes” in the planning appeal process would not be up to standard.Demand for buildings to meet these standards is also coming from tenants at the moment, says Simon Capaldi, a partner specialising in occupier services at Knight Frank in Edinburgh. “Larger corporates all have green clauses in their lease,” he says, noting developers and landlords will need to deliver one way or another.Whether it is the tenants, developers or landlords, someone is going to have to pay for the delivery of these greener buildings, says Scarlett.“Everyone is signed up to the need to reduce carbon emissions – but it will come at a price,” he points out. “Either the end-user pays for it, or the developer with a reduced margin, or the landowner.”Planning fees hikeIn addition to these concerns, planning fees are set to double in Scotland under the planning bill. In mid-February, consultation ended on the performance of Scotland’s planning system and fees.In 2017, the maximum planning fee was increased to £125,000 and this is now set to double to £250,000, says Aitken, who notes that “in certain parts of Scotland, such as areas where building is less commercially viable, it could have an impact”.Aitken and other industry representatives say they want those fees ring-fenced by the government so local authorities are required to plough the money back into improvements in the planning system and the processes that grease the gears of planning approvals. The fact it isn’t right now is “the bit that’s unpalatable to developers,” he says.In a letter submitted to the government as part of its consultation the SPF wrote: “SPF members have previously indicated a willingness to pay a higher planning fee for a tangible improvement in performance by planning authorities. Unfortunately, we have yet to see full commitment by planning authorities to tie fees to better outcomes in the way that’s needed.”Members of the SPF will learn if the government has heard their concerns when the draft policy is released in May or June.The fees hike, requirements for new buildings and development to meet climate standards and new affordable housing requirements are just a few of the major policy changes that are being hammered out and put into place this year. The Scottish property industry will be maintaining a watching brief to see how things pan out.last_img read more

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Feature articles in the January 2017 issue of Railway Gazette International

first_imgFeature articles in the latest issue of Railway Gazette International, the leading business journal for railway operators and suppliers, read in 140 countries. Subscribe to Railway Gazette International today. Comment The end of the beginning News Main Line Urban Rail Market Industry Innovations Pointers Analysis DSB seeks to close ‘an unhappy chapter’ when it phases out IC4 DMUs, FRA reports uneven progress in Positive Train Control implementation, Moving the economy forward in AustraliaEurope Fourth Railway Package clears the last hurdleThe European Parliament voted on December 14 to approve the final wording for the market pillar of the Fourth Railway Package. Murray Hughes reports from Brussels Open access gains groundInter-city open access passenger trains in Europe remain the exception rather than the rule, but new entrants established on busy corridors are spreading their wings. Murray Hughes investigates A brighter future at nightAustrian Federal Railways has bucked the European trend of shrinking night train services by growing its offering, launching six new routes on December 11 under the Nightjet brand. Long-Distance Passenger Director Kurt Bauer explains the operator’s strategy to Nick Kingsley China targets an eastern gatewayWork is about to get underway on a Chinese-backed upgrading of the Beograd – Budapest corridor, representing one of the largest rail infrastructure projects in eastern Europe Track design Matching ballastless track with bridge structuresNew codes and standards will make it possible to eliminate rail expansion devices for continuous welded rail on many long bridges, making the use of ballastless trackforms more economical for high speed lines in particular Taking trams across the RheinNovel expansion joints have been developed to help carry an extension of the Strasbourg light rail network over the River Rhein to the German town of Kehl Ticketing & fare collection Towards mobility as a serviceTrain operators have yet to grasp the potential of a truly digitally enabled passenger experience, argues David Pitt of transaction technology specialist SilverRail In focus Myanma Railways moves from expansion to consolidationFaced with a dramatic drop in both traffic and revenue, Myanma Railways is concentrating on a few key investment projects as it seeks to consolidate its core network. Peter Janssen reports from Yangon Research & skills Joint research centre opens in Qingdao, Australian young professionals pitch innovation ideas Forum People Dieter Sidetrack Diary Viewpoint Rail Supply Industry WatchThe economic outlook for the next year is mixed, as the global economy is likely to suffer from the suspension of trade agreements and major political conflicts have not been resolved. We asked our panel of industry executives about their expectations for business in 2017 Railway Gazette International is the leading business journal for railway operators and suppliers, read in 140 countries. Subscribe to Railway Gazette International today.last_img read more

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African Fashion displayed at Fashion Fest

first_imgEntertainmentLocalNews African Fashion displayed at Fashion Fest by: Dominica Vibes News – May 23, 2015 202 Views   no discussions Share Share Sharecenter_img Tweet Sharing is caring! As part of Africa Day Celebrations 2015, six (6) fashion designers collaborated to host an Afrika Fashion Fest at the Harlem Plaza in Newtown, Roseau on Friday 22 May 2015.The designers; Nisha, Kimra, Glenda, Nelly, Alice and Spacks Boutique, showcased their colorful African pieces, for both males and females, adorned by both Dominican and African models.The Fashion Night was held to also showcase the designs available for purchase for the national Africa Dress Day scheduled for Friday 29 May.– / 34last_img read more

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CCJ judge surprised by ‘light’ caseload

first_imgNewsRegional CCJ judge surprised by ‘light’ caseload by: – May 18, 2017 93 Views   no discussions Share Share Sharecenter_img Tweet Sharing is caring! KINGSTOWN, St Vincent (CMC) — A judge with the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) has expressed “surprise” at the court’s “light” caseload in its original jurisdiction, 12 years after it was established.“After 12 years, it is a little surprising that the court’s original jurisdiction caseload is still as light as it is,” Justice Adrian Saunders said in Kingstown on Tuesday.“In the appellate jurisdiction, the court has delivered over 140 or so judgements but we have heard less than a dozen cases and delivered about 20 judgements in the original jurisdiction,” he said.Saunders’ comments came as he delivered a lecture entitled “The Treaty of Chaguaramas: Conflicts and Contradictions for the Island State”.The lecture is part of the “Issues in International Affairs Lecture Series” organised by the University of the West Indies Open Campus in Kingstown, the Eastern Caribbean Supreme Court and Legalease SVG Inc.Saunders said the flow of cases that relate to the treaty – which established the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) – is “very sluggish”.“The question is why. I can only hazard a few guesses,” Saunders said, adding that he thinks many companies and persons who are prejudiced by the unlawful conduct of CARICOM members states still feel constrained to rely on the delinquent member state for a host of things.These range from the expeditious and favourable processing of licences, to direct business opportunity.“They prefer, therefore, to suffer in silence rather than displeasing a government and possibly losing business by bringing legal proceedings.”The judge said that there was actually a litigant who gave evidence to this effect to the court.“He said there are other actions that he could bring but if he did so, he believes that spiteful measure would be taken against him.”Saunders said that another issue is that in its original jurisdiction, the CCJ applies the rules of international law.“And the vast majority of lawyers in private practise are not experienced in this branch of the law. Many of them have never even read the treaty and they are, therefore, unable or reluctant to advise their clients to institute cases in the original jurisdiction.”Another consideration is that the vast majority of CARICOM nationals are still ignorant about their rights that proceed from the treaty and about the role of the court in vindicating those rights, Saunders said.On the issue of sensitisation, he noted that when the court was established in 2005, it seems that CARICOM could not afford to concentrate anymore of its slender resources in widespread public education about these matters.“In the court’s early years, it attempted itself to do some of this work and judges of the court went to various member states and conducted public education sessions about the treaty and the rights of CARICOM citizens and the role of the court, Saunders said.“But, interestingly, when we embarked upon our first strategic plan, our stakeholders told us in no uncertain terms that they didn’t consider it seemly that the judges of the court should be doing this kind of public relations work. And so we have cut back considerable on it.”The judge said that the case of Jamaican Shanique Myrie — who won a lawsuit against the Barbados government — the public spiritedness of a few Jamaican lawyers who were willing to work pro bono for her, “have demonstrated that with courage, with an abiding faith in the legal system, it is possible to take on a member stage and to secure justice”.The CCJ awarded Myrie US$38,000 after she sued the Barbados government, claiming she was subjected to a dehumanising cavity search by a female immigration officer at Grantley Adams International Airport, locked in a filthy room overnight and deported to Jamaica in March 2011.Regarding what he finds most significant about the original jurisdiction and the court’s role as the guardian of the treaty, Saunders said: “I would say, without hesitation, that despite the fact that only four countries have acceded to the appellate jurisdiction, despite the challenges we experience, in securing law and order in the region, despite everything you see and hear about the justice system in the region, what impresses me most is that the governments in the region have demonstrated the utmost respect for the court and its judgement.”He said that after the Myrie decision, CARICOM governments re-examined their protocols relating to admission of entry of CARICOM nationals and made alterations to those protocols to confirm with the prescriptions of the court.The same thing happened when the court decided a case against CARICOM itself, Saunders said.“Every single judgement of the court has ben fully complied with,” Saunders said, noting among them, that Myrie was paid her damages in full by the Barbados government.In 2001, Caribbean Community (CARICOM) countries established the CCJ to replace the London-based Privy Council as the region’s final court.But so far only Barbados, Belize, Dominica and Guyana have signed on to the Appellate Jurisdiction of the CCJ, even though most of the 15-member grouping are signatories to the Original Jurisdiction of the CCJ that also serves as an international tribunal interpreting the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas that governs the integration movement.last_img read more

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Ilongga MVP in Alabang taekwondo contest

first_imgAngela Joy Bermejo, a native of Miagao, Iloilo, made history in the 5th Women’s Martial Arts Festival in Ermita, Manila for being the first Ilongga to join and win a gold medal in the tournament. PHOTO FROM ANGELA BERMEJO’S FACEBOOK PAGE MANILA – Taekwondo jins from Iloilo showed their might during the Smart MVP Best of the Best Taekwondo Championships 2018 at the Ayala Malls South Park in Alabang, Muntinlupa City.Angela Joy Marie Bermejo from the Denmark V. Pinggol stable shone the brightest – she was hailed as Most Valuable Player after capturing a gold medal in kyorugi on Sunday.Jamie Hannah Agaloos of the Negros Taekwondo Union-Tigers stable was the lone gold medal winner from Bacolod City. She topped the poomsae event.Bermejo’s teammate Cyd Edryc Esmaña took home two medals – a silver in individual poomsae and a bronze in the group event along with Niesha Karin Pequierda and Elizabeth Marie Borres. Angelie Marie Perillo of the A. Diasnes stable had two bronze medals – one in female individual poomsae and another in the team event with Cindy Joy Diasnes and Sophia Marie Tungala.Qualifying to the finals of individual poomsae were Pequierda, Borres, Antonio Miguel Nafarrete, Alfie Diasnes, and Kean Ryth Bornazal. Bornazal also qualified to the finals of kyorugi.Reaching all the way to the quarterfinals were Ronald Kyle Pico, Joshua Grecia, Xyrus Andrei Desierto, Raphael Lloyd Pico, Senddrick Valencia, Joshua Cachero, and Roices Dane Decafe./PNlast_img read more

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Sabotase Sistem Sinyal, Ribuan Penumpang Chennai Metro Rail Limited Terbengkalai

first_img(The Hindu) Gangguan persinyalan pada hari Senin dan Selasa di Chennai, India terjadi karena aksi pemokogan oleh staf, ribuan penumpang Chennai Metro Rail Limited (CMRL) harus merasakan penderitaan. Pasalnya selain mogok, dua karyawan membuat sistem persinyalan otomatis tidak berfungsi dan mengakibatkan gangguan perjalanan kereta.Baca juga: Mesin Tiket Otomatis Tak Berfungsi, Penumpang Kereta di Chennai Harus AntreAkibat sabotase sistem persinyalan ini, membawa unsur ketakutan yang berbeda ke pikiran penumpang pada hari Selasa. Memang sabotase tak sampai sore saat masalah terlihat karena CMRL kemudian mengatakan gangguan dalam sistem sebagai alasan persinyalan otomatis rusak. “Dua dari staf non-eksekutif kami merusak sistem pensinyalan otomatis, yang menyebabkan kegagalan fungsi pada sore hari tanggal 29 April. CMRL menyampaikan permintaan maaf yang tulus kepada penumpang atas ketidaknyamanan yang ditimbulkan,” ujar pernyataan CMRL yang dikutip KabarPenumpang.com dari laman thehindu.com (1/5/2019).CMRL pada Selasa sore mengatakan layanan langsung dari Chennai Central ke bandara, yang dihentikan, telah dipulihkan.“Operasi kereta antar-koridor antara Pusat ke Bandara telah berhasil dipulihkan pada pukul 1.30 malam. hari ini (30 April). Semua layanan kereta Metro berjalan sesuai jadwal,” twit CMRL.Kemudian di hari itu, pihak kereta Metro Chennai mengajukan pengaduan ke kantor polisi Koyambedu dimana General manager bersama Satheesh Prabhu, mengatakan 18 anggota staf menyerang dan melecehkannya ketika dia mencegah mereka memasuki area terbatas Pusat Pengendalian Operasi dari mana seluruh operasi Kereta Api Chennai dapat dipantau.Mereka juga menyabotase peralatan pensinyalan, yang menyebabkan kegagalan operasi, menciptakan kepanikan dan ketidaknyamanan yang luar biasa bagi para penumpang.Banyak penumpang mengeluh bahwa mereka tidak dapat menggunakan layanan pada hari Selasa sampai mereka dipulihkan pada pukul 01.30 malam waktu setempat.Ramani Krishnan, seorang penduduk Vadpalani, mengatakan bahwa dia ketinggalan pesawat karena kereta ditunda dan harus membatalkan pertemuan karena kekacauan. Di akun Twitter, Suresh (@ji_Sriram) mengatakan CMRL seharusnya telah mengatur pengaturan perjalanan darurat dengan bus atau kendaraan lain, terutama pada rute bandara ke Central Chennai, untuk membantu para penumpang yang terdampar.Banyak warganet lain di Twitter menyuarakan keluhan mereka, termasuk mengungkapkan kemarahan atas tindakan sabotase, tetapi juga mengeluhkan kereta berjalan lambat dan frekuensi yang berkurang di Bandara Chennai ke bentangan Washermanpet, terutama bahkan setelah CMRL mengklaim telah memulihkan layanan.Baca juga: Chennai Mofussil, Terminal Bus Terbesar dengan Kapasitas 2.000 BusTak hanya itu banyak yang mengeluh bahwa kartu mereka tidak diterima, dan di beberapa stasiun, penumpang mengeluh bahwa tidak ada yang tersedia untuk mengeluarkan token perjalanan. Kemungkinan hal ini disebabkan oleh kekurangan staf di stasiun, karena CMRL mengklaim bahwa mereka menjalankan layanan pada hari Selasa dengan hanya staf outsourcing dan lima karyawan CMRL. Diketahui sebanyak 250 staf CMRL memboikot pekerjaan pada hari Selasa.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading… RelatedKetepatan Waktu Kereta India Mengalami Penurunan Akibat Faktor Keterlambatan07/09/2018In “Darat”Bus Kota di Chennai, Potret Buruk Transportasi di India29/05/2019In “Bus dalam kota”Untuk Pertama Kalinya Mumbaikars Merasakan Layanan Kereta Ekonomi AC27/12/2017In “Darat”last_img read more

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Video: Dan Gilbert Joins Cubs at White House to Celebrate World Series

first_imgJust when you thought Cavs owner Dan Gilbert couldn’t possibly make himself any more disliked in Cleveland, he joins the Chicago Cubs at the White House to celebrate the 2016 World Series.Cavs owner Dan Gilbert was at the White House today for the Cubs ceremony. I have no idea why. pic.twitter.com/AQ44gTqz0R— Colin Jones (@colinjones) June 28, 2017Gilbert has been a well-documented supporter of President Donald Trump, making significant contributions to his campaign and attending a fundraiser in 2016.For what it’s worth, LeBron James has been about as anti-Trump as any pro athlete and has used his public platform to criticize the president at various times over the past two years.“Where’s Dan? Where’s Dan Gilbert? He’s right outside — grab him. Where’s Dan? Dan Gilbert just came in.” Trump said, “He’s the basketball — he’s looking for a good basketball player. Anybody play basketball?”Gilbert made a light joke saying,”This is tough for a guy from Cleveland,” a reference to the Cleveland Indians loss to the Cubs in the World Series that made the room laugh. Trump then encouraged Gilbert to join the Cubs for a picture.Gilbert was at the White House to share a story of Detroit’s transformation, as he’s been a major investor in the revitalization of his hometown. Related Topics Matt Medley is co-editor at NEO Sports Insiders, covers the Cleveland Cavaliers, Cleveland Indians and high school sports in Northeast Ohio.Follow @MedleyHoops on Twitter for live updates from games.center_img Matt Medleylast_img read more

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