A Pair of Shipwrecked WWIIEra Submarines Just Vanished from the Sea Near

July 18, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_img Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndoNucificTop Dr. Reveals The 1 Nutrient Your Gut Must HaveNucificUndo More than 100 World War II-era shipwrecks decorate the seafloor around Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore — and now, there are two fewer. According to Dutch media reports, a pair of submarines that sank off the coast of Malaysia in 1941 mysteriously vanished late last week, leaving behind only some broken scraps and ghostly outlines in the sand. The wrecked subs — Dutch vessels named HNLMS O 16 and HNLMS K XVII — also contained the remains of 79 crewmen, which are now missing. [17 Mysterious Shipwrecks You Can See on Google Earth] How does a shipwreck simply disappear? According to Dutch government officials, the subs were likely stolen by scrap-metal scavengers, who have made a habit of pilfering old wrecks from the region. As many as 40 World War II-era ships have been partially or completely dismantled by scavengers, a 2017 report by the Guardian found, resulting in the desecration of the remains of some 4,500 crewmen who went down with their ships.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65894-dutch-wwii-era-submarines-vanished.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Salvaging a shipwreck usually requires blowing the vessel apart with explosives, then spending days or weeks hauling any valuable metals up onto the surface with a crane. For their trouble, scavengers can come away with millions of dollars’ worth of steel per ransacked ship, plus other spoils, such as copper cables and phosphor bronze propellers, according to the Guardian article. Wartime shipwrecks are protected under international treaties as the unmarked graves of departed soldiers — however, that has not stopped salvagers from destroying the wrecks of the American, British, Dutch, English, Australian and Japanese vessels resting in South East Asian waters. In March 2018, Malaysian officials signed an agreement with the Dutch foreign minister to better protect Dutch war wrecks in Malaysia’s waters. (Parts of Malaysia were once under Dutch colonial rule.) The agreement followed a string of particularly serious shipwreck desecrations; in 2016, the wrecks of three Dutch warships vanished from the bottom of the Java Sea off the coast of Indonesia, along with the remains of 2,200 people, the Guardian reported. In Photos: Diving for a Famed Roman Shipwreck Disasters at Sea: 6 Deadliest Shipwrecks Shipwrecks Gallery: Secrets of the Deeplast_img



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