September 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgAt the Surface Transportation Board hearing on rail issues in Fargo, N.D. next week, ASA Director Lance Peterson will testify for ASA and Minnesota Soybean Growers Association on the need to move grain out ahead of and during a big harvest. His testimony is an update on the testimony he delivered earlier this spring in Washington to the STB. The North Dakota Soybean Growers Association also will testify.The backlog of rail cars to move grain out of the upper Midwest continues, leaving many elevators still full of 2013-crop grain ahead of a looming 2014 harvest. The backlog is negatively affecting basis levels and cash bids, and is likely to create a real grain storage crisis once new crop harvest begins, further impacting producers.last_img read more

September 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgThe Center for Food Safety, commercial fishing and conservation groups have filed a lawsuit against National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) against the new Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Rule, which creates a permitting process for offshore aquaculture in the Gulf. American Soybean Association (ASA) has strongly supported the finalization of the rule.The final regulation comes 10 years in the making and would allow up to 20 aquaculture facilitates to yield over 60 million pounds of fish a year, within the Gulf of Mexico. In the lawsuit, the groups list concerns including the farmed fish escaping the aquaculture facilities and changing the wild fish populations, spreading disease and polluting the environment with excess feed, waste and chemicals.”Offshore industrial aquaculture will cause irreparable harm to the Gulf ecosystems and coastal communities,” said George Kimbrell, senior attorney for the group, which is pursuing the suit with 11 other organizations, including the Gulf Fishermen’s Association, Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Shareholders’ Alliance, Clearwater Marine Association, Florida Wildlife Federation and Food and Water Watch.According to the United Nations, even though the U.S. has the largest sea area, more than 90 percent of the United States seafood is imported; leaving a $14 billion deficit. The world is now eating more farmed fish than wild catches, according to the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome.last_img read more

September 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgThe American Soybean Association (ASA) and other agricultural groups this week sent a letter to leaders of the House and Senate appropriations committees to express support for a continuation of the strong and growing funding levels for inland waterways infrastructure functions performed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The past two years have seen increased funding to record levels for both the construction and operations and maintenance accounts of the USACE.For Fiscal Year 2017 the industry supports full funding (the amount supported by revenue derived from the barge fuel fee) of the Inland Waterways Trust Fund, which is expected to be $390 million as well as a minimum of $3.1 billion for Operations & Maintenance.As the letter indicates, from an agricultural perspective, having access to a modern and efficient inland waterways transportation system is vital to the efficient production, marketing and shipment of agricultural products in international commerce. In 2014, 73 percent of the volume of U.S. agricultural exports and 65 percent of imports were transported via our waterways. Having access to competitive barge transportation also helps discipline rates for other modes of transportation- an important factor given current depressed agricultural commodity values. The full letter can be viewed here.ASA and state soybean associations continue to be active leaders in the efforts to improve inland waterways infrastructure. In addition to the ag coalition letter, ASA, several state soybean associations and multiple soybean industry partners signed a letter led by the Waterways Council urging support for the Navigation Ecosystem Sustainability Program (NESP), which encompasses the planned upgrades to locks and dams on the Upper Mississippi River System. Those letters can be viewed here.The FY2017 waterways funding requests will be among the priorities advocated during the Hill visits on March 15 in Washington, D.C.last_img read more

September 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgVancouver will follow an “aggressive” time line in recruiting and hiring a new city manager, with the process set to be done before Nov. 1, the city council and its management consultants decided Monday.By Oct. 25, councilors and the management search firm they hired, Waldron & Company, plan to firm up requirements for the position; go through references and background; determine two or three finalists; and interview and make their decisions. City Manager Pat McDonnell will leave the city on Nov. 1 to take a job with SEH America.The city will first open the application process to current employees and employees who worked for the city in the past two years, with applications due by Oct. 8. The process could change, however, if at any point a majority of the council chooses to expand their scope.Over an hour-and-a-half discussion, the consultants outlined the qualities that council members shared in individual interviews last week — which included varied and even opposing desires like “grounded” and “creative,” “mature” and “fresh ideas,” and “stay the course” and “finds new opportunities.”After listing all of the seven members’ top issues and priorities for a new city manager, Waldron & Company Managing Director Lara Cunningham quipped the applicant must also “walk on water.”last_img read more

September 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgA glowing economic analysis of a proposal to build a $22.7 million stadium at Clark College estimates the project would generate $206.5 million over the expected 20-year term of the public-private investment.The Columbia River Economic Development Council, which commissioned the study, passed a resolution supporting the project.The proposal has drawn criticism because it would be partially financed with a countywide 5 percent admissions tax.The $206.5 million figure includes $34.5 million from construction, $4.6 million annually from the Yakima Bears and another $4 million annually from using the stadium to host regional and national tournaments.Short Season LLC, the owners of the Yakima Bears, announced plans in May to move the team to Vancouver to fill the void left by the Portland Beavers.When the Beavers left for Tucson, the Portland area became the largest metropolitan area in the country with no professional baseball team. The closest squad, the Salem-Keizer Volcanoes, has seen attendance increase 27 percent.“The Bears should be able to draw greater per game attendance than the estimated 2,900,” the study says. “It would not be unreasonable to see average per game attendance closer to 3,400-3,500.”As part of the move, Short Season LLC asked county commissioners to impose the admissions tax to fund a 70-30 public-private split to build the stadium.last_img read more

September 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgMost police and fire officials at a crime scene or house fire can quickly scan the crowd of bystanders and spot the press.(The note pads and cameras usually give us away).But on occasion, we do blend in — which can be interesting.Two volunteers with Neighbors on Watch were looking for stolen vehicles and car prowlers in east Vancouver last month.Volunteers noticed a vehicle sitting in the back of an almost vacant parking lot. Two people were sitting in the front seat, and the engine was running.The volunteers radioed police to let the officers know there was a suspicious vehicle with two “kids” in it.They’re OK, Vancouver police Sgt. Steve Dobbs replied over the radio.Dobbs, who was in plainclothes, was sitting in the driver’s seat of that suspicious vehicle — an undercover police car.And the second “kid” in the car?It was a Columbian reporter writing a story on that night’s Neighborhood Response Team operation.Reporter in the courtWe can become part of the court proceedings, too.Attorneys often ask prospective jurors if they read about the case in the paper.But our newsroom staffers do more than report on courts. Sometimes we’re asked to determine guilt or innocence when we’re part of that jury pool.A recent newsroom discussion of a case brought back memories of the late Dave Fielder, a veteran of the sports staff and copy desk who reported for jury duty a few years ago.Like the other prospective jurors, he was asked if he’d read about the crime in the paper. This reply got Dave thumbed from the jury.“Read it? I wrote the headline.”Off Beat lets members of The Columbian news team step back from our newspaper beats to write the story behind the story, fill in the story or just tell a story.last_img read more

September 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgWEMBLEY, England — Hope Solo found herself enveloped in a group hug at the final whistle. Abby Wambach ran to join the fun in a celebration that unleashed a year of bottled-up frustration.The U.S. women’s soccer team won its third straight Olympic gold medal Thursday, beating Japan 2-1 in a rematch of last year’s World Cup final and avenging the most painful loss in its history.Carli Lloyd scored early in both halves, Solo leaped and dived to make saves, and the entire roster found the redemption it had been seeking since that penalty kick shootout loss in Germany last summer.Before 80,203 at Wembley Stadium, a record crowd for a women’s soccer game at the Olympics, the teams put on a back-and-forth, don’t-turn-your-head soccer showcase, proving again that these are the two premier teams in the world. Women’s soccer is still in its formative stages in Britain, but the match proved more than worthy for the hallowed grounds of the beautiful game.And the Japanese perhaps played just as beautifully as the Americans, using their speed and discipline to dominate possession and scoring chances for long stretches before finally cutting a 2-0 deficit in half with about a half-hour to go.last_img read more

September 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgIn nine months, a statewide tracking system has blocked more than 13,000 sales of over-the-counter medicines with ingredients used to make methamphetamine.The Washington State Board of Pharmacy activated the new monitoring system, the National Precursor Log Exchange, on Oct. 15, 2011. The electronic system monitors the sale of three ingredients — pseudoephedrine, ephedrine and phenylpropanolamine — which are in over-the-counter medicines for colds and allergies but are also used to make meth. State and federal laws limit the amount of medicine containing the ingredients a person can purchase.Through July 2012, Washington’s system blocked the sale of 13,391 ingredients, which is equivalent to 37,172 grams, or 82 pounds, of ingredients.“Our state was once called ‘the poster children for the meth epidemic,’ and we’re now recognized as a success story,” state Secretary of Health Mary Selecky said in a news release.In 2010, the Washington Legislature passed a law tightening restrictions on the sales of products containing the methamphetamine precursors pseudoephedrine, ephedrine and phenylpropanolamine. The law requires pharmacies to keep the products behind the counter or in a locked display case and maintain a sales record. Unlike Oregon, a prescription is not required to purchase the drugs.The law also required the Board of Pharmacy to implement the real-time electronic sales tracking system that went live last year. Prior to that, pharmacies and other retailers recorded sales information in written logbooks.When people wish to purchase products with meth precursors, retailers run the buyer’s identification, such as a driver’s license, and details about the product through the system. Real-time information shows the cashier if the buyer has exceeded the allowed quantity of medicine. The system also flags drug purchases made in other states.last_img read more

September 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgA neurologist diagnosed Vancouver resident Helen Ramatowski with Parkinson’s disease in January 2011. She had diagnosed herself months earlier.Parkinson’s Resources of OregonFor more stories, blogs and information on nutrition, fitness, health and advice on how to be healthier, visit columbian.com/livewell.After watching both her mother and brother live with the disease, Ramatowski knew her symptoms were signs of what was to come.Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurological disease that leads to tremors and difficulty with walking, movement and coordination. There is no cure.About 1.5 million Americans have Parkinson’s disease; an estimated 25,000 people with the disease live in Oregon and Southwest Washington, according to Parkinson’s Resources of Oregon.Ramatowski’s first sign came in early 2010 when she noticed what appeared to be a tremor in her left leg. Her physician made a note to keep an eye on her leg.By late 2010, Ramatowski had a pronounced tremor. Her leg was jumping, keeping her from sleeping. In January 2011, a neurologist confirmed she had Parkinson’s disease.Ramatowski immediately sought support. She turned to the nonprofit Parkinson’s Resources of Oregon, which serves nearly 1,000 households in Southwest Washington. The group connected Ramatowski with a support group and movement classes in Vancouver.last_img read more

September 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgPeaceHealth said Friday that Rainy Atkins, who’s served 10 years as chief administrative officer for PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center in Vancouver, will retire on Sept. 6. Sy Johnson, CEO of PeaceHealth St. John Medical Center in Longview, will succeed her in that position and also has been named chief operating officer of PeaceHealth’s Columbia Network.Atkins, a neonatal and pediatric air transport nurse by training, held several positions with Flagstaff Medical Center and Northern Arizona Healthcare before coming to Vancouver in 2003. “It’s been 10 wonderful, exceptional years,” she said in a news release. “I’ve been privileged to work with this team to make PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center the leading hospital in southwestern Washington.”The announcement of Atkins’ retirement and appointment of Johnson to new posts follows last month’s news that Joe Kortum, who led Vancouver-based Southwest Washington Medical Center for eight years before serving two years as CEO of the Columbia Network of PeaceHealth, will retire in January.Atkins “has been a driving force behind our significant accomplishments around the quality and safety of patient care,” Kortum said in the news release issued by PeaceHealth. And she was “instrumental in establishing the Kearney Breast Center and Firstenburg Tower, as well as establishing a relationship with OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital to improve access to neonatal care in Vancouver,” according to the news release. In 2010, Clark College named Atkins a “Woman of Achievement.”The leadership changes come as Vancouver-based PeaceHealth seeks to save $30 million, on top of $100 million in savings it already has identified, to close a significant budget gap. As part of its cost-cutting moves, PeaceHealth suspended hiring. The decision applies to its corporate headquarters and support operations in east Vancouver, as well as PeaceHealth Southwest. The nonprofit will seek to trim costs through attrition and keeping some vacant positions open. Priority for filling vacancies will go to bedside care.last_img read more

September 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgA power outage hit 16,000 Clark Public Utilities customers Monday afternoon in Vancouver’s Cascade Park area.A cracked insulator on a transmission pole affected three substations in the Ellsworth Springs neighborhood, according to Erica Erland, spokeswoman for the utilities company. Originally, it was thought that a car hit the pole, which would have caused a similar outage.The outage was reported just after 3 p.m. near the intersection of Northeast 122nd Avenue and Northeast Ninth Street. Within the hour, almost all customers’ power was restored, Erland said.Traffic signals along Southeast Mill Plain Boulevard and south to Southeast McGillivray Boulevard were temporarily affected.Reports came into 911 dispatch around 3:10 p.m. that some signals were flashing red and others were out, said Kim Kapp, spokeswoman for the Vancouver Police Department.Traffic crawled along the busy Mill Plain corridor during the outage. Employees at McGrath’s Fish House, 12501 S.E. Second Circle, could see the backup from the restaurant.Customers had to be turned away for about 30 minutes during the midafternoon outage.“Thankfully, it is a slow time,” said manager David Goldman.In the meantime, employees turned off the gas and transferred food to the freezer.Larger business buildings in east Vancouver, including all six Park Plaza towers, were temporarily out of power. The complex host about 80 tenants.last_img read more

September 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgAbout Eid al-Adhao What: Muslim holiday, one of holiest religious celebrations of Islam.o Also called: The Feast of the Sacrifice, the Greater Eid.o Who celebrates it: Muslims worldwide.o When: In the Islamic month of Dhu-al-Hijjah; this year, it began Oct. 15.o What it commemorates: The end of the pilgrimage to Mecca (hajj) in Saudi Arabia; it also marks the prophet Ibrahim’s willingness to obey Allah (God) and sacrifice his first son, Ishmael. Allah provided a sacrificial lamb for Ibrahim, and Ishmael’s life was spared. The story also is told in the Christian Old Testament and the Jewish Torah. Christians and Jews know Ibrahim as Abraham, and say he offered his second son, Isaac, for sacrifice.n How it’s celebrated: Prayer, sharing meals, giving gifts, women decorating their skin with henna calligraphy; in some countries, families slaughter sheep, cows and goats, often donating one-third of the meat to the needy.International Programs at Clark Collegeo Number of international students: 95.o Number who are Saudi citizens: 27.o New club: Saudi Student Club at Clark College.o On the web: Learn more about International Programs.Ahmed Biladi, 18, knows about being stereotyped. When he flew from his home in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia, to the U.S. to attend Clark College, he was “held up for interrogation at the airport. I have two passports stamped together,” he said. “I travel a lot.”For the first time in Clark College history, the largest number of the 95 international students at Clark College are Saudi citizens. Many of the 27 Saudi students realized that Americans were misinformed about modern life in Saudi Arabia. So the students asked to start the Saudi Student Club to dispel the myths of people riding camels, herding sheep and living in tents pitched in the desert.“People confuse our modern culture,” said Biladi, who, like the other students, wore contemporary American clothing.Biladi and most of his fellow Saudi students hail from Jeddah, a thriving metropolis of 5.1 million people. That’s much larger than the population of Clark County and the Portland metropolitan area combined.last_img read more

September 16, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgSANDY, Ore. — Police say a pedestrian in Sandy was struck and killed by a motorist who has been charged with assault and drunken driving.Sandy police Officer Samuel Craven said Michael Topliff, 41, was hit late Friday by a Ford Mustang headed north on Beers Avenue. He died Saturday at a Portland hospital.The motorist, Philip Krogstad, 32, of Sandy, initially fled before returning on foot, Craven said. Krogstad’s blood-alcohol content was .14, nearly twice the legal limit, police said.Krogstad’s car was found at his apartment complex, a block from the crash scene.He was booked into the Clackamas County Jail. Craven said additional charges are likely because the victim died.last_img read more

September 15, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgEXCLUSIVE: Insurance and reinsurance organisation Aspen has launched an online financial education programme for its 700 UK employees.Its financial education programme, which is provided by Nudge. launched on 20 April 2018, ahead of Aspen’s annual flexible benefits selection window in May. It was launched via an email campaign and through promotions by the organisation’s reward team.The new programme is part of a wider strategic review of Aspen’s reward and benefit offering. This review included a focus on providing better support for employees regarding their financial wellbeing, and also looked at the organisation’s pension scheme and sharesave scheme.The programme allows employees to access a personalised online platform, with content to help manage their money and support them in planning their financial goals. The programme also sends employees personalised notifications, or ‘nudges’. These are bite-sized tips relating to financial information specific to the individual. For example: details pertaining to developments in legislation or interest rates, information on lifestyle changes, such as moving homes, or alterations to employee benefits provisions.Aspen is also introducing a new pension option in May 2018, in time for the next benefits selection window, and as part of its financial wellbeing strategy. Employees will be able to flex their employer pension contributions in order to support personal financial objectives, once they meet a minimum employee contribution. This will allow them to save into other vehicles, such as an individual savings account (ISA) or Aspen’s sharesave scheme, or to pay off existing debt.Elliot Rees-Davies (pictured), global head of reward at Aspen, said: “As individuals, we all have different lifestyles, priorities, goals and ambitions. Our aim is to offer our people access to the rewards and benefits that are among the best in our industry, and which help every individual make the most of their time with us.“We undertook a full review of our benefit offering and realised that we could do more to support the financial wellness of our people. We decided to introduce comprehensive financial education support ahead of our annual flex window to help guide our people not only in better managing their money, but also in making benefit selections that fitted their lifestyle and priorities.”last_img read more

September 15, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgPLANTATION, FLA. (WSVN) – A Holocaust survivor shared her story with students at an elementary school in Plantation, Tuesday.Zelda Fuksman shared her experiences with students at Mirror Lake Elementary.School officials said they hope to teach pupils, who learned about the Holocaust this month, the importance of tolerance. “The message really is, never again. There was a Holocaust,” said Gigi McIntire, a counselor at the school. “There are other things going on in the world today, and we hope our kids can learn to help each other.”Fuksman specializes in speaking to young children about the Holocaust and provides age-appropriate answers. This is the second time she has spoken at the school.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

September 15, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgTALLAHASSEE, FLA. (WSVN) – Florida’s 29 presidential electors are preparing to cast their vote this week.The Sunshine State residents will meet in Tallahassee, Monday, to officially vote for the president and vice president of the United States.President-elect Donald Trump won Florida, and since the electors are all considered reliable Republicans, none are expected to cast a vote for Democraric candidate Hillary Clinton.On Jan. 6, all 538 Electoral College votes will be tallied during a joint session of Congress.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

September 15, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgMIAMI (WSVN) – A World War II veteran received home improvement help for the holidays.The Home Depot Foundation partnered with Rebuilding Together Miami-Dade to renovate veteran Charles Frederick Adderley’s Miami house, Thursday.Nearly 40 volunteers spent the day making repairs and decorating his home with plenty of Christmas cheer.Adderley said he was stunned by the outpouring of generosity. “I can’t find the words to express my happiness, but it’s all because of all of you that have been involved in my life in the past few months,” he said. “And I can only say from the depths of my heart that this is a divine intervention into my life.”The Home Depot Foundation is dedicated to improving the homes and lives of more U.S. military veterans and their families.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

September 15, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgAs of 6:30PM, FLL is experiencing 111 delays and 3 cancellations due to weather. Please check with your airline for the latest flight information.— Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood Int’l Airport (FLL) (@FLLFlyer) August 12, 2018Some of the delays lasted up to an hour.Officials confirmed inclement weather caused the delays. They advised travelers to contact their airlines for more information.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. FORT LAUDERDALE-HOLLYWOOD INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, FLA. (WSVN) – Stormy weather led to widespread frustration for travelers at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport.As of 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, the airport reported 111 delayed flights and three cancellations.last_img read more

September 15, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgCORAL GABLES, FLA. (WSVN) – Small Business Saturday has become an important part of the holiday shopping weekend, and South Florida was no exception.7News cameras captured shoppers taking advantage of deals along Miracle Mile in Coral Gables.“I always participate in Small Business Saturday, but I shop small whenever I can often,” said shopper Amy Donner, “mostly because it’s more fun, and I do better, and I enjoy it.”Created almost a decade ago, it’s brought communities closer together to support all types of family-owned businesses.“The support is definitely in the thought process but really secondary to the experience,” said Donner. “It’s just a better experience shopping with my local venders. I typically know them by name. They know me, they know my style.”The local economic impact is huge. A new study done by American Express found two-thirds of every dollar spent at small businesses stays in the local community.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

September 14, 2019 | | Post a Comment

first_imgAndrew Peterson, the assistant attorney general in charge of the state Office of Special Prosecutions and Appeals, said troopers finished their investigation of the case in the days leading up to Christmas. Troopers say Armstrong pulled McComas over around 1:05 a.m., on October 1, 2017,  for a speeding violation which turned into a drug investigation. According to reports, McComas was handcuffed and put in the back of the patrol car. While Armstrong was continuing his investigation, McComas managed to get in the driver’s seat and then attempted to drive away. According to the online dispatch, Armstrong tried to stop McComas but ended up firing his gun at him. Autopsy confirms McComas died from gunshot wounds. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Alaska State Troopers have completed their investigation into the officer involved shooting that occured in Seward, when an officer fatally shot a man during an early morning traffic stop.center_img Officer Matthew ‘Eddy’ Armstrong, a 13-year veteran of Seward Police Department was named in a dispatch released by Alaska State Troopers on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, as the officer who fired the fatal shot. The man killed was 41-year-old Chugiak resident Micah McComas. Story as aired: Audio PlayerJennifer-on-case-closed-in-seward-shooting.mp3VmJennifer-on-case-closed-in-seward-shooting.mp300:00RPdlast_img read more